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Dorothy Allen

Dorothy Allen

1- Know What the Download Button Looks Like
 
Netflix

Netflix's extensive lineup of commercial-free, on-demand TV show episodes and movies makes it super convenient to watch something anywhere, anytime. In November of 2016, Netflix made it even more convenient to watch shows and movies by giving users the option to download them so they could watch them offline.

The Download Button Appears Beside or Beneath Each Title

If you've just installed or updated the Netflix app for Android or iOS, you should see an initial message telling you to look for the downward facing arrow symbol to download titles so you can watch them anywhere without having to worry about finding a Wi-Fi connection or using any data.

You won't see the download button anywhere on the main tab, but when you tap to view the details of a particular TV show or movie, you should be able to easily spot the download button. There should be a download button appearing to the right of each TV show episode while for movies, you should see the button directly beneath the Play button right beside My List and Share.

What About in a Web Browser?

The Netflix offline download feature is currently only available on the official Netflix mobile apps for Android and iOS. So if you access Netflix on the web or from another device like your Apple TV, you won't see any options to download titles.

2- Tap the Download Button to Download Content Instantly

Netflix

Once you've settled on a title to download, tap it and watch the icon turn blue as it shows you the progress of your download. A blue tab will also appear at the bottom of the screen to let you know what you're downloading.

When the download is fully finished, the blue, in-progress download button will turn into a blue device icon. It will say that the download has finished the tab at the bottom, and you'll be able to tap it to go to your downloads where you'll be able to tap the title you just downloaded to instantly watch it offline.

You'll notice that as you download different episodes of the same TV show, the show itself will appear in your downloads, which you can tap to see all your downloaded episodes in a separate tab. This keeps them organized so you don't have all downloaded episodes from different shows (plus movies) showing up in one tab.

3- Manage Your Downloads by Deleting What You've Watched

Netflix

You can access your downloads no matter where you are within the app by tapping the icon that looks like a hamburger in the top left corner to access the main menu and the tapping My Downloads.

As you download and watch different titles, you'll most likely want to delete the ones you've finished watching in order to keep your unwatched downloads easy to find and to free up space. To delete a title, simply tap the blue device icon to the right of the title then tap Delete Download from the menu options that appear at the bottom of the screen.

The limit to how many titles you can download depends on your device's local storage capacity. So, for example, if you're downloading Netflix titles on your 64GB iPhone but you've already used up 63GB, then you won't have much room to download lots of Netflix titles. If, however, your 64GB iPhone has 10GB of storage currently used up already, then you have lots room.

In your downloads, you'll be able to see how much space each title takes up. For TV shows in particular, you can see how much space you're using for all downloaded episodes of a certain show combined or you can tap the show to view individual episodes and how much space they use up.

4- Use Your App Settings to Save Storage

Netflix

When you navigate to App Settings from the main menu, there's an option to delete all downloads if you'd prefer to do it un bulk plus a legend that shows you how much space your device is using, how much of that space includes downloaded Netflix titles and how much free space you have left.

By default, the app has the Wi-Fi Only option turned on so that downloads will only occur when you're connected to wireless internet in order to help you save data, but you have the option to turn this off if you wish. Video quality is also set to standard by default to help you save storage, but you can also change this option to higher quality if you want an improved viewing experience and have no problem with storage limitations.

5- Check Out the 'Available for Download' Section
Netflix

In the main menu directly beneath the Home option, you'll see an option labeled Available for Download. This section will show you all the TV shows and movies that you can download to watch online whenever you're on the go.

Why Can't I Download My Favorite Show?

Unfortunately, not all Netflix titles will be available to download due to licensing restrictions, and you'll probably notice this when you fail to see the download button besides certain titles. Likewise, some downloads will expire, however those that do will give you a warning first in your downloads section.

Is There An Expiration Date?

Netflix doesn't specify which titles have expiration dates or time limits, so there's no guarantee that you'll be able to watch all 22 episodes in a season of a particular TV show that you downloaded before they're set to expire. Luckily, many downloadable titles are renewed on Netflix and will still be available to download even after they expire from your downloads section, so if you do happen to see titles expiring in your downloads section before you've watched them, you should be able to tap the exclamation point icon beside the expired title to re-download it.

Source: This article was published on lifewire.com by Elise Moreau

Adventurous people out there have the resources to explore the farthest reaches of the Earth. But while it seems every last spot will get explored, researched, and photographed, there do remain some places that have barely been touched—or haven't been seen at all. From the deepest depths to the highest peaks, these virgin territories are still out there to spark your imagination and wanderlust.

Gangkhar Puensum, Bhutan

This impressive peak on the border of Tibet and Bhutan is the 40th-highest-mountain in the world and has yet to be summited.

According to history records, aspiring climbers of days past had trouble even locating the 24,280-foot mountain. Maps were pretty inaccurate for quite a long time, and even after people knew where it was, it still proved nigh-impossible to conquer. It's very cold and windy, and there's a ridge before the top that's really really steep. In 1985, a team from Britain attempted the climb, but crew members got sick and had to turn back. In 1986, a monsoon stopped an Austrian climbing team.

In 1987, the government in Bhutan banned climbing Gangkhar Puensum totally. This is because it is said that powerful spirits inhabit the mountain's peak. Those inclined to believe in the supernatural devour stories of strange lights, ghostly figures, magnetic anomalies and even Yeti on the way up the allowed 6,000 meters from the top.

Undeterred by the rumors, a Japanese group of climbers got permission from the Chinese Mountaineering Association to climb the unclimbable mountain from the Tibetan approach. The Bhutanese side disputed this permission, and the group settled for climbing the peak just north of Gangkhar Puensum, known as Gangkhar Puensum North. Even though that peak was also previously unclimbed, the group leader, Tamostsu Nakamura, expressed regret that they could not climb Gangkhar Puensum. No one has gotten as close as they did, and it's possible that no one ever will.

The Mariana Trench

The Mariana Trench is located in the Pacific Ocean, off of Japan and is the deepest place on the entire planet. Just to give some perspective, the Arctic Ocean is 3.407 feet deep, with the Eurasian Basin Trench at 17.881 feet. The Indian Ocean is 12,740 feet deep, with the Java Trench at 25,344 feet deep. The Atlantic Ocean is 12,254 feet deep with the Puerto Rican Trench at 28,374 feet deep. The Pacific Ocean is 12,740 feet deep, and the Mariana Trench is a staggering 36,201 feet deep. Mount Everest, which is the tallest mountain in the world, if placed at the bottom of the Mariana Trench, would still have 7,176 feet of water above it.

The trench was created when one tectonic plate topped with oceanic crust subducted (it slid under) another. It was first discovered in 1951 by the HMS Challenger II, which is why the deepest point is called Challenger Deep.

In 1960, Swiss scientist Jacques Piccard and US Navy Lt Colonel Donald Walsh traveled to the bottom of Challenger Deep in a submarine designed by Piccard's father. It was called the Trieste, and the design was pretty genius. They used gasoline in the submarine's floats, because gasoline is lighter than water. They reached the bottom with 16.000 pounds of pressure per square inch then headed back to the top. More recently, film titan James Cameron launched an expedition to the floor of the Mariana Trench called DeepSea Challenge. Cameron himself traveled to the bottom in a custom submersible that he helped design, and he went with cameras, unlike the 1960s expedition. He filmed lots of squishy creatures, and the discovery of a new species of sea cucumber may have come of his efforts. But since the Trench is still almost entirely unexplored, there are plenty of things we still don't know there, and some discoveries could give us a glimpse as to how our whole world started.

Oodaaq Island, Greenland

There are six total "visited" islands north of Kaffeklubben, Greenland. "Visited" means that someone, at some point, set foot on them, but whether they still exist is up for debate. Confused? Read on.

Take, for instance, Oodaaq Island. It was discovered in 1978 by Uffe Petersen, a Danish geodesist mapping north Greenland with his team. They were hanging out on Kaffeklubben, thought to be the northernmost of the Greenland islands, when they saw a speck out yonder. North! They flew over, and sure enough, there was an "island" there. Well, really a gravel bar, but it counted. Petersen named it after an Eskimo sledge driver who'd been part of Robert Peary's North Pole expedition in 1909. While some sources say it hasn't been seen since it was discovered, that's not technically true.

Fast-forward to the early 2000s, when Dr. Peter Skaffe, a Danish anthropologist, was filming and studying the northern islands. Even though an expedition in the sea north of Kaffeklubben saw no trace of Oodaaq, Skaffe found that only eight days later, his camera had caught a glimpse of the small island. Will Oodaaq be visible more often with the melting arctic regions, or will it disappear completely? Probably best to hang on Kaffeklubben instead and check out the crazy arctic flowers.

Machapuchare, Nepal

In the Annapurna Himalayas, there's a sacred mountain that the Nepalese have made off limits to climbers. It's called Machapurchare, or "Fish Tail Mountain."

In 1957, Wilfrid Noyce and A.D.M. Cox climbed Machapuchare, but they didn't go to the top. Not that they couldn't have, physically. Noyce was, after all the first to climb Everest. But the mountain is sacred because Lord Shiva lives on the top, and that's pretty serious. Nepal's king asked Noyce and his partner not to go all the way up, and they agreed. That was, of course, the only gentlemanly thing to do.

Climbers say Bill Denz, a rogue climber from New Zealand, didn't give a hoot about what the Hindus held sacred and went all the way to the top in the early 1980s. Denz died on Mansaw, another Himalayan mountain, in 1983, so we'll never really know for sure. We have a written account, however, of Noyce's experience, as he wrote a book called Climbing the Fish's Tail.

While you can't climb this sacred mountain to its summit, you can do plenty in the base camp. The mountain is in the Annapurna Conservation Area. That, combined with the peak's religious significance, makes Machapuchare perhaps the last pristine mountain in the Himalayas. Since humans ruin everything, if we could get up there, we'd probably wreck it. Look at Mt Everest, after all. It's estimated that climbers have left behind 12 tons of human poo, 50 tons of garbage and quite a few frozen corpses on that famous mountain. We suck.

Northern Mountain Forest Complex, Myanmar

High in the mountains of Myanmar, the Hkakabo Razi National Park and Hponkan Razi Wildlife Sanctuary make up the Northern Mountain Forest Complex, and the World Heritage Convention proposes to expand the area to include a southern extension of the national park, to create an area of over 7,000 square miles.

A study out of Cambridge found that less than 1.4 percent of the existing forest area in this region of Myanmar is affected by humans, which is pretty extraordinary, though this does not include hunters. So, when we say this area is unexplored, it means that the flora and fauna and wildlife have not been studied, and the area has not been explored by scientific or climbing communities. That doesn't mean that poachers out for tiger parts and other animal products to sell in China haven't set foot in these lush and vibrant forests.

Even though almost half of Myanmar is still covered in forest area, deforestation is a real problem, as is the destruction of wildlife population. Scientists have recently uncovered video footage, of red pandas, and it was apparent that their habitat is declining, even though there are parts of Myanmar that are virtually unexplored.

Antarctica's subglacial lakes

First discovered in 1973, massive subglacial lakes in Antarctica have fascinated scientists for years. While there are now 400 known subglacial lakes in the 5 million square miles of frozen area, plenty are not known. Also unknown are the ins and outs of the complex ecosystem that thrives under so many thousands of feet of ice.

It was very important to Russian scientists to be the first to get a sample from a subglacial lake, and they started digging into Lake Vostok in 1953. The drilling was suspended in the late 1990s, but it seems that they're making good headway now.

Another successful experiment was conducted on Lake Whillans by a microbial ecologist from Montana State University, John Priscu. He got a sample from almost a half mile under the ice and reported that the ecosystem was, indeed, absolutely thriving. While there's so much unexplored and unknown about these ancient, frozen lakes, they're on scientific radars across disciplines and countries, and it's expected that easier access will exist by 2035. So, that's one upside to the whole world melting.

Source: This article was published on grunge.com

Google has released the Google Assistant SDK to the public. This means any user can now run Google Assistant virtually anywhere, including PC, using the Google Chrome AutoVoice extension.  ( Google )

Heads up, Cortana. Google Assistant is coming to PC via Google Chrome.

The erstwhile mobile-exclusive personal assistant is coming to all devices, now that Google has made its software development kit public. Through the Google Chrome extension AutoVoice, Google Assistant can now be used on PCs. It takes time to set up, but it opens up a myriad of uses via voice commands.

AutoVoice And Google Assistant

AutoVoice developer João Dias posted in his blog a video showing him interacting with Google Assistant on his PC using AutoVoice for Chrome. According to him, because the AutoVoice extension is "always listening," users can utilize any wake-up phrase if they want to call Google Assistant. Then, they can use the normal commands they use on other Google Assistant devices.

In the video, Dias asked Assistant "Hey, Google. What can you do?" to which Assistant replied "I can do lots of things." The Assistant then offered several options such as checking the calendar, playing a music from a playlist, or reading the latest news.

The setup looks neat, but it can be quite a workload for those without technical know-how. The setup takes two steps: one, getting Assistant onto the PC; and two, syncing it with AutoVoice.

To get Assistant on PC, a tutorial is available in the XDA developers' page. Again, this is not an easy task as Google only released the SDK to developers, thus installing requires tinkering with the API and other coding stuff. For the AutoVoice, it is available online via the Google Chrome extension store.

Afterward, the setup will require one more tweaking, as some command lines must be written to install the special AutoVoice version of the Google Assistant. Thankfully, Dias shared a tutorial.

AutoVoice is a Google Chrome extension and Tasker app plugin that performs tasks via voice commands. These tasks include playing music or redirecting calls to a Bluetooth headset.

Google Assistant

Google Assistant is another name in the growing line of virtual assistants. Introduced in 2016, Google Assistant is Google's answer to Cortana, Siri, and Alexa. It debuted as part of the messaging app Allo, then moved to Google flagship phones Pixel and Pixel XL.

It was then deployed to other Android platforms, including Android Wear. This April, it was made available for developers when its SDK was made public.

Touted as a next-gen version of Google Now, which is basically a voice-activated Google search, Google Assistant adds interaction to the one-way feature of Now. Via voice commands, it can perform simple tasks like suggesting restaurants, playing music, opening up calendar reminders, and opening apps.

Source: This article was published on techtimes.com

When it comes to search, there's Google and there's everyone else -- the company is basically synonymous with searching the internet. But Omnity, a relatively new company from San Francisco, thinks own search that's based on "semantic mapping" offers something that Google can't do. Omnity's trick is that it looks for the connections between documents on the internet based on rare words -- the theory that research that has several of the same rare words will likely be about related topics, even if that research doesn't directly link to or cite each other.

Thus far, Omnity has operated primarily by selling enterprise plans to companies and educational institutions. Omnity can search not only all of the public datasets it scans (like patents, scientific, engineering and medical documents, clinical trials, case law, SEC filings and so forth) but also a company's internal documents -- for some companies, Omnity indexes 150 petabytes of data.

That may be useful to massive institutions, but plenty of ordinary people could benefit from Omnity's research features -- so today, the company has announced that anyone can search the public databases it indexes for free. Omnity groups the free datasets into four groups: biomedicine, engineering, finance and law, and each set pulls from a wide variety of publicly available sources. Previously, the company offered limited demo searches for free, but now anyone can look up whatever they want.

Once you've signed up for a free Omnity account, you can initiate a search by typing in the Google-like search bar. You'll be served up results grouped by primary sources (those directly related to your query) and secondary sources (documents that share key vocabulary with the primary documents). From there, Omnity offers lots of different ways of visualizing the connections between various documents so you can see what's most potentially related before diving down the research long tail.

There are a lot of ways to extend your search from there, including clicking a word cloud to see specific documents containing those words or seeing a map which shows where the research originated. But one of Omnity's most interesting features is that you can upload documents of your own for it to analyze. Once the document is uploaded, it'll automatically look for those "rare words" and find other documents in its databases that match up with the one you added yourself. It's worth noting that those documents you upload stay private to you -- they aren't added to Omnity's overall database.

This adds up to a search tool that's decidedly not for your average, day-to-day basic informational queries. But, if you work in a field and spend lots of time going down the rabbit hole of the internet, it's entirely possible Omnity can reveal documents that you might have otherwise missed using a traditional keyword-based search engine like Google.

Students and researchers alike may find the tool useful -- and now that it's fully open and free, there's no reason not to give it a shot. And Omnity expects this free version to serve as a good proof-of-concept for its work with larger enterprise companies. If a company or university gets hooked on the free version, it'll probably be a lot easier for Omnity to show them the benefits of its paid service.

Auhtor : Nathan Ingraham

Sourcehttps://www.engadget.com/2016/12/13/omnity-rare-word-search-engine-goes-free/

Thursday, 24 November 2016 01:14

The 8 best mobile phones of 2016

With dozens of different handsets battling for our attention, there is more choice when it comes to buying a new smartphone than ever.

Here is the Telegraph's pick of the best handsets, from the budget to the high end of the market.

8. OnePlus 3

OnePlus 3

Screen: 5.5 inches
Camera: 16MP
Battery (talk time): N/A

Previously seen as the budget option that didn't quite live up to the big boys, OnePlus's latest handset is not quite so budget, but also a significant improvement on recent years. Its design and quality is excellent and it comes with useful features like NFC and fast charging.

While it isn't world-beating in any one area, at its price range the OnePlus 3 is a truly excellent phone that can live up to its far more expensive rivals.

Pros: Brilliant value, premium design

Cons: Battery life can be iffy

Price: £386.99

Buy now

7. HTC 10

HTC 10

Screen: 5.2 inches
Camera: 12MP
Battery (talk time): 27 hours

The HTC 10 sports what the company claims to be one of the most advanced smartphone cameras available, with a 5MP front-facing lens and 12MP rear-facing one, both of which have optical image stabilisation. Its biggest selling point is perhaps its advertised two-day battery life, although tests have shown this isn't always the case.

Apart from that, its best properties are its sleek metal design, usable version of Android and great audio, especially when playing through the phone's speakers. It ticks almost all the boxes, but it is still difficult to recommend it above rival offerings from Samsung.

Pros: Battery life, fantastic audio

Cons: Camera doesn't quite match up to best

Price: £569.99

Buy now

6. iPhone SE

iPhone SE
CREDIT: BLOOMBERG

Screen: 4 inches
Camera: 12MP
Battery (talk time): 14 hours

Apple's smaller iPhone, unveiled in March, doesn't have many of the newest features of the 7 or even 6s: 3D Touch, for example, is missing, and there's no water resistance (although yes, there is a headphone jack).

There are two reasons you might choose it, though: At 4 inches, the smaller-handed may well prefer its screen, and at £379 it is significantly cheaper.

Pros: The best value iPhone on the market, best small-screen phone you can get

Cons: Lacks some of the recent iPhones' features

Price: £379

Buy now

5. Google Pixel phone

Google's Pixel phone
Google's Pixel phone CREDIT: GOOGLE

Screen: 5 and 5.5 inches
Camera: 12MP
Battery (talk time): 26 hours

Google's first own-brand phone, the Pixel is joins the higher end of the Android market. Said to have "the best smartphone camera ever", the Pixel and Pixel XL come with unlimited photo storage, a long battery life, Google's intelligent Assistant, and a headphone jack. 

The phones run Google's clean version of Android, which many see as the best experience of the software and is the first to get updates to the operating system. 

As the Pixel phone isn't out just yet we haven't had a chance to do a full review, but based on our initial impressions it's a good phone with high-end specs and one of the closest iPhone competitors you'll get in the Android range. That said, it may be a bit pricey for a phone that feels like an iPhone copy.  

Pros: Run's Google's unskinned Android, great camera, unlimited photo storage, 

Cons: Looks and feels a bit like a cheaper iPhone, expensive

Price: £599

Pre-order now

4. Moto G4

Moto G4

Screen: 5.5 inches
Camera: 13MP
Battery (talk time): N/A

The Moto G4 is solidly at the budget end of the market, but you get a lot of phone for your outlay. The screen, camera and processor are all worthy of a phone well above the £169 RRP, and it is certainly enough for many people out there.

Of course, at that price there are some compromises. Not everyone appreciates the design and the phone looks a little outdated compared to some of the best high-end handsets, but at its price it really is spectacular value.

Pros: Unbelievable price

Cons: Design is not everyone's cup of tea

Price: £169

Buy now

3. iPhone 7

iPhone 7

Screen: 4.7 inches 
Camera: 12MP 
Battery (talk time): 14 hours

Many people hold Apple responsible for the modern smartphone and it continues to make some of the world's best handsets. The combination of elegant design and its iOS software, as well as compatibility with the Mac, iPad and Apple Watch put the iPhone consistently at the top of best-buy guides.

2016's iPhone 7 is no exception. With water resistance, an upgraded camera and stereo speakers, it's also a worthy upgrade to last year's 6s. However, it hasn't been universally popular - the headphone jack is gone, and users have complained about battery life.

Pros: Water resistant, improved camera, jet black design

Cons: No headphone jack, battery life is not the best

Price: £599

Buy now

2. iPhone 7 Plus

iPhone 7 Plus

Screen: 5.5 inches
Camera: 12MP
Battery (talk time): 21 hours

For the last two years, the "Plus" model of Apple's iPhone has simply been a bigger version with a 5.5-inch screen, as opposed to the 4.7 inches of the standard handset. With the iPhone 7 Plus, though, the differences are starker: there's more RAM, and most significantly, a new dual-lens camera.

The camera allows greatly-improved zoomed in photos, as well as a new portrait mode, that blurs the background of photos while focusing on the subject. While the effect is already being hotly debated in photography circles, the dual camera as well as the Plus's bigger battery, makes it a clear winner over the smaller iPhone 7 for those who can deal with big handsets.

Pros: Outstanding camera, better battery than iPhone 7

Cons: Too big for many, no headphone jack

Price: £719

Buy now

1. Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge

Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge

Screen: 5.5 inches
Camera: 12MP
Battery (talk time): 27 hours

After its predecessor, the Galaxy S6, proved a disappointment in sales terms, Samsung returned this year with the S7 as well as its curved-screen sibling the S7 Edge. The phones are widely regarded as some of the finest Samsung has built, bringing back the SD card and improving the battery life.

The S7 Edge is the pick of the two, with a curved design that really stands out and an excellent camera, although it is more expensive. On the other hand, it is pricey and, per Samsung, comes with its usual array of unwanted extra software.

Pros: Great design, water resistance

Cons: Loaded with unnecessary Samsung apps

Price: £639

Buy now

Source : http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Author : Telegraph Reporters

When billionaire entrepreneur Peter Thiel bucked the trend of Silicon Valley by throwing his cash and support behind Donald Trump, Mark Zuckerberg had some explaining to do.

As one of Facebook’s board members, Thiel’s move sparked criticism among the ultra liberal tech community of California. “There are many reasons a person might support Trump that do not involve racism, sexism, xenophobia or accepting sexual assault,” Zuckerberg, who launched Facebook in 2004, wrote in an internal company memo.

While Trump’s views on building walls and lack of belief in climate change are well documented, the president elect’s stance on the issues that will directly affect technology firms, and by extension, much of the world are less obvious.

Try Newsweek for only $1.25 per week

Cybersecurity

Trump has promised to immediately make cybersecurity a top priority, citing concerns about cyberattacks from the likes of China and North Korea. His written policies on cybersecurity are summed up in four bullet points that lack any concrete detail, but include the promise to develop cyber weapons.

It states: “Develop the offensive cyber capabilities we need to deter attacks by both state and non-state actors and, if necessary, to respond appropriately.”

According to Uri Rivner, head of cyber strategy at biometrics firm BioCatch, Trump will take such threats seriously and combating them will be high on the future administration’s agenda.

“Cyber threats to both critical infrastructure and financial systems are just the sort of clear and present danger that requires decisive action—the likes of which the president elect has been advocating,” Rivner tells Newsweek . “This in turn may lead to more aggressive cyber security policies, faster response to cyber attack campaigns, and greater investment in cyber security defenses.”

It remains unclear how clued up Trump is on the actual issues and specific threats facing his administration. On the occasion that he has vocalized his thoughts on cybersecurity, there is little to suggest a clear or informed perspective.

This is what Trump had to say at the first debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: “I have a son. He’s 10 years old. He has computers, it’s unbelievable. The security aspect of cyber is very, very tough. And maybe it’s hardly doable.”Barron Trump to head his father’s administration on cybersecurity, anyone?

Net Neutrality and Internet Freedom

Trump’s anti-regulation stance may well have an effect on internet service providers and the Federal Communications Commission's rules on net neutrality—the principle that Internet Service Providers should treat all internet traffic equally..

In 2014, Trump described the rules as an “attack on the internet” by President Obama, suggesting he may roll back the rules once in office.

Source:  newsweek.com

Want to reach search engine users in their moments of need? Columnist Thomas Stern explains his process for mapping keywords and content to the customer's path to purchase.

Google introduced the concept of micro-moments over a year ago, and since then, the company has consistently published supporting information as it relates to specific industries and user behavior across content platforms. 

If you’re unfamiliar with micro-moments, they’re essentially a way of framing a user’s path to purchase or to conversion, with specific focus on mobile and the needs or questions users search on Google along with way. The concept of micro-moments is easily digestible and provides a great way of conducting and organizing keyword research, something search marketing practitioners and decision-makers alike can certainly appreciate.

At our agency, ZOG Digital, we’ve been developing ways to comprehensively identify micro-moment opportunities for clients while mapping and optimizing to the consumer’s conversion path. The following is a high-level look at our approach and a few of the resources we use. 

1. Identifying micro-moments: The consumer journey

Before you can identify micro-moment opportunities, you must understand the structure or user path and adapt it to your particular business or vertical. For instance, we categorize micro-moments for hospitality clients into Dreaming, Exploring, Planning and Booking; these buckets support each step in the consumer journey to bookings, and keyword opportunities can logically be categorized within them.

identifying

identifying

Google uses a fairly ubiquitous micro-moment structure of “I want to know,” “I want to go,” “I want to do” and “I want to buy.” Unlike the categorization structure I noted above, Google’s classification maps micro-moments to different types of consumer journeys with additional research to support best practices for search content. 

Either of these examples can work, as long as consumer intent can be appropriately segmented. Keywords are the backbone of this phase and enable future content to be planned, developed and published by each opportunity category. 

2. Organizing micro-moments: Defining parameters and collecting data

With keyword categorization structure understood, the next step is to map out the keyword modifiers that users will use in their path to conversion. Our philosophy is to use all available modifiers, with an understanding that not all will apply to each client. This approach allows us to cast the widest net and effectively understand the micro-moment opportunity size. 

Here are some example modifiers grouped under questions and prepositions: 

Questions: (Keyword) + Where, Which, Who, Why, What, How and Are

Example hospitality-related searches using questions could be “Things to Do in San Francisco” or “Where to Stay in Miami.”

sfo-

sfo

Prepositions: (Keyword) + With, Without, Versus, Near, Like and For.

Example retail-based searches using prepositions could be “Tablet vs. Laptop” or “Ceiling Fan with Lights.”

tablet laptop-

tablet_laptop

At ZOG Digital, we predefine all keyword modifiers so we can map across keyword lists at scale. However, if you’re looking to define micro-moments across a small set of keywords, we recommend Answer the Public and Keyword.io as great starting points. Answer the Public predefines questions and prepositions automatically, while Keyword.io allows you to segment keyword results by questions once they’ve been retrieved.

It’s important to note that collecting micro-moment data doesn’t stop at the keyword level. To effectively understand opportunity size and prioritize tactics, consumer intent and demand needs to be identified and grouped within the aforementioned consumer journey stages. This research process provides a segue into our next step, which is building a plan for ROI.

3. Forecasting and prioritizing for ROI

The next step to moving forward with micro-moment opportunity analysis and planning is to forecast potential and prioritize for ROI. My agency developed our own tool, the Keyword Revenue Forecasting Tool, to automate this process with historical client performance data, but a basic one can be created through Excel and a few simple formulas.

First, you’ll need to determine a click-through rate by keyword position. There are numerous data sources for this — we like Advanced Web Ranking, as they regularly update their CTR data. The best option, if you have enough data, is to use Search Console and filter out branded keywords. This will then most closely resemble the CTR you can expect from each keyword position.

Keyword-Revenue-Forecast

keyword-revenue-forecast-1

Second, you need to forecast how your rankings can improve over time. This is a bit tricky without substantial historical data, so the next best option is to look at where similar websites rank for the keywords you’re targeting. Check the domain and PageRank of the websites that rank in the top positions for each keyword. If you are within range comparatively, chances are that you have a likelihood of competing, assuming you’re conducting comprehensive on- and off-page optimization.

The improvement over time is tricky here — if you have performed SEO in the past for the site, you should be conservative and make assumptions based on performance you have observed historically.

Keyword-Revenue-

keyword-revenue-forecast-2

Finally, you can now calculate potential return based on the metrics you have available:

(keyword position CTR) x (keyword search volume) x (organic conversion rate) x (organic average order value)

When possible, we like to make these calculations at a categorical level, applying unique conversion rate and average order volume (AOV) data to get the most accurate results.

4. Content analysis and selection

After assessing the value of keywords and micro-moments, one final step needs to occur before defining content topics and types. It’s important to examine and dissect the search results and content that currently exists for each keyword. Because Google takes into account the context of each search term and displays the most relevant results, the types of results revealed will give you an idea of the intent behind the query.

For example, a search term with modifiers like “best” or “top” may imply the user is seeking an article, blog post or list, while a search term that includes modifiers like “discount” or “buy” may suggest the user is looking for a product page.

Inspecting content types indexed in search results can inform future content that will succeed at each stage of the consumer journey. Particularly, deciphering content trends for each phase will inform the long-term content strategy for brands and agencies to begin building together.

With micro-moments inspired by Google, savvy marketers can see the consumer journey through a new lens and gain further insights from keyword categorization. Google has recently published an article, “Micro-Moments: 5 Questions to Ask Your Agency,” that concisely summarizes many of the aforementioned steps and recommendations. We highly encourage reviewing for assessing agency partners and internal teams alike.

Source : searchengineland

If you’re unfamiliar with micro-moments, they’re essentially a way of framing a user’s path to purchase or to conversion, with specific focus on mobile and the needs or questions users search on Google along with way. The concept of micro-moments is easily digestible and provides a great way of conducting and organizing keyword research, something search marketing practitioners and decision-makers alike can certainly appreciate.

At our agency, ZOG Digital, we’ve been developing ways to comprehensively identify micro-moment opportunities for clients while mapping and optimizing to the consumer’s conversion path. The following is a high-level look at our approach and a few of the resources we use.

1. Identifying micro-moments: The consumer journey

Before you can identify micro-moment opportunities, you must understand the structure or user path and adapt it to your particular business or vertical. For instance, we categorize micro-moments for hospitality clients into Dreaming, Exploring, Planning and Booking; these buckets support each step in the consumer journey to bookings, and keyword opportunities can logically be categorized within them.

identifying

Google uses a fairly ubiquitous micro-moment structure of “I want to know,” “I want to go,” “I want to do” and “I want to buy.” Unlike the categorization structure I noted above, Google’s classification maps micro-moments to different types of consumer journeys with additional research to support best practices for search content.

Either of these examples can work, as long as consumer intent can be appropriately segmented. Keywords are the backbone of this phase and enable future content to be planned, developed and published by each opportunity category.

2. Organizing micro-moments: Defining parameters and collecting data

With keyword categorization structure understood, the next step is to map out the keyword modifiers that users will use in their path to conversion. Our philosophy is to use all available modifiers, with an understanding that not all will apply to each client. This approach allows us to cast the widest net and effectively understand the micro-moment opportunity size.

Here are some example modifiers grouped under questions and prepositions:

Questions: (Keyword) + Where, Which, Who, Why, What, How and Are

Example hospitality-related searches using questions could be “Things to Do in San Francisco” or “Where to Stay in Miami.”

sfo

Prepositions: (Keyword) + With, Without, Versus, Near, Like and For.

Example retail-based searches using prepositions could be “Tablet vs. Laptop” or “Ceiling Fan with Lights.”

tablet_laptop

At ZOG Digital, we predefine all keyword modifiers so we can map across keyword lists at scale. However, if you’re looking to define micro-moments across a small set of keywords, we recommend Answer the Public and Keyword.io as great starting points. Answer the Public predefines questions and prepositions automatically, while Keyword.io allows you to segment keyword results by questions once they’ve been retrieved.

It’s important to note that collecting micro-moment data doesn’t stop at the keyword level. To effectively understand opportunity size and prioritize tactics, consumer intent and demand needs to be identified and grouped within the aforementioned consumer journey stages. This research process provides a segue into our next step, which is building a plan for ROI.

3. Forecasting and prioritizing for ROI

The next step to moving forward with micro-moment opportunity analysis and planning is to forecast potential and prioritize for ROI. My agency developed our own tool, the Keyword Revenue Forecasting Tool, to automate this process with historical client performance data, but a basic one can be created through Excel and a few simple formulas.

First, you’ll need to determine a click-through rate by keyword position. There are numerous data sources for this — we like Advanced Web Ranking, as they regularly update their CTR data. The best option, if you have enough data, is to use Search Console and filter out branded keywords. This will then most closely resemble the CTR you can expect from each keyword position.

keyword-revenue-forecast-1

Second, you need to forecast how your rankings can improve over time. This is a bit tricky without substantial historical data, so the next best option is to look at where similar websites rank for the keywords you’re targeting. Check the domain and PageRank of the websites that rank in the top positions for each keyword. If you are within range comparatively, chances are that you have a likelihood of competing, assuming you’re conducting comprehensive on- and off-page optimization.

The improvement over time is tricky here — if you have performed SEO in the past for the site, you should be conservative and make assumptions based on performance you have observed historically.

keyword-revenue-forecast-2

Finally, you can now calculate potential return based on the metrics you have available:

(keyword position CTR) x (keyword search volume) x (organic conversion rate) x (organic average order value)

When possible, we like to make these calculations at a categorical level, applying unique conversion rate and average order volume (AOV) data to get the most accurate results.

4. Content analysis and selection

After assessing the value of keywords and micro-moments, one final step needs to occur before defining content topics and types. It’s important to examine and dissect the search results and content that currently exists for each keyword. Because Google takes into account the context of each search term and displays the most relevant results, the types of results revealed will give you an idea of the intent behind the query.

For example, a search term with modifiers like “best” or “top” may imply the user is seeking an article, blog post or list, while a search term that includes modifiers like “discount” or “buy” may suggest the user is looking for a product page.

Inspecting content types indexed in search results can inform future content that will succeed at each stage of the consumer journey. Particularly, deciphering content trends for each phase will inform the long-term content strategy for brands and agencies to begin building together.

With micro-moments inspired by Google, savvy marketers can see the consumer journey through a new lens and gain further insights from keyword categorization. Google has recently published an article, “Micro-Moments: 5 Questions to Ask Your Agency,” that concisely summarizes many of the aforementioned steps and recommendations. We highly encourage reviewing for assessing agency partners and internal teams alike.

Monday, 10 October 2016 07:36

Workforce of the future update

It’s 2009. I’m in a parking lot in Winchester, Virginia, with Ed Helvey: writer, speaker, audio engineer, producer, book publisher and freelancer-at-large. He’s just finished selling off enough books, audio equipment, furniture and other “stuff” to fill a small warehouse. Amidst all the selling, he was proudly showing me one of his few purchases—a ’94 Ford high-top conversion van, completely empty in the back except for an old, faded captain’s chair.

Fast-forward to 2016, Winchester, Virginia. Different parking lot, same van. Only now it’s fully outfitted as an all-in-one home, office, studio and motor coach.

From editing and producing audio programs to taking in breathtaking vistas as he travels across the United States (47 states and counting), he does it all in a space of about 50 square feet. Funny how when you decide to “live freely” (his blog site is 2livefreely.com), you discover how small a footprint you really need. And as you might have guessed, he tends to bounce around the southern states in the winter and northern states in the summer.

The rise of the nomadic knowledge worker

Ed calls himself a “professional nomad.” When people ask him where he lives or works his answer is always the same: “Wherever my van happens to be parked.”

Here’s the surprise. When Ed began his journey seven years ago, he thought he was an outlier. Instead he found a booming subculture made up of thousands of people just like him. Folks from all walks of life who have decided to live and work in an untethered, “free range” world. People who roam the highways and byways in everything from station wagons to motor homes to even the latest craze, “tiny houses.”

He begins to rattle off a long list of his fellow nomads. And, yes, they are well networked in true self-organizing fashion. One composes and edits background music for a major syndicated television series. Another, a retired nurse, travels around the country in a converted school bus that includes a Jacuzzi and a small woodworking shop where he makes custom wood pieces and signs for a small Internet following he’s built up among RV owners. And there are countless others who are either semi-retired or who have simply decided to drop out of the “rat race.”

This is a trend you can’t ignore. Even if you prefer a nice, stationary dwelling for yourself, the chances are increasing that the talent you’ll be seeking is already “out there,” somewhere on the road.

A look at the numbers

Today’s workforce is more part-time and mobile than ever. And the numbers are growing. The Wall Street Journal recently reported that since 2005, the number of people working as part-time consultants or contractors (as opposed to traditional W-2 employees) has climbed by more than half, to nearly 16 percent of the total workforce. That includes a 100 percent increase in the manufacturing sector and a 300 percent increase in the field of public administration.

But it’s mobility that’s completely transforming the workplace. According to IDC, the number of mobile workers in the United States—anyone who works outside the traditional office—will grow from 96.2 million in 2015 to 105.4 million in 2020, roughly 72 percent of the total U.S. workforce.

Of course, you don’t have to be mobile to participate in this new “gig economy,” as it’s being called. For example, a growing number of researchers working for various think tanks are finding the word adjunct added to their job title. Similar to adjunct faculty in universities, they work as needed, typically on-site, on a per-project basis.

For employers, that means not having to worry about what to do with employees during the inevitable business cycle downturns. On the flip side, knowledge workers have begun positioning themselves financially so they no longer have to depend on a steady income. They’re happy to work on a project, then take time off to travel and see the world or take a sabbatical.

So where is all of this headed, and what do you need to be doing in order not to be left behind?

This time it’s personal

As we’ve often said, technology is an enabler, and the productivity gains it provides are a key driver. But as we enter the next phase of this transformation, the underlying forces will become more social and cultural in nature.

It’s common knowledge that two-thirds of the workforce is either not engaged or actively disengaged. The prevailing mood is one of major disenchantment with corporate culture. This is showing up in both our social and political discourse. Let’s take a look at some of the factors behind this condition.

In his keynote address to the 2016 Global Talent Summit in Washington, D.C., Jim Clifton, Gallup chairman and CEO, pointed out a stark generational difference. “In the last century, the key values of those seeking employment were peace, freedom and family,” he said. A job that provided a steady source of income was the basis for sustaining those values.

“That’s not the case for the millennial generation,” Clifton noted. “They not only want a job, they want a job with purpose.” Additional insights come from the 2014 Towers Watson Global Talent Management and Rewards Study, which identified “managing and limiting work-related stress” as a key retention driver for employees.

Even the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is getting on board. Shortly after he was sworn in as Secretary, Ashton Carter launched the Force of the Future Program, aimed at attracting and retaining the best talent. Objectives include helping DoD employees find a sense of purpose, achieve personal growth and craft a meaningful engagement experience.

Looking out to the year 2050 and beyond, the Millennium Project is creating a vision for what it calls the “self-actualizing economy,” characterized by improved education and health, reduced crime and increased self-employment. Add to that the steady reduction in costs of many common, everyday products and services, and you can see how the trend toward less “stuff” and more freedom will continue into the foreseeable future.

What it all means

We find many organizations going all-in on the mobility craze while paying little attention to the social and cultural aspects and wondering why their investment isn’t paying off. Others have avoided mobility, mainly out of fear, yet wonder why they’re having trouble attracting and retaining the right talent.

The answer goes much deeper. For much of the workforce, especially in developed countries, the very notion of a job is changing, if not going away entirely. HR managers and execs need to worry less about policies and procedures and focus more on tapping into and expanding their talent networks, and enabling knowledge flows both within and outside their organization.

This does not need to be complicated. Start by looking strategically at what you want to accomplish. Then find people who are the best match in both directions: where you provide a path to growth and fulfillment through purposeful work and where the knowledge worker contributes to the ongoing success of your enterprise.

The freedom-loving, purposeful, self-actualized workforce is here to stay. Now is the time to act, whether you’re the one being hired or the one doing the hiring. Oh, yes, and no matter where you happen to be.

Source : kmworld.com

One of the biggest, scary enigmas in digital marketing is Google’s algorithm used to rank search engine results. It’s a Da Vinci’s Code of sorts that leaves many of us scratching our heads. But alas, Google has finally announced its top three factors used in the search rankings process. Among their newest additions is RankBrain, and we’re about to examine why.

The 3rd Most Important SEO Signal

Bloomberg.com broke the story that RankBrain now serves as one of Google’s primary signals (a factor that goes into Google’s algorithm to sort out its search rankings). According to the company, it is the 3rd most important SEO signal behind inbound linking and webpage content. The difference? It is a machine-learning, artificial intelligence system that systematically processes search queries for better rankings placement. In other words, it can decipher what users are trying to type into a search even if not initially apparent.

Decipher Difficult Search Queries

So if you’re typing in, “consumers at the top of the food chain,” RankBrain will understand that you’re looking for something related to the animal kingdom. You know, instead of a “consumer of goods.” This difference is important as it can greatly affect search engine placement by filtering out the confusion.

A Move To AI

While it still remains crucial to build backlinks for your site (as we mentioned before, linking remains one of the top two Google signals), it’s apparent that the company’s move to AI is going to alleviate the burden of many websites looking to rise above the pack. RankBrain aims to sort together previously unresolvable queries, potentially generating you more impressions. The technology also helps alleviate the strain placed upon Google employees in Mountain View, CA responsible for manually reviewing brand new queries. They used to have to deal with the 15 percent of queries each day that their systems had never seen before. By removing the human factor, efficiency should greatly improve.

Beating Out Top Google Engineers

Thus far, RankBrain is outsmarting the human beings it seeks to replace. In a side-by-side test with real life Google search engineers, the employees guessed which pages would rank at the top of each search 70 percent of the time. Sound impressive? Well, not compared to the 80 percent success rate of RankBrain.

Hummingbird Still Rules

After Google made the announcement that they had added this new element to their search algorithm, people were in a frenzy thinking Google had replaced ALL other signals with RankBrain. Just to be clear, RankBrain is merely a part of the larger Hummingbird algorithm. This overall algorithm contains hundreds of signals that are constantly being altered. As we stated above, RankBrain still sits behind the two signals that a) require publishers to build backlinks to their site, and b) forces publishers to create quality content that drives user engagement.

RankBrain Is A Sign Of The Future

Creating a smarter algorithm, and eradicating human error, is always a part of Google’s search engine strategy, and RankBrain is a massive step in that direction. But while it’s important to learn as much as you can about these new signals added to Google’s algorithm, it’s also critical to master the two basic (and essential) other elements – link building and content marketing and SEO strategy. Because if a website lacks engaging content and proper linking, its pages will fall so low in the search rankings that even RankBrain won’t be able to help.

Source : http://www.business2community.com/seo/role-rankbrain-googles-algorithm-01626392#wupTwpfjFpJjFpZi.97 

Friday, 20 May 2016 02:53

Learning to research on the Web

Cyberspace is not like your library

Librarians have a weird sense of humor. This is now an old joke: The internet is like a library with no catalog where all the books get up and move themselves every night...This was the state of the internet up until 1995 or thereabouts. Finding anything on the internet required comic strip characters like Archie, Veronica and Jughead, and generally you were the one who ended up feeling like a jughead when you rooted around for hours and still came up dry.

The new joke is:

The internet is like a library with a thousand catalogs, none of which contains all the books and all of which classify the books in different categories—and the books still move around every night. The problem now is not that of "finding anything" but finding a particular thing. When your search term in one of the popular search engines brings back 130,000 hits, you still wonder if the one thing you're looking for will be among them.

This can be an enormous problem when you're trying to do serious research on the internet. Too much information is almost worse than too little, because it takes so much time to sort through it to see if there's anything useful. The rest of this section will give you some pointers to help you become an effective internet researcher.

Get to know the reference sources on the internet

Finding reference material on the Web can be a lot more difficult than walking into the Reference Room in your local library.

The subject-classified Web directories described below will provide you with your main source of links to reference materials on the Web. In addition, many public and academic libraries, like the Internet Public Library, have put together lists of links to Web sites, categorized by subject. The difficulty is finding Web sites that contain the same kind of substantive content you'd find in a library. See the section on Reference Sources on the Web for a list of some Web-based reference materials, but please read Information found—and not found—on the Web to understand why it's different from using the library.

Understand how search engines work

Search engines are software tools that allow a user to ask for a list of Web pages containing certain words or phrases from an automated search index. The automated search index is a database containing some or all of the words appearing on the Web pages that have been indexed. The search engines send out a software program known as a spider, crawler or robot. The spider follows hyperlinks from page to page around the Web, gathering and bringing information back to the search engine to be indexed.

Most search engines index all the text found on a Web page, except for words too common to index, such as "a, and, in, to, the" and so on. When a user submits a query, the search engine looks for Web pages containing the words, combinations, or phrases asked for by the user. Engines may be programmed to look for an exact match or a close match (for example, the plural of the word submitted by the user). They may rank the hits as to how close the match is to the words submitted by the user.

One important thing to remember about search engines is this: once the engine and the spider have been programmed, the process is totally automated. No human being examines the information returned by the spider to see what subject it might be about or whether the words on the Web page adequately reflect the actual main point of the page.

Another important fact is that all the search engines are different. They each index differently and treat users' queries differently (how nice!). The burden is on the searcher to learn how to use the features of each search engine. See the links to Search Engines and to sources which have done Evaluations of the various features of Web directories and search engines.

See the Web and internet tutorials in the Links section for online articles about search engines.

Know the difference between a search engine and a directory

A search engine like Google or Hotbot lets you seek out specific words and phrases in Web pages. A directory is more like a subject index in the library—a human being has determined the main point of a Web page and has categorized it based on a classification scheme of topics and subtopics used by that directory. Some examples of directories are Yahoo! and the Internet Public Library. Many of the search engines have also developed browsable directories, and most of the directories also have a search engine, so the distinction between them is blurring.

See the links to Web directories and to sources which have done Evaluations of the various features of Web directories and search engines.

Consult the reference librarian for advice

Reference librarians can often be of great help in planning your internet research. Just as they know their library's collection, they probably have done a lot of research on the internet and know its resources pretty well. They're also skilled at constructing search terms and using search engines, and they're trained to teach others how to search.

Learn about search syntax and professional search techniques

To be successful at any kind of online searching, you need to know something about how computer searching works. At this time, much of the burden is on the user to intelligently construct a search strategy, taking into account the peculiarities of the particular database and search software. The section on Skills for online searching will help.

Learn some essential browser skills

Know how to use your browser for finding your way around, finding your way back to places you've been before and for "note-taking" as you gather information for your paper. A large part of effective research on the Web is figuring out how to stay on track and not waste time—the "browsing" and "surfing" metaphors are fine for leisure time spent on the Web, but not when you're under time pressure to finish your research paper. Lots of colleges have Netscape tutorials - see Web and internet tutorials for links which will supplement the information below.

URLs

Understand the construction of a URL.

Sometimes a hyperlink will take you to a URL such as http://www.sampleurl.com/files/howto.html. You should know that the page "howto.html" is part of a site called "www.sampleurl.com." If this page turns out to be a "not found" error, or doesn't have a link to the site's home page, you can try typing in the location box "http://www.sampleurl.com/" or "http://www.sampleurl.com/files/" to see if you can find a menu or table of contents. Sometimes a file has been moved or its name has changed, but the site itself still has content useful to you—this is a way to find out.

If there's a tilde (~) in the URL, you're probably looking at someone's personal page on a larger site. For example "http://www.bigsite.com/~jonesj/home.html" refers to a page at www.bigsite.com where J. Jones has some server space in which to post Web pages.

Navigation

Be sure you can use your browser's "Go" list, "History" list, "Back" button and "Location" box where the URL can be typed in. In Web research, you're constantly following links through to other pages then wanting to jump back a few steps to start off in a different direction. If you're using a computer at home rather than sharing one at school, check the settings in your "Cache" or "History list" to see how long the places you've visited will be retained in history. This will determine how long the links will show as having been visited before (i.e, purple in Netscape, green in our site). Usually, you want to set this period of time to cover the full time frame of your research project so you'll be able to tell which Web sites you've been to before.

Bookmarks or favorites

Before you start a research session, make a new folder in your bookmarks or favorites area and set that folder as the one to receive new bookmark additions. You might name it with the current date, so you later can identify in which research session the bookmarks were made. Remember you can make a bookmark for a page you haven't yet visited by holding the mouse over the link and getting the popup menu (by either pressing the mouse button or right clicking, depending on what flavor computer you have) to "Add bookmark" or "Add to favorites." Before you sign off your research session, go back and weed out any bookmarks which turned out to be uninteresting so you don't have a bunch of irrelevant material to deal with later. Later you can move these bookmarks around into different folders as you organize information for writing your paper—find out how to do that in your browser.

Printing from the browser

Sometimes you'll want to print information from a Web site. The main thing to remember is to make sure the Page Setup is set to print out the page title, URL, and the date. You'll be unable to use the material if you can't remember later where it came from.

"Saving as" a file

Know how to temporarily save the contents of a Web page as a file on your hard drive or a floppy disk and later open it in your browser by using the "file open" feature. You can save the page you're currently viewing or one which is hyperlinked from that page, from the "File" menu or the popup menu accessed by the mouse held over the hyperlink.

Copying and pasting to a word processor

You can take quotes from Web pages by opening up a word processing document and keeping it open while you use your browser. When you find text you want to save, drag the mouse over it and "copy" it, then open up your word processing document and "paste" it. Be sure to also copy and paste the URL and page title, and to record the date, so you know where the information came from.

Be prepared to cite your Web references

Find out what form of bibliographic references your instructor requires. Both the MLA and APA bibliographic formats have developed rules for citing sources on CD-ROM and the internet. Instructions for Citing Electronic Sources are linked from the Internet Public Library.

Source:  http://www.ipl.org/div/aplus/internet.htm

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