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Paul L.

Paul L.

The European Commission is working on a plan to give news publishers greater rights over content appearing on search engines such as Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google, which is an Action Alerts PLUS holding.

Speaking to journalists in Brussels Friday, EC spokesman Christian Wigand said the proposal is due out in the second half of September, part of a broader effort to forge a so-called Digital Single Market in the 28-country European Union.

But Wigand downplayed media reports of plans to give European news publishers the right to charge Internet platforms for showing snippets of their articles.

In particular he said the aim is to recognize the role of publishers as investors in content "and give them a stronger position when negotiating with other market players. This is absolutely not about an EU levy on search engines."

He added that the overall objective "is to make sure that Europeans can access a wide and diverse legal offer of content, and therefore [to] strengthen cultural diversity, while ensuring that authors and other rights holders are better and more fairly protected."

At least one expert thinks the plan may not necessarily hurt big players like Google and its YouTube video-sharing site, but rather smaller players seeking to establish viable alternatives.

"These little guys are the ones that content owners will have no qualms about charging for access to their content," said Matthew Jones, a London-based partner with EIP Europe law firm, via e-mail.

"They are the ones that will not be able to afford to implement technology that will allow them to filter out content that is protected by copyright," he said. "As such, these smaller players may find themselves priced out of the market."

Source : https://www.thestreet.com/story/13686465/1/copyright-reform-to-give-news-outlets-more-say-over-search-engine-content.html

Microsoft is introducing some of its Cortana personal assistant smarts to its desktop search engine, with a new feature rolling out today that will use your previous query to inform your next, providing it with key contextual information so that you can search more conversationally, in the same way you’d ask follow-up questions of a friend during a regular chat.

So, if you’re searching for a specific actor, maybe by asking who played Star-Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy, Bing will not only provide you with Chris Pratt’s name directly in results, but you can ask follow-up questions, like “Who is his wife?” or “How old is he?” and the search engine will provide those answers directly about the subject of the prior search, once again in the results page directly.

These are features that Microsoft is rolling out now, so users in the U.S. at least should have access to it. You can continue asking questions without having to name the subject of the search, too, so it really does become like a fairly lengthy conversation over time.

Microsoft’s efforts in bringing more contextual smarts to Bing are admirable, since it brings us closer to the day we can interact with our computing devices in ways more similar to the habits we have in interacting with the world in general. This should make it easier and faster to string queries together and find simple answers to simple questions, and eventually, it could make it possible for search engines and other computing software to engage in even complex conversations with end users.

https://techcrunch.com/2014/08/13/microsofts-bing-will-now-keep-track-of-context-for-conversational-searching-on-desktop/

Google dedicated its 31 July doodle to mark the 136th birth anniversary of acclaimed novelist Munshi Premchand.

"Today's homepage celebrates a man who filled many pages (of a different kind) with words that would forever change India's literary landscape," said the search engine.

"Although much of it was fiction, Premchand's writing often incorporated realistic settings and events, a style he pioneered within Hindi literature," Google said.

"His last and most famous novel, Godaan (1936), inspired the doodle, which shows Premchand (sometimes referred to as "Upanyas Samrat," or, "emperor among novelists") bringing his signature working-class characters to life. On what would have been his 136th birthday, the illustration pays tribute to the multitude of important stories he told," the description to the Google doodle reads.

Here are eight interesting facts about the 'Upanyas Samrat':

  1. Born Dhanpat Rai in a small village near Varanasi in 1880, the renowned author started writing at the age of 13.
  2. Many of his early works are in Urdu. His began writing in Hindi in 1914, with his first short story, Saut, being unveiled in 1915.
  3. He began writing under the pen name of Nawab Rai before switching to Premchand. He produced more than a dozen novels, 250 short stories, and a number of essays, many under the pen name Premchand.
  4. Munshi Premchand worked as a teacher in a government district school in Baharaich. He quit his teaching job to join the non-cooperation movement in 1920.
  5. His works are believed to have been largely influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and the non-cooperation movement.
  6. His 1924 short story Shatranj Ke Khiladi (The Chess Players) was made into a film. The 1977 Satyajit Ray-directorial, starring Sanjeev Kumar, Shabana Azmi, Farida Jalal, Farooq Shaikh, among others, was narrated by Amitabh Bachchan. It won the National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Hindi that year.
  7. Not many know that Premchand also wrote the script for the film Majdoor.
  8. His work Godaan is considered one of the greatest Hindustani novels of modern Indian literature. The book was later translated into English and also made into a Hindi film in 1963.

http://www.catchnews.com/tech-news/google-doodle-marks-munshi-premchand-s-136th-birth-anniversary-8-lesser-known-facts-about-the-emperor-among-novelists-1469948223.html/fullview

Facebook's goal is to connect with everyone, yes every single person in the world. Not just that, but Facebook wants to connect to everyone at all times, in every waking moment. Facebook envisions a future where you will always be engaging with some part of the Facebook ecosystem, whether it's on its mega social platform at Facebook, using it's search engine, messaging a business associate or communicating on video or via a virtual reality environment.

But first lets talk business.

"I often talk about how when we develop new products we think about it in three phases, said Zuckerberg. "First, building a consumer use case. Then, second, making it so that people can organically interact with businesses. And then third, on top of that, once there's a large volume of people interacting with businesses, give businesses tools to reach more people and pay. And that's ultimately the business opportunity."

During the earnings call yesterday, Mark Zuckerberg opened the curtain into Facebook's plans, strategies and dreams for the future. He first provided the latest metrics illustrating Facebook's continued success, 1.7 billion people now use Facebook every month, and 1.1 billion people use it every day. He said that Facebook revenue grew by 59% year-over year to $6.4 billion, and advertising revenue was up 63% to $6.2 billion.

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook said that Q2 ad revenue grew 63% and mobile ad revenue hit $5.2 billion, up 81% year-over-year, and was approximately 84% of total ad revenue. Facebook is now truly a mobile app rather than a desktop experience for the vast majority of its users.

Zuckerberg said that they continue to see excellent growth and over the past year Facebook has added over 200 million people using Facebook on a monthly basis. Time spent per person increased double digit percentages year-over-year across Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. And that doesn't even include WhatsApp yet.

Facebook is still growing rapidly and that's because it has continued to evolve. It's evolution has happened because of increased bandwidth, technological advancements, acquisitions of new platforms like WhatsApp and Instagram and most importantly continuing to be on the cutting edge of what people want in a social network. All of this while simultaneously building a successful business model that pays for this evolution.

What's really interesting however, is how Zuckerberg sees Facebook transforming in the future. "Our results show our progress as we work to make the world more open and connected across our three-, five- and ten-year horizons," he said. "Over the next three years we are focused on continuing to build our community and help people share more of what matters to them. The next five years are about building our newer products into full ecosystems with developers and businesses. And over the next ten years we are working to build new technologies to help everyone connect in new ways."

Facebook is seeking to be the world's business platform, not just the peoples. More on this below in the Search section on a Facebook future where it is competing with LinkedIn.

"We're excited to announce that we now have 60 million monthly active business Pages on Facebook," said Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. "We also continue to grow the number of active advertisers on our platform. This shows that both our free and paid products are providing value to marketers of all sizes around the world. We continue to focus on our three priorities — capitalizing on the shift to mobile, growing the number of marketers using our ad products, and making our ads more relevant and effective."

Trust me, this is just the beginning of Facebook's morphing into both a personal and business platform in the future.

The Future of Facebook is Video

Facebook used to be mostly text and over the years they changed to be photo centric, with many people using Facebook as their family photo album. People still do that but Zuckerberg envisions a huge change coming. "We see a world that is video first, with video at the heart of all of our apps and services."

"Over the past six months we have been particularly focused on Live video. Live represents a new way to share what's happening in more immediate and creative ways," Zuckerberg said. "This quarter Candace Payne's Chewbacca mask video was viewed almost 160 million times. Live is also changing the way we see politics, as news organizations and delegates go Live from the Republican and Democratic conventions. And we have seen in Minnesota and Dallas how Live can shine a light on important moments as they happen."

At Fortune‘s Most Powerful Women International Summit in London, Nicola Mendelsohn, VP EMEA at Facebook, predicted that the Facebook newsfeed will be all video in 5 years. "It will definitely be mobile. It will probably be all video," Mendelsohn said. "I just think if we look, we already are seeing a year on year decline in text. We're seeing a massive increase as I've said on both pictures and video. So yeah, if I was having a bet, I would say video, video, video."

"When you think about what's happening on video on our platform we're really excited by the production and consumption of video and we're seeing the full range from people posting the things in their personal lives; the power of what a mobile phone can produce and distribute now is pretty incredible when you compare it to just a few years ago to some of the most sophisticated content producers in the world producing for us," added Sandberg.

Facebook Focuses on Search

Facebook is moving into the search space aggressively, definitely to help it compete with Twitter and perhaps even Google in the future. Facebook launched true keyword search in late 2014 that allows users to search not just profile names or just your friends posts, but also everyone's public posts. And, if you didn't know, all postings default at public, which means that anyone can search for your posts.

The first goal for Facebook with search is to become more like Twitter, where people post their thoughts, feelings and most importantly news reports, especially the on-the-scene kind. When the next plane lands in the Hudson, Facebook wants the survivor standing on the wing to use their platform to post about this breaking news, not Twitter. More precisely, Facebook wants you to use Facebook Live to stream your personalized live news coverage.

"We're making good progress on core services within the Facebook app, like Search," Zuckerberg stated. "A growing way people use search is to find what people are saying about a topic across the more than 2.5 trillion posts in our network. Now, people are doing more than 2 billion searches a day, between looking up people, businesses and other things that they care about. Continuous, steady improvement to services like search are an important part of helping people connect and realizing our mission."

He also said this in minimizing their true plans, in my opinion.

So I'd say we're around the second phase of that in search now. We have a pretty big navigational use case where people look up people and pages and groups that they want to get to and look at and search. One of the big growing use cases that we're investing a lot in is looking up the content in the ecosystem and that is an area that we're very excited about which helps people find more content.

But certainly there's a reasonable amount of behavior in there which is looking for things that over time could be monetizeable or commercial intense and at some point we will probably want to work on that but we're still in the phase of just making it easier for people to find all the content they want and connect with businesses organically.

But what's their next goal? Facebook has certainly focused on the business use of their platform as they continue to look for monetization opportunities. My guess is that Facebook will seek to compete with LinkedIn as the business platform of record.

Over the last few years LinkedIn has certainly moved from a glorified directory of business professionals to a platform for business related news, conversation and connection. Facebook has the platform but would need to figure out how to easily separate family life from business life, which could be done rather easily. With Microsoft buying LinkedIn, Facebook will be highly motivated to compete.

Next up for Facebook Search would be to compete with Google. Why... you ask? Because Google has a market cap of $520 billion, with the majority of that credited to its search business, whileFacebook has a market cap of $362 billion. More importantly, it's about revenue and profit. In 2015, Google had $75 billion in revenue and $16 billion in net income while Facebook had $17 billion in revenue and $3.6 billion in net income.

Google tried to compete with Facebook with Google+ and it failed miserably, but that's because it's harder to get people to change their social habits than it is their search habits. You don't need your friends to use Facebook Search in order for you to find it useful, but you definitely need your friends to move to a new social platform to make it work for you. That was Google's dilemma, but it won't be Facebook's.

"Since it refocused on keywords, Facebook is now seeing 2 billion searches per day of its 2.5 trillion posts," stated TechCrunch writer Josh Constine. "That’s compared to 1.5 billion searches per day in July 2015, and 1 billion in September 2012. That’s a 33% climb in just 9 months."

That's lets than half a reported 3.5 billion searches per day on Google. The difference is that Google's searches are monitizable, while Facebook searches, not so much. However, this must scare the heck out of Google because it shows how ingrained people are to use Facebook for search. Therefore, over time I predict that Facebook will add web indexing to it's search engine. They already have 3.5 billion searches, why not open up search to everything and in the process open up a huge monetization opportunity.

One other prediction, Facebook will disconnect its search app from just Facebook.com, just like they did Messenger. Then, voilà, Facebook is competing with Google.

Making Instagram Stronger

Instagram was purchased by Facebook for $1 billion while it was just getting off the ground. It is now center to its plans on connecting with everyone in the world on a constant always on basis. That's why Instagram is so important to Facebook, it has a foothold with younger people and its active user base is not a clone of Facebook's, so it expands the corporate Facebook's universe of connectivity and engagement.

"Over the next five years we are working hard to build ecosystems around some of our newer products," said Zuckerberg. "Instagram now has more than 500 million monthly actives, with more than 300 million daily. Now we’re working to make the experience more engaging."

He said that when Instagram, despite user pushback, began to rank its feed in order to improve the experience, that they are already seeing a "positive impact" with people spending more time and share more content within the platform.

As always, business is important to Zuckerberg as well. "We’ve also introduced our advertising tools on Instagram and we’re seeing marketers engage with people in creative and innovative ways."

Messaging with Messenger & WhatsApp

"In the two years since we separated Messenger from the main Facebook app -- which was a controversial decision at the time -- we've improved performance and given people new ways to express themselves," commented Zuckerberg. "Now, for the first time, more than 1 billion people are using Messenger every month."

Facebook sees a huge opportunity with messaging because it moves them closer to their goal of connecting everyone on a constant always on basis. That's why they paid $22 billion for WhatsApp, which is a service that barely had a business model.

"I’m also happy with the updates we're making to WhatsApp -- which also has a community of more than 1 billion people," said Zuckerberg. "This quarter we launched new desktop apps and end-to-end encryption, and millions of people are using WhatsApp's voice calling features."

Facebook has big plans for messaging because not only does it help them bring even more people into Facebook's universe, but it moves them into the business space, where Facebook desperately wants to be, because that's where the money is.

"The scale we’ve achieved with our messaging services makes it clear that they are more than just a way to chat with friends," Zuckerberg noted. "That’s why we’re also making it easier for people to connect with groups and businesses as well. We are going to keep focusing on this over the next several years."

Facebook owned messaging has now taken over standard text messaging according to Zuckerberg.

"Between Messenger and WhatsApp I think we're around 60 billion messages a day which is something like three times more than the peak of global SMS traffic."

It's incredible to think that Facebook now owns the messaging space. Who would have thought that 3 years ago?

New Technologies

"I’m also excited about the early progress we’re making on our 10-year initiatives," said Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg during their recent earnings announcement. "We are investing in new technologies to give more people a voice -- including the 4 billion people around the world who aren’t yet online -- and helping more people take advantage of the opportunities that come with the internet."

Facebook is seeking to connect everyone in the world, regardless of any obstacle. It's a long term plan, but Facebook is on it.

"One of the biggest opportunities to grow our community is in developing countries where connectivity is less advanced than what we take for granted here at home," Zuckerberg said. "So over the past couple of years, we’ve began making steady improvements to our apps to make them work regardless of the device or connection people are using. We also built a light-weight version of our Android app, called Facebook Lite, that is tuned to work on 2G networks and is now used by more than 100 million people."

Virtual reality is another huge area of investment for Facebook, especially with their $2 billion purchase of Oculus. They see VR as an extension of connecting and sharing. Know one really knows the future of VR, but it will be deeply engrained in advertising in the future and since all of Facebook's revenue comes from advertising, they need to be in this space.

"We believe that virtual reality can help people share richer experiences and help everyone understand what’s going on around the world," said Zuckerberg. "It’s really early for us in VR but we’re hitting some important milestones. As of the second quarter more than 1 million people a month are using Oculus on mobile phones through our Gear VR 4partnership with Samsung."

Zuckerberg also commented on the potential revenue importance of their investment in VR:

"More than 300 apps are already available at the Oculus store for Gear VR, we’ve filled all of our pre-orders for Oculus Rift and we are seeing increasing demand from retail as stores plan for the holidays. While it’s still early for augmented reality, we're doing AR research and are seeing lightweight versions of AR technology today in mobile apps like MSQRD."

Facebook is Just Getting Started

"So that’s a recap of the progress we’re making in our 10 year plan," said Zuckerberg. "We have a saying at Facebook that our journey is only 1% done -- and while I'm happy with our progress, we have a lot more work to do to grow our community and connect the whole world. That means making big investments and taking risks -- focusing not just on what Facebook is, but on what it can be."

http://www.webpronews.com/facebooks-future-video-search-messaging-vr-2016-07/

Back in 2009, GeekWire co-founders Todd Bishop and John Cook took to the streets of Seattle and asked random passersby a simple question: What is the name of Microsoft’s search engine? At the time, the answer would have been Live Search, but as it turned out, nobody knew that. Responses included everything from MSN and Internet Explorer to Hotmail and Mozilla.

Seven years later, with the news this week that Microsoft’s Bing search engine is making new progress against Google in the search market, we decided to repeat the experiment, taking to the streets and asking the same question: What is the name of Microsoft’s search engine?

In 2016, do people know that the answer is Bing? And more importantly, do they use it? Continue reading to find out.

Katherine Auld (Left) & Katy Brown (Right)

Katherine Auld, a student abroad from Edinburgh Scotland: “(Laughs) is it Bing? I want to say Bing… but I don’t know if that’s right. I’m going to say Bing. I don’t know I use Google.”

Katy Brown, also a student abroad from Edinburgh Scotland: “I don’t know… Yahoo? I don’t know, I don’t know. I use Chrome.”

Serra Dernberger

Serra Dernberger, a restaurant cook: “Oh, I know this one…Um… Shoot. I Can’t think of it right now… shoot. I don’t know. I don’t really use it…”

Stephanie Peitromonaco

Stephanie Pietromonaco, raises money for science research: “MSN? I don’t use it… I think my dad does.”

Trevor Snodgrass

Trevor Snodgrass, works for a DNA Sequencing lab: “Oh! Edge! I don’t know anyone that uses it. Maybe my grandma… ”

Rachel Hines

Rachel Hines is a Bartender/Geologist. “Is it Google? Bing? Bing! I don’t know anyone who uses Bing, I don’t think it’s a worthwhile search engine. I hate it.”

Chad Hickey

Chad Hickey, restaurant worker. “Microsofts search engine is Bing. I don’t use bing because I use google. It’s just what pops up on my computer screen.”

Micheal Falcone & Spencer Judge

Michael Falcone: “Bing. Nope, I don’t use it, I use Google.”

Spencer Judge: “Same here.”

So here’s the bottom line: It seems as though people are indeed more familiar with Microsoft’s search engine than they were in 2009. Most people I encountered knew the name. However, not a single person out of the 15 that I interviewed said they used Bing on a regular basis, or preferred it to Google. So Microsoft still has plenty of room to improve. We’re putting a note on the GeekWire calendar to check back in another six years!

http://www.geekwire.com/2016/geek-street-name-microsofts-search-engine/

Millions of Americans who use public Wi-Fi do not realize that their personal information is at risk of being stolen, according to a survey released Tuesday by cybersecurity company Symantec.The survey, released Tuesday, found that 87 percent of U.S. consumers have used the readily available public internet, whether at a cafe, airport or hotel. The survey, an online survey of 1,025 people, was conducted in May.

"Think about the cost of being connected all the time. Nothing is free," said David Lee, a product manager for Norton. "The biggest threat is your data, traffic and identity could be completely exposed."

The level of ignorance is somewhat alarming. More than 60 percent of consumers think their information is safe when using public internet, according to the study. Only half of consumers think they are responsible for securing their information. Instead 17 percent think websites are responsible for protecting data, while another 17 percent think the Wi-Fi company is.

Common activities on public Wi-Fi include logging into a personal e-mail account (58 percent), logging into social media (56 percent) and accessing bank or financial information (22 percent). Another 13 percent have entered personally identifiable information. All of this information could be stolen if the Wi-Fi connection is unsecure.

Despite growing up with technology, millennials are more likely to exhibit risky behaviors. Nearly 95 percent of millennials have shared information while on public Wi-Fi, the largest percentage of any generation.

Millennials just focus on getting online, said Lee.

To protect yourself when using public Wi-Fi, Lee suggests consumers use a virtual private network (VPN), which will encrypt and anonymize traffic.It's a step only 18 percent of consumers take, with 30 percent admitting they are unfamiliar with VPNs.

To set-up VPN, you need to download an app and then follow your smartphone's steps to set it up. In addition to the study, Norton announced on Tuesday a new app, Norton Wi-Fi Privacy, which includes VPN features.

Source:  http://www.cnbc.com/2016/06/28/most-people-unaware-of-the-risks-of-using-public-wi-fi.html

Now, I do not know if authorship was ever a ranking signal but I assume Google tested it to see if it should be. And we now know Google said it is safe to remove authorship markup from your pages and they also said they don't know who authored something on your site.

But Google has said over the years, I remember Matt Cutts calling out certain authors as awesome and can help your site rank for stuff if you get them to write for you. But I guess that was tested and it didn't play into Google's definition of what is quality content.

John Mueller addressed the question again on Friday's Google Hangout on Google+. He said that Google doesn't know who wrote the article on your site and even if you do have a great writer, write something on your site, it might not be something great that he wrote. So each article needs to "stand on their own," John said.

He said this at the 36:41 minute mark.
Question:

Previously, you said you didn't know really who wrote an article. Does it mean it's not a ranking factor who created content? Danny Sullivan is a great author. If he guest-posted on my blog, wouldn't you think the article would be great because it's made by him?

Answer:

Probably we wouldn't know that. I mean maybe the article is great and it would rank essentially on its own or based on kind of the feedback that we see from users with regards to recommendations like links. But just because a well-known author publishes on someone else's blog doesn't automatically make that blog post really relevant. So it might be that Danny Sullivan post something on some totally random blog and we don't realize that and other users don't realize that, then that's something that might my kind of get lost like that.

So that's also something we're just because one person person wrote it doesn't necessarily mean that the quality will always be really high. So we shouldn't like assume that just because it has maybe Danny Sullivan's author markup on that page that this article is suddenly really valuable and should be raking very high. So from from that point of view at these pages these articles that are written by people they really have to be able to stand on their own.

So I guess, maybe, Google tested to see if who writes something is a good ranking signal? Or maybe, SEOs faked authorship and killed it and Google couldn't use it?

Source:  https://www.seroundtable.com/google-dropped-authorship-as-a-ranking-signal-why-22364.html

At Fractl, a content marketing agency, I lead a team of researchers whose goal it is to conduct studies that will help us further refine our content production and promotions processes. Our research spans from data analysis of 2.6 billion social shares, to in-depth consumer surveys of thousands to people, to viral emotion heat mapping and beyond.

Over the last few years, we've executed close to 30 research projects that are redefining how the marketing industry gains brand awareness, earns consumer engagement, and increases organic search rankings. Our studies have been published on the Harvard Business Review, Inc, Marketing Land, The Next Web, Fast Company, and dozens of other reputable sites.

In an effort to inform and refine your 2016 marketing strategies, I've summarized XXX key takeaways that will help you achieve your goals in the new year. Fastrack to our marketing research white papers here, or dive into the individual takeaways below:

I. The Emotions That Make Marketing Campaigns Go Viral

In order to understand the best emotional drivers to use in the content we create, we looked at 50 of the top 100 images of the year from Imgur, as voted on Reddit - a community of 9.4 million content voters. We then plotted the most common and strongest emotions using Robert Plutchik's Wheel of Emotion.

1. The strength of the emotional impact was a great indicator for the popularity of the content on Reddit. The top four most popular posts on Reddit also had the top four highest aggregate emotionality scores - the sum of the emotional strength scores.

2. The top 10 emotions were: amusement, interest, surprise, happiness, delight, pleasure, joy, hope, affection and excitement.

3. The bottom 10 emotions were: anger, politeness, frustration, doubt, embarrassment, despair, hurt, guilt, contempt, shame

4. 98% of the images spurred a positive emotion, while only 2% were negative.

5. Contrasting emotions increased the emotional impact. In the cases where negative emotions were present, they seemed to directly contrast positive emotions, enhancing the emotionality of the image through contrast.

6. Empathy acts as an emotional multiplier for content that elicits negative emotions.

7. Interest, surprise, and amusement act as emotional multipliers for positive emotions.

8. Admiration was very commonly found in highly shared content.

II. Consumer Survey on Effectiveness of Outbound vs Inbound Marketing

Fractl conducted an online survey of more than 1,000 people. Participants were asked 13 questions regarding their opinions on and recent engagement with various marketing media and tactics.

9. Close to 90% of people said they used online search to seek out more information about a company, and over 80% said they visit the company's website.

10. A whopping 93.2% used online search to find information about a company within the last week, and almost 90% had read an article about a company.

11. 54% said mobile app ads have a negative influence on their buying decisions.

12. Close to 60% of the people we surveyed used some form of ad blockers while browsing the web.

13. 54% of people reported they had not clicked on any ads within a week of being surveyed.

14. 77% are more likely to buy your product or service after learning about it through online search.

15. 57% are positively influenced by online articles--47.4% are slightly more likely to buy something they hear about via online articles.

16. Email marketing was most likely to negatively impact buying decisions, with 44% of respondents slightly less likely to buy something they hear about via email marketing.

17. 48% of people said "Appearing in search results when I'm looking for something I need or want," is one of the most effective ways for a company to attract the consumer's business.

18. Direct mail positively impacts buying decisions for just over 30%.

III. Reach, Engagement, and ROI of Content Marketing vs Native Advertising

We surveyed over 30 different content marketing agencies and analyzed native advertising cost data from close to 600 digital publishers.

19. 72% of clients have asked their content marketing agencies about native advertising.

20. The average cost of launching a native advertising program with a top-tier news publisher is $54,014.29. The highest cost was $200,000.

21. When we expanded our analysis to include all publishers who have a DA greater than 80, we found the average cost of launching a native advertising program was $35,482.50.

22. When we evaluate all publishers and blogs below a DA of 80, we see the less valuable publishers (lower reach) offer a significantly reduced cost. For sites with a DA less than 80, the highest cost was $20,000 and the lowest cost was $10.

23. 70% of content marketing agencies offer monthly retainers.

24. 48% of clients measure content marketing success by the number of leads, high-quality links, and total social shares generated by each campaign.

25. 39% use DA to evaluate the authority of a link.

26. Retainers tend to fall into four buckets: $1,000-$5,000, $5,000-$10,000, $10,000-$50,000, and $50,000-$100,000.

27. On average, 65% of agencies produce between 1 and 10 campaigns per month for each client.

28. Articles and infographics represent almost 60% of production, with case studies, interactive graphics, and videos accounting for close to 30% of production.

29. Excluding outliers, the average content marketing campaign earns 27 links.

30. The average for each agency's "most successful campaign" is 422 links and the median is 150 links.

IV. 500 Top-Tier Publishers Tell How To Get Press

We surveyed over 500 top-tier writers from sites like TIME, Huffington Post, and cNet to discover what they want from content creators and promoters.

31. Only 5% of writers wish they saw more press releases.

32. 64% of writers wish they saw more infographics, mixed-media, data visualizations, images, videos and interactive maps.

33. 39% of writers want campaigns that have exclusive research.

34. 27% of writers want a campaign that has breaking news.

35. 15% of writers want to publish a campaign that has high-arousal emotions.

36. 70% of writers would rather collaborate on an idea instead of getting pitched a finished asset.

37. On average, 45% of writers publish one story per day.

38. 40% of writers get pitched 20 times per day, while 8% of publishers in highly competitive verticals get pitched more than 100 times per day.

39. 10 verticals receive more than 300 pitches per day, with lifestyle receiving the bulk of the pitches at 26.1%.

40. Lifestyle, entertainment and technology verticals combined attract more than 50% of all high-volume pitches.

41. Editors receive more than 68% of all pitches, 7x more than bloggers or writers.

42. Only 5% of writers "never" write a story based on something that was sent through a pitch.

43. 64% of writers think it's important that you establish a personal connection before sending a pitch.

44. 66% of writers said they'd be more likely to open a pitch if you indicated a previous relationship in your subject line.

45. 81% of writers prefer that you send your pitch via email.

46. Less than 10% of writers said they prefer to be pitched on social media.

47. Only 5% of writers want you to call them with your pitch, and most of these writers were small blog owners.

48. 69% of writers prefer to be pitched in the morning hours.

49. 88% of writers want your pitch to be less than 200 words.

50. More than 85% of writers want the campaign's raw data to be included in your pitch.

51. 85% of writers said they would delete your pitch based on a spelling/grammar errors, regardless of your campaign's quality.

52. 85% of writers open an email based on its subject line.

53. More than 50% of writers want a subject line that is descriptive, specific, and tailored to their beat.

54. Almost 100% of respondents told us they were against sensationalist tones such as "This is incredible!" or "You won't believe what we found!".

55. 75% of writers want your subject line to be fewer than 10 words.

56. 42% of writers want your subject line to define the content format and title of what you're pitching, "The Selfie Phenomenon [Parallax]".

57. 29% of writers say a personalized subject line catches their attention the most, "You Have a Beer Chine, We Have Cowbell - RE: Exclusive Study".

58. 19% of writers say a statistic-based subject line catches their attention the most, "Kylie Jenner posted 451 selfies to Instagram [Celebrity Selfie Study]".

59. Only 10% of writers want you to mention their name in their subject line, "Hi [Name], I thought you might like this].

60. 87% of writers agree you should send one or two follow-up emails at most.

V. What 2.6 Billion Shares Reveals the Platforms and Publishers Dominating Social

We partnered with BuzzSumo to analyze the 1 million most-shared articles within a six-month timeframe. Collectively, these articles generated more than 2.6 billion shares on five social platforms.

61. The top million articles showed that the most engaged platforms, in order, were: 1. Facebook 2. Twitter 3. Google+ 4. Pinterest 5. LinkedIn

62. Facebook dominated both network size and engagement, generating more than 2.18 billion shares of the articles in our study--81% of the total shares generated.

63. Using Alchemy API, we determined that Pinterest and LinkedIn's content had the most positive sentiment, Twitter and Google+ had the most even distribution of emotions, and Facebook was the most negative when you removed publisher outliers.

64. BuzzFeed represented more than 400 million total shares, earning nearly 150 million more shares than second-place publisher Huffington Post.

65. 88% of publishers earned less than 25 million shares for all their top articles in the first half of the year--less than 1/16th of BuzzFeed's share volume.

66. Mashable, Forbes, and The New York Times were among the five most-shared publishers on three different networks; BuzzFeed and CNN each earned top-five spots on two different networks. No other publishers earned enough shares to rank in the top five of more than one network.

67. Most publishers averaged less than 5,000 shares per article, but Upworthy and ViralNova garnered an average of more than 60,000 shares per article.

VI. How to Build a Content Strategy to Earn more Social Shares

We analyzed 220 high- and low-engagement websites from 11 major verticals that produce content.

68. Business publications see the most shares on Tuesday.

69. Food followers share the most on Mondays.

70. Health peaks on Friday for high-engagement publishers, but Tuesday for low-engagement publishers.

71. LinkedIn earned 21% of shares for high-engagement publications in the business vertical.

72. Twitter earned 11% of shares for high-engagement tech publications, and 20-34% of shares for low-engagement business, finance, tech, and entertainment publications.

73. Pinterest ranked second for a mix of high- and low-engagement publishers in health, lifestyle, food, and education.

VII. How Individual Identity Influences What We Share

To get an idea of how people view and construct their identity through sharing on social media, we surveyed more than 1,000 people about different aspects of their online sharing habits and motivations with regard to personal identity.

74. 68% of women expect 11 or more likes or comments on their Facebook posts, compared with 61% of men.

75. 84% of respondents said "relationships" and "being a good friend to those I care about" are important to them when considering what content they share online--more than 20% said these factors are "extremely important."

76. 63% of respondents ranked their personal values and moral standards as "very" or "extremely important" when they shared content online.

77. 68% of participants said they had posted on social media between 1-7 times in the past week.

78. 42% said 1-3 of their posts were articles or media from third-party online publishers.

79. Millennials ranked their dreams, imagination, and goals higher than their older counterparts.

80. 41% of men said social identity was at least somewhat important, compared with 37% of women.

81. Millennials and Generation X (ages 18-50) placed more importance on their physical appearance, while the oldest age groups (ages 51 and above) gave it very little importance.

82. Fewer than 35% said their possessions--the things they own--were important in their content sharing.

IX. The Inbound Marketing Economy

We analyzed 75,315 inbound marketing job listings posted on Indeed.com during June 2015.

83. The number of profiles containing "content marketing" has seen the largest growth, with a 168% increase since 2013.

84. "PPC" returned the smallest number of results, with only 3.8% of listings containing this term.

85. "Social media" appears on a significantly higher volume of profiles than the other keywords, with more than 2.2 million profiles containing some mention of social media.

86. Although "SEO" has not seen as much growth as the other keywords, it still has the second-highest volume with it appearing in 630,717 profiles.

87. Digital marketing job listings have seen substantial growth since 2009, when it accounted for less than 0.1% of Indeed.com search results. In January 2015, this number had climbed to nearly 0.3%.

88. Jobs containing "digital marketing" or "inbound marketing" had the highest average salary of $84,000.

89. Jobs containing "SEO" and "Google Analytics" are tied for second with $76,000 as the average salary.

90. Massachusetts led the U.S. with the most jobs per capita for digital marketing, content marketing, SEO, and Google Analytics.

Source : http://www.inc.com/kelsey-libert/90-research-backed-tips-to-fuel-your-2016-marketing-strategy.html

The reality is that a successful marketing effort for any brand, even in 2016, involves both online and offline channels. Without a comprehensive strategy that involves "new school" and "old school" methods, companies risk losing market share to competitors that employ a more sweeping series of outreach efforts.

Showrooming and Webrooming Are Real Things You Need To Know

Nothing highlights the importance of a comprehensive marketing strategy more than the relatively new consumer practices of "showrooming" and "webrooming.

"Showrooming" is when customers visit a store in person to look for a product that they like. Then, when they've decided what they want to buy, they leave the store, return home, and order the product online.

"Webrooming" is the exact opposite of showrooming. That's when customers search for products online and, when they've found something that they like, they go to a local store and buy it in person.

It's important to understand those modern consumer practices because they demonstrate that modern shoppers are susceptible to both online and offline marketing efforts. Customers who practice showrooming and/or webrooming clearly prefer a "hybrid" strategy of digital and traditional shopping methods when it comes to making purchasing decisions.

That's why companies should adopt a "hybrid" strategy of marketing that includes both online and offline channels.

Consider This Scenario

A consumer goes online and searches for a product you sell with the intention to purchase. The consumer visits your site (through SEO or SEM) and likes what she sees. Your site also offers a link so she can see where the product is for sale nearby. She finds a store selling your product within 5 miles of where she lives. When she gets there, she sees your brand promoted with a visual that stands next to one of the aisles. She also recalls a radio ad she heard for your product two weeks ago that included testimonies from satisfied customers. She purchases your product.

That's how integrated marketing can benefit your brand.

Now, let's look at some offline marketing strategies that can increase your reach.

What You Need To Know About TV

TV advertisers were giddy last year when AdWeek reported on a study definitively proclaiming that "TV is still the most effective advertising medium."

Since Turner Broadcasting was a partner in that study, it might be a good idea to take the conclusion with a grain of salt. That aside, there's no doubt that multi-national corporations with money to perform marketing research still choose to advertise on television. So there's clearly a benefit to it.

Among the study's key findings:

  • TV has the highest efficiency at achieving Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) such as new accounts and sales
  • TV maintained its effectiveness over a 5-year period while other advertising mediums saw a significant decrease in effectiveness
  • TV advertisers can use data sources, such as inbound calls and website visits, as quasi-analytics to determine the effectives of their TV campaigns

Howard Shimmel, the chief research officer for the study, also went out of his way to emphasize the importance of an integrated marketing strategy.

"We're not saying that digital is bad," he said, "but digital just can't make up the reach that TV delivers. And digital, used in a way that's complementary to TV, is a more effective strategy."

Radio Is Probably Better Than You Think

Lots of marketers think of radio as the modern-day equivalent of the town crier. It's an antiquated medium that's lived out its usefulness.

Au contraire.

In fact, according to Nielsen, 93% of adults listen to radio each week. That's more than the number of people who watch TV (87%).

Of course, where there's people, there's likely to be people in your target market. That means radio is another opportunity for outreach.

According to another study, brands saw a $6 lift in sales for every $1 spent in radio advertising. One outlier even saw more than $23 in sales lift for every $1 spent on radio advertising.

Billboards Have A Unique Benefit Your Probably Don't Realize 

Billboards are a fantastic advertising medium because, unlike the other options we've seen, they're "non-interruptive."

They're part of the environment that the user sees when driving, bicycling, or walking somewhere. As a result, they're much less of an intrusion than other forms of marketing.

Additionally, billboards offer "path to purchase" marketing. For example, if someone is driving to the beach, he might see a billboard advertising a restaurant located at the beach. That's when he'll think to himself: "Hey, I'm hungry. Maybe I'll eat there."

So what makes for a successful billboard ad? A study released last year from the Graphic Communication Department of the California Polytechnic Institute found several common factors. Among them:

  • Few words - The study found that the average person only has about six seconds to "digest" the contents of the billboard. Follow Shakespeare's advice and recall that "brevity is the soul of wit."
  • Integration - It's best to use billboard ads in connection with other marketing channels.
  • Retention - Good billboards make consumers think about the message for at least a little while after drivers have seen them. An example cited in the study was Chik-Fil-A's "Beef Puts U 2 Sleep" billboard. That message led many drivers to ask themselves: "Wait. Does beef really put you to sleep?"
  • More is merrier - Less is not more when it comes to billboard advertising. It's best to run as many ads on billboards as your marketing budget will allow.

Magazines Are Not Dead At All, They Have An Impact

There's more than just blanket promises, though. An econometric modelling study conducted by Nielsen last year found that magazine advertising delivers a positive ROI and is cost-effective. Among the key findings:

  • During a three-year period, Magazine ad ROI increased 168%
  • Magazine ad's contribution to sales more than doubled, moving from 10% to 23%
  • When TV advertising and magazine advertising were combined, the ROI of TV ads increased by 18% 

Integrated Marketing Is A Must, I Have Seen It First-Hand

As we've seen, it's not good enough just to run offline and online campaigns. It's also important to ensure that they're integrated properly so that there's a consistent marketing message throughout all channels.

Nowadays, a favorite buzz-phrase for marketers is "omni-channel marketing." Briefly defined, omni-channel marketing is marketing across multiple channels with a similar theme. 

HubSpot cites Disney as a company that's excellent at omni-channel marketing. Disney has done a great job integrating online and offline elements in every step of the customer journey.

That kind of comprehensive omni-channel marketing might be out of your budget but that doesn't mean you can't use Disney's example for inspiration.

Bottom-line The Best Marketing Strategies Integrate Online and Offline

I have worked with hundreds of companies. The ones that do both offline and online marketing always see better results.

Source:  http://www.inc.com/john-lincoln/statistical-proof-that-internet-only-marketing-isnt-enough.html

Nearly everyone assumes the modern teen is internet obsessed.

Sure, 92% of teenagers report going online daily — including 24% who say they go online “almost constantly” — according to Pew Research data. But young millennials’ addiction to all things web doesn’t necessarily mean they’re a digital native. Nor is someone who just so happened to grow up in the Internet age.

So what exactly makes someone a “digital native”?

Marc Prensky, known for inventing and popularizing the terms “digital native” and “digital immigrant”, told Mashable the following: “The most important thing to realize is that this is a metaphor. It’s not a distinction or a brand, it’s extremely fluid.”

“Digital immigrants are people who grew up in one digital culture and moved into another,” Prensky explained. “Digital natives are people who grew up in one culture. They don’t have two cultures to compare.”

More than one meaning

Although Prensky explained the term was coined as a term to encompass the emerging digital native landscape in 2001, it has since evolved. According to Lee Rainie of Pew Research Center, its meaning is now hotly debated.

“Many notions and definitions have popped up in a number of places, and they’re often fairly contested,” said Rainie, the center’s Director of Internet, Science and Technology. “A native is someone who is totally aware and understands technology.”

Rainie goes on to explain that many scholars and analysts believe even though digital natives are good at using platforms and social media, they don't necessarily always know how to code or how these apps work.

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect of the concept “digital natives vs. immigrants” is the fact that it mostly has to do with the background and surroundings — not so much age of the person in question. Rainie, whose team has been tracking digital patterns for the past 16 years, says the “native vs. immigrant” divide essentially comes down to desktop compared to mobile-based usage.

“You can see how people who grew up in the age of wired computers differ from those who grew up with mobile technology,” she said.

Today’s youth is more likely to be digitally native than their parents or grandparents. This comes into play with things like using trendy social platforms and services, such as Snapchat, as opposed to Facebook (the traditional social platform) or email.

“You can see the differences inside families, too — even four or five-year age differences result in varying experiences with digital media,” Rainie said.

These variances have effects on the way they consume media. In the past couple of decades, historical events such as the Columbine high school shooting, the attacks on Sept. 11, the influence of the Bush Administration and the 2008 Presidential elections have all been documented differently according to the preferred media of their day, Rainie explains. Whereas the 9/11 attacks and Bush presidency were mainly documented through cable television and emerging online coverage, the historic 2008 Election ushered in an unprecedented era of digital coverage of politics, namely via social media.

Today, however, digital natives may not be necessarily tech savvy, but their sense of knowledge of what’s going on both digitally and culturally is what sets them up to be natives.

More often than not, teens have a self awareness of the privilege they have of growing up in an all-digital era. For 18-year-old Isabel Radice, acknowledging her access to the Internet for most of her life is something she doesn’t take lightly.

“I constantly talk about how much I love being born in the ‘Internet generation’ because it led me to meet people through online platforms — especially Tumblr and Twitter — who had similar interests,” she said. “From about the age of 14, I was able to connect with people from all over the world.”

Another Pew Research study shows 57% of teens have met a new friend online, while social media and online gameplay are the two top ways to meet friends digitally.

It’s also ushered in different career paths: “I love watching talks and reading articles online about Facebook’s algorithms; it helped me realize I have an interest in programming and coding,” Radice says.But overall, the online world is how digital natives form a good portion of their identity.

“I use Pinterest and read lot of beauty and music blogs,” Rachel Jefferson, 19, said. “I also discover the majority of bands I listen to through the internet, rather than by word of mouth.”

When it comes to this type of cultural grouping, it’s no secret embracing digital platforms has been popularized by younger demographics. Pew data suggests “those ages 18 to 29 have always been the most likely users of social media by a considerable margin.”

The takeaway

Overall, just because you grew up with the Internet, doesn’t mean you are a digital native.To fully consider someone a digital native points to the fact that “these people are deeply immersed into this world,” Rainie explains. “They see everything such as the benefits — the love, emotional side — and at the same time, they see the cyberbullying and harassments.”

At the end of the day, a digital native is someone who gets it, for all the good and bad that it offers.Prensky stresses “millennials should have a responsible sense of how empowered they are. Digital natives are can do things that older generations could just never do.”

Source:  http://mashable.com/2016/06/20/what-is-a-digital-native/#xO1YxMmChGqy

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