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All web browsers include a default search engine and a set of search engines that is supported by default. You search when you type anything in the address bar that is not an address and will always use the default search engine for that.

Browsers include options to change the default search engine so that another one is used whenever you type in the address bar, but what if you want to use different search engines based on your queries? You could open the homepages of non-default search engines and start searches from there, but there is an easier option, and it is included in all Chromium-based web browsers including Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Vivaldi, Opera, or Brave.

All of these browsers support the ancient keywords feature. Basically, what it does is associate a shortcut with a search engine URL to run searches using that shortcut.

Some browsers map single-letter shortcuts to search engines e.g. Vivaldi does that.  Using Vivaldi, you can use the sequence B-Key, then Tab-key, to run searches using Bing, or D-Key then Tab-key, to use DuckDuckGo.

Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Brave support keywords as well, but the companies have set the keywords to the domain name. That's a nuisance, as you need to type Bing.com then Tab-key to run a search from Bing, or ecosia.org then Tab-key to use that search engine.

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Users who would like to make use of the keywords feature in Chromium-based browsers may run into the following two primary issues:

  1. How to add search engines that are not integrated with the web browser by default.
  2. How to make sure that "sane" keywords are linked to search engines to speed up the process.

Adding search engines to Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers

chrome search engines

Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers pick up search engines automatically. The best option is to visit the search engine's homepage, e.g. Startpage, and run a single search. It should be added to the browser's selection of search engines automatically at that point.

 

Load chrome://settings/search engines (note that the address may be different depending on the browser) to verify that the search engine is available. You may use the search on the page to find a search engine quickly if lots are listed on the page.

To get to the page manually, select Menu > Settings > Manage Search Engines (or Search Engines).

Customizing keyword shortcuts for search engines

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The browser lists the keywords on the search engine management page. You change them with a click on the three dots that are displayed at the rightmost location of the search engine's line on the page and selecting "Edit" from the menu that opens.

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You may then change the keyword (and other parameters). The new keyword is displayed directly in the listing, and you may use it directly in the address bar without a restart.

Just type the new keyword followed by a tap on the Tab-key, a search term, and Enter-key to run a search using the associated search engine.

Now You: do you use keywords in your browser? (via Deskmodder)

 [Source: This article was published in ghacks.net By Martin Brinkmann - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila] 
Categorized in Search Engine

Search results can be cluttered with ads and other less-useful information. These add-ons strip out the junk to help you find exactly what you're looking for.

THE WEB IS a big place, which is why we need search engines. But given that virtually every popular search engine now heavily weights its top results in favor of its own products, services, and ads, it's gotten surprisingly difficult to really find the information you're looking for.

Luckily, these browser extensions for Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Mozilla Firefox take your searches to the next level, making them smarter and faster, so you don't have to spend so much time sifting through ads and irrelevant information to find good search results.

From digging deeper into Wikipedia to querying multiple search engines at once, you should be able to find something of use here. Note that the new Microsoft Edge browser is based on Chromium, like Google Chrome is, so you can install any extension from the Chrome Web Store.

Search the Current Site

Full marks to this particular browser add-on for one of the most straightforward and descriptive names we've come across: Search the Current Site does exactly that, running your query of choice on every page across the domain you're currently visiting (such as www.wired.com). While your browser lets you search through the single web page you're currently viewing if you tap Ctrl+F (Windows) or Cmd+F (macOS), this extension is a far more comprehensive and customizable way of getting results from one particular website.
Wikipedia Search

It's likely that a lot of your web searches are going to lead you to Wikipedia anyway, so you can speed up the process by querying the online encyclopedia right from the address bar in Chrome or Edge—just type "wiki" followed by your search keywords. The extension does more than that though, also enabling you to look up terms from inside Wikipedia and on the web at large through the right-click context menu. It works with hundreds of languages that Wikipedia supports and is a must if you spend a lot of time hunting through its pages.

Wolfram|Alpha

Google is fine, up to a point, but Wolfram|Alpha beats it in all kinds of areas—from mathematical equations and algebra to cultural history and entertainment. It does conversions and calculations, physics queries, and data about engineering, and can also dig into information on transportation, the economy, and health. There's plenty more to explore besides everything we've already mentioned, and with this extension set up, you can get at the vast array of features offered by Wolfram|Alpha with a single click.

 

Simple Search

The Simple Search extension offers a reminder of what web searches used to look like: If you run a search using Bing or Google with Simple Search enabled, you'll get a plain and uncluttered list of results, without any of the distractions of ads, info boxes, and sponsored links. The simplified search results appear on top of the standard results, so if you want to see the original page, it's only a click away—otherwise enjoy searching the web the old-fashioned way.

TinEye Reverse Image Search

TinEye is one of those essential resources that should be in the toolkit of every serious web searcher. It scours the internet for pictures, or rather one specific picture that you provide—it can help you spot scams and fakes, work out the origin of an image, direct you towards different sizes of a certain picture, and more. This official TinEye extension makes it easier for you to launch image searches, via a new entry that gets added to the right-click context menu in your browser. Sure, in Chrome you can search for images by right-clicking on them as well, but this gives you another—and sometimes more useful—option.

Search All

Sometimes just one search engine isn't enough—Search All enables you to query Google, Bing, Amazon, Wikipedia, eBay, Twitter, YouTube, and any other search engine or searchable portal you want to add. It's easy to switch between the search options you've configured, and the extension makes it straightforward to focus your searches on shopping sites, image databases, video and movie sites, recipe portals, or whatever else you're particularly interested in. The add-on comes with some useful customizations too.

Multiple Tabs Search

Multiple Tabs Search is a web search extension for power users: Essentially, it lets you run multiple searches at once, together with any necessary parameters you want to add (to limit results to a certain site, for example). It can really speed up your searching if you're got a lot of queries to get through, and you can even remove certain sites (such as YouTube or Facebook) from the list of matches if necessary. The add-on can also be used to open a list of URLs at the same time in successive tabs, making it an even more useful utility.

InvisibleHand

InvisibleHand is a search tool that runs automatically in the background for you, springing into life whenever it finds the product you're currently looking at for a cheaper price somewhere else on the web. It can also load up coupons relevant to the site that you're currently visiting, just in case you can get some money off, and there's also the option to set up price alerts on particular items that you're interested in getting—potentially saving you hours of manually searching the web and clicking around to find the best deals online.

Giphy

Never be stuck for a GIF again by adding the Giphy extension right to your browser toolbar. No matter what the occasion, you can save yourself a substantial amount of searching time by loading up this add-on and typing in some keywords—you can then copy the URL link to your chosen GIF, or drag and drop it straight into the web page you're on (your reactions will never have been so fast). The extension's pop-up window also showcases GIFs that are trending and proving popular, in case you're stuck for some inspiration.

[Source: This article was published in wired.com By DAVID NIELD - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin ]

Categorized in Search Engine

If you browse the web in Incognito mode, everything you do is private, right? In a word, no.

Your internet service provider, for example, can still see your activity. This misconception has even turned into a legal battle. A proposed class-action lawsuit accuses Google of tracking users while in Incognito mode, among other things.

If Incognito mode isn’t genuinely private, why use it? I have a few practical uses you’ll want to try.

What does Incognito mode do?

While Incognito mode — in any browser — does provide more privacy than if you’re not using it, it doesn’t live up to the expectations that many have. So, what exactly does it mean to use incognito mode?

When you surf the web incognito, your browser doesn’t save your browsing history, cookies, site data or information you enter in forms. It does, however, keep any downloaded files or bookmarks created during the session. Not to mention the fact that your IP address and computer data are still vulnerable to hackers.

Your internet service provider can still see your activity, as can a school or employer providing your internet access or computer.

When using Incognito mode is a good idea

Now, you don’t have true anonymity in Incognito mode, but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth using. Here are a few of my favorites.

1. Signing in to multiple email accounts

It’s a pain when you want to check your personal inbox, but you’re logged into another account. Instead of using separate browsers or signing in and out of your accounts, use Incognito mode.

Try signing into your work email using your browser usually, then open an Incognito window for your personal account.

2. Shopping for gifts

Whenever you shop online for a gift, whether it’s for a birthday, anniversary, or Christmas, you want it to be a surprise. Targeted ads can ruin those special moments.

When you shop online, your browser keeps tabs on everything that you look for. Later, you’ll see ads pop-up on other sites that try to get you to come back to make the purchase — even if you already bought the item.

Those ads won’t only be displayed for you. If the person you’re buying the gift for uses your computer, tablet, or smartphone, they will see the same ads. Of course, this is going to tip them off as to what you’re up to. That won’t happen if you shop in Incognito mode.

3. Avoid auto-fill suggestions in the future

Ever need to find instructions for a DIY project on a site like YouTube? The platform is great for learning how to do pretty much anything these days. Need to know how to replace the battery in your car? No worries, there are tons of YouTube videos that will give you step-by-step details on how to do it.

But the need to change your car battery only comes around once every few years. You don’t want to be inundated with suggestions on how to change your car’s battery every time you visit YouTube or any other site for that matter.

 

You can avoid these annoying suggestions by searching in Incognito mode. When your battery dies three years from now, you can do another search for instructions without being bombarded with suggestions.

4. Booking travel

Some travel companies keep track of what you’ve searched for recently and will increase prices the next time you visit the site. If you use Incognito mode, you don’t have to worry about price gouging.

It’s not just the travel industry that does this, either. Many online shopping sites know when you’re stalking an item and could raise the price if you leave and come back later to buy it. Don’t leave it up to chance.

5. Getting out of your bubble

You’ve most likely spent much more time binge-watching TV shows or listening to music in the past few months than normal.

YouTube gives you suggestions on what to watch next based on your viewing history. If you want to step outside of your comfort zone, try searching for new videos in Incognito mode. That way, you’ll get a new perspective on entertainment that isn’t based on your past. You can do the same with your Google searches.

6. View a site as an outsider

Do you have your own website and want to see what it looks like to new visitors? You can check it out in Incognito mode for a fresh perspective.

There are many reasons to use Incognito mode, even though it might not be as private as you’d hope for. Take advantage of these ideas and you’ll never have to worry about ruining the surprise of a special anniversary gift again.

Staying safe online can quickly become complicated. From choosing strong passwords to being careful with what attachments you open to installing the right antivirus software, it’s easy to sink time and money into staying safe.

 [Source: This article was published in foxwilmington.com By KIM KOMANDO - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Live captions are an important part of the tech industry, and a big part of the reason why that is the case has to do with the fact that a lot of the people that are trying to use tech solutions are living with disabilities with hearing impairments being among the most common disabilities that people end up facing on a regular basis. Hence, a lot of tech companies have been working on live captions but the fact of the matter is that we haven’t seen anything quite like what Chrome has just done.

You see, the latest version of Chrome is going to feature support for live captions, marking the first time that a web browser has ever had anything of this nature all in all. Enabling the feature would make it so that you would start seeing a dedicated captions box, and any media that you play would start showing captions inside that box. This is useful because of the fact that not all companies emphasize live captions and making their technology accessible quite as much as they should be doing, and this is causing a lot of problems along the way.



If you want to toggle captions on then you need to start by having the latest version of Chrome Canary. Once you have the latest version, the next thing that you are going to have to do is type chrome://flags into the address bar, and when you see the option to search for flags put in “live captions”. A drop down menu will come up and if you select “enabled” all you would have to do is restart your browser and then you can start using the live captions. Once you have restarted the browser, go into accessibility section in your settings to switch them on or off and play any media to see if they are working properly.

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[Source: This article was published in digitalinformationworld.com By Zia Muhammad - Uploaded by the Association Member: Corey Parker]

Categorized in Search Engine

GOOGLE is the most popular search engine on the internet, with Microsoft's Bing a distant second. But which is better, and which is safer to use?

People can actually choose from more than 20 different search engines. Most, however, stick with the most popular search engines, particularly  (92 percent) and Bing (2.5 percent). Both Google and  Bing take online safety extremely seriously, making it very it very difficult to choose between them.

Google's sheer pervasiveness into the fabric of our everyday lives makes it very difficult to argue any other search is a credible challenger to its crown.

Google can help users narrow down what exactly they are looking for with specialised searches.

Users can browse through different categories pertaining to keywords, including: Images, Maps, News articles, Products or services you can purchase online, Videos and scholarly papers.

Like all search engines, Google uses a special algorithm to determine its search results.

And while Google shares some facts about its algorithm, the specifics are a company secret.

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Google vs Bing: The overwhelming majority of people stick with the most popular search engines - Google and Bing (Image: Getty)

This helps Google remain competitive with other search engines and reduces the chance of hackers discovering how to abuse the system.

Google uses automated programs called spiders or crawlers to help generate its search results.

What differentiates Google is how it ranks its results, which determines the order Google displays results on its search engine results pages.

The world-leading search engine uses the PageRank algorithm to assign each Web page a relevancy score.

A web page's PageRank depends on three main factors:

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Google vs Bing: Google can help users narrow down what exactly they are looking for with specialised searches (Image: Getty)

The most important factor is the number of other Web pages linking to the page in question.

Also, if the keyword appears only once within the body of a page, it will receive a low score for that keyword.

 

And the length of time a web page has existed ensures Google places more value on those with an established history.

Although Microsoft's Bing is also a search engine, it differs slightly to Google in the way it works.

But the way Bing works is relatively simple in comparison to Google.

Bing will scan all documents for the frequency of root words, meaning "running" will be shortened to "run" and will cut out the irrelevant words.

These frequencies are then given a hash value or an ID number.

So, when a term is typed into the search bar, the roots of the words are found, a hash value is calculated and found in a frequency table.

The outcomes that contain this result are called essential pages and only the highest-scoring pages will be chosen.

These pages then go through a second process called Click Distance.

Bing combines a page’s relevancy in addition to Click Distance – the number of mouse clicks it takes to find the content.

This is then analysed using URL depth property, with lengthier URLs considered less important due to their distance from the homepage.

So if a URL has numerous backslashes, Bing will not rank it, even if it is linked to from the homepage.

And although relevancy and click distance are important factors, Bing also factors a user’s search history when displaying search results.

Is Google or Bing safer?

Google Safe Browsing helps protect over four billion devices every day by showing warnings to users when they attempt to navigate to dangerous sites or download dangerous files.

Safe Browsing also notifies webmasters when their websites are compromised by malicious actors and helps them diagnose and resolve the problem so that their visitors stay safer.

Safe Browsing protections work across Google products and power safer browsing experiences across the Internet.

Google Chrome and other browsers use Safe Browsing to show users a warning message before they visit a dangerous site or download a harmful app.

Bing's SafeSearch helps keep adult content out of your search results.

There are three different ways you can turn on SafeSearch.

For individual accounts, choose SafeSearch options on the Settings page.

At a network level, map www.bing.com to strict.bing.com.

For an individual PC, map www.bing.com to strict.bing.com.

[Source: This article was published in express.co.uk By TOM FISH - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore] 

Categorized in Search Engine

There's an old joke among Windows users: "Internet Explorer is the best browser to download a better browser with."

In other words, Internet Explorer — Microsoft's old flagship internet browser — has been around for years, and few people actually like it. That's a big reason why in 2015 Microsoft released Edge, their new and improved browser.

Microsoft has made a big effort with Edge to improve the browsing experience, and it's paid off. Microsoft Edge has enough features and benefits that it's actually a real alternative to more popular browsers like Chrome or Firefox.

 

This is especially true with the Edge's most recent update, which overhauled how the browser runs and operates.

Here's everything you need to know about Microsoft Edge, including what it offers, and how to download it on your PCMaciPhone, or Android device.

Microsoft Edge, explained

The newest version of Edge is what's called a "Chromium" browser. This means that it can run hundreds of extensions that were originally meant for Google Chrome users. This includes screen readers, in-browser games, productivity tools, and more. 

This is in addition to the extensions already in the Microsoft Store, which you can also use. If you can think of a feature you'd like the browser to have, there's probably an extension for it.

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You can find the Extensions menu by clicking the three dots at the top-right and clicking "Extensions." 

 

 

 

If you sign up for a free Microsoft account, you can sync your bookmarks, history, passwords, and more. This means that if you use Edge on a different computer, you'll have all of your browsing data available in moments.

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Like with Google Chrome, you can sync your browsing information to your email account. 

 

 

 

Reviews have also said that this new version of Edge runs faster than previous versions, putting it about on par with Chrome and Firefox.

If you'd like to give Microsoft Edge a try, you can download it from the Edge website, here.

The page should automatically detect whether you're using a Mac, PC, iPhone, or Android device. If you think the page has gotten it wrong, click the arrow next to the "Download" button to see all the available versions.

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[Source: This article was published in businessinsider.com By Ross James - Uploaded by the Association Member: Alex Gray]

Categorized in Search Engine

Unlock censoreship- and AWS-resistant websites.

Unstoppable Domains today launches its native, censorship-resistant crypto browser. Users can now surf the decentralized web and send crypto payments directly to site addresses ending in .zil or .crypto.

Blockchain Domains Built on Ethereum

Like domain names used for surfing the traditional internet, Unstoppable Domains offers enthusiasts an opportunity to host a site on the Ethereum and Zilliqua blockchains. 

Accessing these sites is also straightforward for those unfamiliar with blockchain-based technologies. Users simply add .crypto or .zil, like .com, to a corresponding Unstoppable Domain to navigate to different portions of the decentralized Internet. 

What initially began as a mechanism for easily remembering cryptocurrency addresses, has now turned into a suite of products from the San Francisco-based team. Sending cryptocurrencies from wallet to wallet required users to either memorize a 40-character string of letters, numbers and symbols or copy and paste this string of information. 

The former is cumbersome, while the latter has proven risky. 

In 2018, Bleeping Computer reported a type of malware that would monitor users machines for cryptocurrency addresses. If detected, whenever the user would attempt to copy and paste the address, the malware would swap the address with the attacker’s. This way funds would be sent directly to the attacker rather than the intended recipient. 

Thanks to upstarts like Unstoppable Domains and ENS Domains, both issues can be mitigated. The second step after uncensorable payments, has then been to build out uncensorable domains. 

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nsofar as many of the world’s most popular sites are built on centralized services like Amazon Web Services (AWS), taking down a website is not difficult. In the unlikely case that AWS ever shutdown, much of the Internet as we know it would also disappear. Conversely, websites built on a blockchain are protected from seizures and from being stripped of content. 

Many websites that use either a .crypto or a .zil are already available. When users download the Unstoppable Browser, they can use the Chromium-based browser to visit sites like cryptolark.crypto or timdraper.crypto.

Interested parties can download the browser for either Windows or MacOS today. 

 

Cosmos Dev Leaves Tendermint, Cites “Untenable” CEO as Reason

Zaki Manian walks after internal conflict.

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Tendermint Labs director Zaki Manian has resigned from his post. Tendermint is a core contributor to the Cosmos blockchain network.

Zaki Manian’s Recent Hint at a Departure

In early February, Manian tweeted his discontent with Tendermint CEO Jae Kwon, saying the co-founder “has obsessively focused on Virgo while neglecting and under resourcing IBC… threw a painstakingly planned hiring and resource improvement proposal out the window to become @BitcoinJaesus.”

He labeled the CEO’s conduct “an untenable distraction.”

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Manian intends to continue working on Cosmos, telling Decrypt:

“There are people inside the company that want to portray this as a power struggle between me and Jae, and this as an outcome and me threatening x, y and z. But it was really me saying I don’t see a way in this arrangement to get the work done. And the best way to get the work done was for me to leave.”

Tendermint Continues Development Work

Tendermint is yet to comment on the high profile departure. The company’s vision “to create open networks in order to manage conflict and empower people to align on universal goals to enact positive societal and environmental change” appears to have come unstuck at its own workplace. 

However, it does have a slate of over 100 projects in the Cosmos and Tendermint ecosystems. The Tendermint protocol is an interoperability network, on top of which Cosmos was built.

How Cosmos’ lead developer’s departure will impact the relationship between the two networks remains unclear.

China Sees Red: FCoin Transaction Fee Costs the Exchange Millions

Unique business model costs exchange its business.

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Chinese exchange FCoin today announced insolvency following internal “technical difficulties.” The platform’s founder has already announced a new project to help pay back the multi-million dollar capital reserve.

“The Route to Hell Is Paved with Goodwill”

So reads the first line of an ominous Reddit post from FCoin’s founder on Feb. 17.

The announcement from Jian Zhang, formerly the CTO of Huobi, indicated that it would not be able to process user withdrawals because the exchange had become insolvent. “It is expected that the scale of non-payment is between [7,000 -13,000] BTC,” said the executive.

The culprit behind such malpractice was the very mechanism that helped FCoin briefly become a top exchange in 2018. 

The exchange leveraged a unique “transaction-fee mining” reward to bootstrap adoption. In practice, this meant that for every trade fee paid on FCoin, the users would be reimbursed entirely in the exchange’s native token, FToken (FT). 

Users quickly flocked to the exchange, thus pumping the price of FT and inflating the exchange’s volumes on CoinMarketCap. At one point, the exchange overtook the likes of OKEx and Binance at its peak. 

Zhang indicated that the team raked in between $150 and $200 million at this time, with payouts to “old FCoin users” as high as 6,000 Bitcoin. Soon, however, this very mechanism became the exchange’s downfall. 

In its short existence, FCoin had been periodically paying out users slightly more than they could afford. The team did not notice this discrepancy due to poor analytical tools for measuring payouts. Even after they began buying back FT with company funds, a user base eager to leverage the underdeveloped business model had far outpaced the team’s ability to save a sinking ship. 

Still, in an act of good faith, Zhang is determined to payout all remaining withdrawal requests.

Over the next two to three months, the founder will fulfill all email withdrawal requests as part one of a two-part plan. The second part, relies on the success of a “new project,” said Zhang. He added: 

“Once the new project is on track, I will begin the long-term mail withdrawal process, which may take 1-3 years. In addition, for the other losses of FT and FMEX investors, I am also willing to use the profit of the new project to compensate. The specific calculation method will be discussed with you at the beginning of the compensation.”

At the time of writing, FT finished trading at ~$0.04, down from a high of nearly $0.30 in May 2019. FCoin reports a 24-hour volume in BTC/USDT of  approximately $115 million, according to CoinMarketCap. FT is the seventh highest-traded coin on the platform. 

Binance Cloud to Offer Exchange-in-a-Box Infrastructure Service

Binance set to enter the white-label market

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Binance is set to develop white-label crypto exchange infrastructure for use by smaller exchanges, allowing them to focus on regulatory compliance.

Binance Cloud Service Extends to Exchange Infrastructure

Binance’s cloud service was already hinted at by the exchange’s CEO, Changpeng “CZ” Zhao, during an “ask me anything” session on Feb. 8. Their white-label exchange infrastructure will provide spot market and futures trading, bank API integrations, and fiat-to-cryptocurrency exchange services. 

Exchanges will be able to rebrand the software infrastructure, to be hosted on Binance Cloud, to suit the needs of their local markets. A statement from the company explained:

“The Binance Cloud service is an all-in-one solution, featuring an easy-to-use dashboard that allows customers to manage funds, trading pairs and coin listings, as well as multilingual support, depth-sharing with the Binance.com global exchange, and more opportunities to collaborate with the ecosystem.”

White-Label Exchanges Nothing New

White-label crypto exchange infrastructure is not new to the industry. The current market leader is AlphaPoint, which claims to provide infrastructure to “over 100 exchange operators.”

Binance’s entry into the white-label market appears to be in line with the giant’s determination to redefine money and expand cryptocurrency access and services to a worldwide audience.

 

With Binance-powered matching engines, security, and liquidity solutions, new exchanges would be able to access instant workability and scalability. Startup exchanges have historically faced daunting setup costs, with many failing to gain significant market traction.

The 32nd largest exchange by 24-hour volume, according to CoinMarketCap, had less than half a million dollars in trading activity for the day at press time.

Read More...

[Source: This article was published in cryptobriefing.com By Liam Kelly - Uploaded by the Association Member: Bridget Miller]

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was Published in pcmag.com By Max Eddy - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]

Once Incognito Mode is engaged in Maps, 'you can search and navigate without linking this activity with your Google account,' says CEO Sundar Pichai

Google first introduced Incognito Mode years ago with the release of the Chrome browser. Now, as part of a larger push to enhance consumer privacy, the search giant is adding Incognito Mode to both Google Search and Google Maps.

When Incognito Mode is engaged in Chrome, your activities aren't stored in your browser history. It also disables cookies, which are used to identify and sometimes track individuals around the web, and turns off browser extensions. It doesn't hide your online activity, as a VPN would.

Google Maps

Google first introduced Incognito Mode years ago with the release of the Chrome browser. Now, as part of a larger push to enhance consumer privacy, the search giant is adding Incognito Mode to both Google Search and Google Maps.

When Incognito Mode is engaged in Chrome, your activities aren't stored in your browser history. It also disables cookies, which are used to identify and sometimes track individuals around the web, and turns off browser extensions. It doesn't hide your online activity, as a VPN would.

 

Incognito mode for Google Maps will be similar, Google CEO Sundar Pichai explained in a blog post. Once Incognito Mode is engaged in Maps, "you can search and navigate without linking this activity with your Google account," he wrote.

Google Maps Incognito Mode

You may have noticed that when you search in Google, meanwhile, your old searches sometimes pop up again. Google uses your activity to tailor the results for you, but not so with Incognito Mode for Search.

Incognito for Google Maps and Search are coming later this year. Google has already rolled out an Incognito Mode for YouTube. "We strongly believe that privacy and security is for everyone, not just a few," said Pichai.

While this is an important move for Google, it's not yet clear what information will be saved when these new Incognito modes are engaged, and what the limitations will be. We have to assume that, like Incognito for Chrome, you won't be totally invisible.

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was Published in venturebeat.com By EMIL PROTALINSKI - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]

Google today released the Suspicious Site Reporter Extension. As its name implies, the extension lets users report suspicious sites to Google’s Safe Browsing service. Google also highlighted that Chrome recently started warning users about sites with deceptive URLs.

Google’s Safe Browsing service provides lists of URLs that contain malware or phishing content to Chrome, Firefox, and Safari browsers, as well as to internet service providers (ISPs). Google said in September 2017 that Safe Browsing protects over 3 billion devices and that the number last month increased to over 4 billion devices. The service shows warnings before users visit dangerous sites or download dangerous files.

Now Google is opening Safe Browsing for submissions. In fact, the Suspicious Site Reporter extension is a two-way street. The extension’s icon shows when you’re on a potentially suspicious site. Clicking the icon will show more information about why it might be suspicious. You can also report it for further evaluation. If the site is added to Safe Browsing’s suspicious lists, those aforementioned 4 billion devices will be protected from it.

 

In addition, Google released Chrome 75 earlier this month. The latest version comes with a new warning to direct users away from sites that have confusing URLs. The feature compares the URL of the page you’re currently on to URLs of pages you’ve recently visited. If the URL looks similar but isn’t identical (say, go0gle.com vs. google.com), Chrome will show a warning that helps you get back to the right domain.

“We believe that you shouldn’t have to be a security expert to feel safe on the web and that many Chrome power-users share our mission to make the web more secure for everyone,” said Chrome product manager Emily Schechter. Given today’s news, that’s fair. But if you look at the competition, Chrome could be doing more.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

[This article is originally published in fastcompany.com written by JR RAPHAEL - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Grace Irwin]

Give your internet experience a jolt of fresh energy with these easily overlooked features, options, and shortcuts for Google’s browser.

These days, a browser is more than just a basic navigator for the web. It’s effectively a second desktop—a gateway to countless apps, sites, and services. And optimizing that environment can go a long way in increasing your efficiency.

Google’s Chrome, in particular, is full of hidden shortcuts, features, and power-user possibilities. Take the time to learn these tips, and watch your productivity soar.

(Note that most of the tips here are specific to the desktop versions of Chrome for Windows PCs and Macs and may not apply to the browser’s mobile variants.)

LEARN SOME HANDY HIDDEN SHORTCUTS

1. Want to open a link into a new tab in the background, so it won’t interrupt what you’re doing? Hold down Ctrl- or Cmd- and click it. To open a link in a whole new window, meanwhile, use Shift instead. (This’ll work within most areas of Chrome, by the way—including the History page and the dropdown history list within the Back button, which we’ll get to in a bit.)

2. You probably know you can press the space bar to scroll down a full page-length, but there’s another side to that shortcut: If you press Shift and the space bar together, Chrome will do the opposite and scroll up by a full page-length at a time.

3. If you ever close a tab by mistake, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-Shift-T. Chrome will reopen your most recently closed tab as if nothing had ever happened. (And you can do it multiple times, too, if there’s more than one tab you’d like to recover.)

4. When you have a bunch of tabs open and want to hang onto the entire session for later, hit Ctrl-Shift-D. That’ll let you save all your open tabs into a folder for easy future access. To restore them, right-click the folder within your bookmarks and select “Open all” or “Open all in a new window.”

save all your open tabs into a folder for easy future access

5. Skip a step and get info about any word or phrase in a page by highlighting it and then right-clicking and selecting the “Search Google” option. You can also highlight a word or phrase and drag it into Chrome’s address bar to achieve the same result—or drag it into the area directly to the right of your final tab to launch the search in a new tab instead of your current one. (Bonus tip: Those same dragging behaviors can also be used to open links.)

6. Save a link with a single click: Just click, hold down your mouse button, and drag the link up into Chrome’s bookmarks bar. Drop it wherever you want, and it’ll be there the next time you need it.

7. If you download a file and then want to move it somewhere specific, click on its tile in the download bar that appears at the bottom of the browser. You can then drag and drop whatever you downloaded directly onto your desktop or into any folder.

8. You can also drag and drop files from Chrome’s download bar directly into an online service—like Google Drive, for instant uploading, or Gmail, for inserting the file as an attachment in a new message.

9. Should you ever find Chrome mysteriously misbehaving, remember this command: chrome://restart. Type it into Chrome’s address bar, and your browser will restart itself and restore all your tabs and windowsin a jiffy. You never know when it might come in handy.

TEACH YOUR BROWSER SOME NEW TRICKS

10. With 60 seconds of setup, you can give Chrome its own quick-access scratchpad that’ll let you jot down thoughts right within the browser—no extensions required. All you have to do is paste a snippet of code into Chrome’s address bar. Click here or on the image below to view and copy the necessary code.

jot down thoughts right within the browser

…and then save the page to your bookmarks bar for easy access. The scratchpad supports text formatting (Ctrl- or Cmd-B for bold, Ctrl- or Cmd-I for italics, and Ctrl- or Cmd-U for underlining) and even has a built-in spell check feature. Just open it and start typing—and if you want to save your thoughts for later retrieval, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-S.

The scratchpad supports text formatting

11. Chrome’s custom search engine feature has tons of untapped productivity potential. First, you can use it to create simple shortcuts to pages you visit often—anything from favorite websites to internal Chrome pages or even the scratchpad described in the previous tip. Just open up Chrome’s settings, click the line labeled “Manage search engines,” then click the “Add” command next to the “Other search engines” heading. Type the name of the page in the “Search engine” field, the shortcut you want for it in the “Keyword” field, and the page’s full URL in the “URL” field.

For instance, if you want to be able to pull up Chrome’s settings simply by typing “cs” into your address bar, you could use “Chrome Settings” as the search engine name, “cs” as the keyword, and chrome://settings as the URL. To get to your new scratchpad quickly, you could use “Scratchpad” as the search engine name, “s” as the keyword, and the full string of code from above as the URL.

12. You can also use Chrome’s custom search engines feature to create shortcuts for searching any sites you want. The trick is to first find the full URL of the site’s own search system—so if you wanted to do it for Fast Company, you’d go to fastcompany.com, click the search icon in the upper-right corner of the screen, then search for a word like “test.” The site will take you 

With that knowledge in tow, head back to Chrome’s “Manage search engines” section and click the “Add” command. This time, type “Fast Company” in as the search engine name, “fastcompany.com” as the keyword, and ”—with “%s” taking the place of the actual query—as the URL.

create shortcuts for searching any sites you want

The next time you start typing “fastcompany.com” into Chrome’s address bar, you’ll see instructions telling you to press Tab to search the site. Set up similar systems for shopping sites, Wikipedia, dictionaries and thesauruses, travel sites, or anything else you search semi-regularly, and you’ll save valuable time by skipping steps and jumping straight to the info you need.

13. Want to be able to search your email directly from Chrome’s address bar? Create a new custom search engine with the name Gmail, whatever keyword you want (either “gmail.com” or some shortened command), and “https://mail.google.com/mail/ca/u/0/#search/%s” as the URL.

14. Search Google Drive from the address bar by creating a custom search engine with “https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/search?q=%s” as the URL.

15. Speaking of Google Drive, if you move between multiple devices during the day (and at this point, who doesn’t?), make your life a little easier by telling Chrome to save anything you download to a cloud-based folder. That way, you’ll be able to find important files from your desktop, laptop, smartphone, or any other device—regardless of where the download was actually performed.

First, you’ll have to install the desktop syncing program for your cloud storage service of choice. Most services, including Google DriveDropbox, and OneDrive, offer such utilities for all the common operating systems. Once you set up the program, you’ll have a folder on your local hard drive that’s always synced to a folder in your cloud storage.

Now, head into Chrome’s settings, click “Advanced,” and scroll down to the section labeled “Downloads.” Click the “Change” command and find or create an appropriate subfolder within your cloud-synced folder. Once you’ve followed those steps on any desktop computers you want connected, anything you download will be available everywhere you work—and always accessible via the cloud service’s mobile apps as well.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HIDDEN POWER TOOLS

16. Quiet annoying sites once and for all by right-clicking their tabs (where the title is displayed) and selecting “Mute site.” This recently added option will prevent the site from playing any audio on your computer anytime you visit it.

17. Prefer to avoid leaving a trail as you navigate the web? Open Chrome’s settings, click “Advanced,” and then turn on the toggle next to “Send a ‘Do Not Track’ request with your browsing traffic,” located within the “Privacy and security” section.

18. For additional privacy, take advantage of Chrome’s out-of-the-way option to create multiple user profiles and allow guest access to your browser. That’ll let someone else use Chrome on your computer without gaining access to all of your personal data (and without gunking up your history with whatever sites they visit). Look for the line labeled “Manage other people” in Chrome’s settings to get started.

19. Chrome’s History page—accessible by hitting Ctrl- or Cmd-H or by typing chrome://history into your address bar—has a powerful yet easily overlooked feature: an always-synced list of tabs you have open in Chrome on other devices. Surf over there anytime you want to find what you were last viewing on your phone, your tablet, or another computer.

20. The Back button in Chrome’s upper-left corner does more than you might think. Click it and hold your mouse’s button down, and you’ll get a pop-up history of recent pages viewed within your current tab

a pop up history of recent pages viewed within your current tab

21. Chrome can strip all formatting from copied text as you paste it—eliminating links, fonts, colors, and anything else you might not want to carry over. Once you’ve copied some text, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-Shift-V to give it a whirl.

22. Trying to look at a website that’s down—or need to step back in time and see how a particular page looked a while ago? Type cache:website.com into Chrome’s address bar, replacing website.com with whatever URL you want.

23. Let Chrome act as your file explorer: Drag and drop any image, video, or audio file into the browser to open it right then and there—and on Windows, try typing C:\ into Chrome’s address bar to browse your hard drive’s contents.

ENHANCE YOUR ENVIRONMENT AND ELIMINATE ANNOYANCES

24. Sick of getting those pop-ups asking if some site can send notifications through your browser? Turn off site notifications entirely by opening Chrome’s settings, clicking “Advanced,” then clicking the line labeled “Content settings.” Next, find and click the line for “Notifications” and turn the toggle at the top of the page off.

25. The next time you come across a text form on a website, give yourself a little space to think: Look for the two diagonal lines in the box’s lower-right corner. Click that area and drag downward, and ta-da: You can resize the text box to make it as large as you’d like.

resize the text box to make it as large as youd likeJPG

26. Chrome extensions can be incredibly useful, but they can also create a lot of clutter in your browser’s upper-right corner. Hide the extension icons you don’t need to see by right-clicking them and selecting “Hide in Chrome menu” from the options that appear. You can also just hover your mouse over the far right side of the address bar until you see a double-sided arrow appear and then drag the address bar toward the right to extend it and hide multiple extension icons at once.

And if you ever need to get to an out-of-sight extension icon, just open the main Chrome menu (the three-dot icon to the right of the extensions). You’ll see all of the icons there.

27. While we’re talking about extensions, did you know you can create custom keyboard shortcuts for opening extensions on demand?Some extensions even allow you to create shortcuts for specific commands. Type chrome://extensions/shortcuts into your browser’s address bar to set up your own.

Categorized in Search Engine
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