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It’s been a long time since tablets were the up-and-coming hotness. Companies learned years ago that people just weren’t going to buy a new tablet every year—and that’s led some to abandon the form factor altogether. In fact, some of our favorite tablets from 2015 such as the Dell Venue 8 7000, the Samsung Tab S2, and the iPad mini 4 didn’t get updates this year at all.

Even with the fervor around tablets dying down, we got some fantastic tablets, especially in the 2-in-1 category. So here they are: the 10 best tablets of 2016.

10. LG G Pad X 8.0

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You may not have heard of the LG G Pad X 8.0 (which yes, is an unfortunate name), but it’s a new midrange tablet from LG available exclusively for T-Mobile. It works best as an e-reader, with the balance of a large screen and portable size you’ll find in an Android tablet. However, the Reading Mode makes late-night reading easy on the eyes, and the versatility of Android 6.0 Marshmallow lets you read e-books from almost any digital bookshelf out there including comics. It’s probably not going to blow you away, but at $240 with LTE connectivity, it’s a great value for what you’re getting.

9. Huawei Matebook

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Every device manufacturer has a 2-in-1 these days, and Huawei’s Matebook is the company’s first attempt at one. While the Matebook looks great in all respects—from the beautiful thin design to the brown leather case. As a tablet itself, it’s everything you’d expect from a device with a $699 pricetag. It doesn’t hold up quite as well in terms of the 2-in-1 aspect thanks to the wobbly case, but if all you’re looking for is a terrific Android tablet, the Matebook is a good (but expensive) option.

8. Asus ZenPad Z8

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On the far other end of the price spectrum is the ZenPad Z8 from Asus, exclusively for Verizon. It retails at just $149, making it the most affordable tablet on the list. It’s not going to impress you with its build quality or performance, but the ZenPad stands out in a market flooded with mostly junky midrange tablets. Without updates to budget-friendly tablets like the Nexus 7, Dell Venue 8 7000, or the NVIDIA Shield Tablet K1, the ZenPad Z8 takes the mantle on for cheap tablet that you won’t want to get rid of in six months.

7. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet

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When you think tablet, you’re not usually looking in the $1000+ territory, but that’s exactly what the ThinkPad X1 Tablet is. In other words, it’s obvious that Lenovo didn’t make this device for the average person—it’s for business professionals who are dedicated to the ThinkPad brand. The truth is for that market niche, the 2-in-1 X1 Tablet is fantastic as a machine for getting work done. Like most 12-inch tablets, the X1 Tablet is a little big too really use as a tablet, but with its great hi-res screen, built-in projector, and Lenovo’s proprietary pen, it’s potential uses are countless. The X1 Tablet may not have many takers, but those who can afford it won’t be disappointed.

6. Huawei MediaPad M3

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We didn’t get an update to the universally-loved iPad mini 4 this year, but this competitor from Huawei does a great job of filling that hole. The MediaPad M3 is impressive at being what it claims to be: a tablet for consuming media. This 8.4-inch tablet has a beautiful hi-res display, perfect for lounging on the couch with your favorite Netflixshow or game. A premium 8-inch Android tablet that isn’t trying to also sell you a keyboard is surprisingly hard to find these days. The MediaPad has Huawei’s slightly tacky Android skin over it, but installing a Google launcher can solve a lot of that.

5. Lenovo Yoga Tab 3 Pro

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Although we’ll soon be getting the Tab 3 Plus, the Yoga Tab 3 Pro is an excellent little tablet, provided you like what Lenovo is doing with its tablet design language. In some ways, it’s just another 8-inch Android tablet—in others it’s unlike any one you’ve ever seen. Just pull out the kickstand and you’ve got the ability to project an image up on your blank wall straight from the back of the device. While it doesn’t project in 1080p or anywhere near 1000 lumens, the result is still impressive and unique in a remarkably small package.

4. Amazon Kindle (2016)

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While having everything on what device is great, there are some things that the Kindle can do that a traditional tablet will never be able to do. The battery life, readability, and easy connection to Amazon’s Kindle service makes it a product that stands out for those who read a lot, especially if they’re travelers. The newest Kindle doesn’t make any drastic changes to the formula, but it’s lighter and thinner than previous models, making it that much easier to throw in your bag.

3. Lenovo IdeaPad Miix 510

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We didn’t get a new Surface or Surface Pro this year, leaving the window open for a company like Lenovo to offer its alternative. Late this year we got the IdeaPad Miix 510, a 2-in-1 Surface competitor that actually works wells as both a laptop and a tablet. With a Core i series processor, Windows 10, and a unique watchband-style kickstand, the Miix 510 is made for getting actual work done. At a starting price of only $599 (with an extra $130 for the detachable keyboard), the IdeaPad Miix 510 is the best 2-in-1 Windows 10 tablet to come out in 2016.

2. Pixel-C

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Although technically the Pixel-C was released in late December, it really wasn’t available until 2016—hence it’s position on this list. The Pixel-C is Google’s first tablet, built ground-up by Google. Replacing the Nexus tablets, the Pixel-C is possibly the best designed and constructed Android tablet ever made. It’s got an all-aluminum finish, a really innovative magnetic keyboard attachment, and a beautiful hi-res display.

What’s more, Android has finally gotten better at multitasking, making the Pixel-C more useful than ever before. Hopefully we’ll see Google update the Pixel-C again soon with more performance and battery life, but for now it’s the best Android tablet you can buy.

1. 9.7-inch iPad Pro

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In just about every way that matters, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is the long-awaited up to the iPad Air 2. It’s the traditional iPad size, but with all of the multitasking and power that came with with the massive 12.9-inch iPad Pro. That means it works with the Apple Pencil, new keyboard cover, and got a performance—all to make for a product you might just be able to get some work done on.

More than anything of that, though, the iPad continues to be the go-to tablet in a more general sense. Apple has pushed to make the iPad the premiere location for exclusive fullscreen apps that are built with the iPad in mind. The hardware and design are simply the best—and with the new splitscreen mode, it looks like the software is finally catching up too. In many ways, the iPad Pro is Apple following Microsoft’s lead with what it has achieved with the Surface Pro, but when you’re building on the foundation that is the iPad, it only sweetens the deal.

Author:  Luke Larsen

Source:  https://www.pastemagazine.com

Categorized in Internet Technology
Just Eat has delivered its first take away with a delivery robot to a customer in Greenwich, launching a pilot project that will involve transporting food in the city using autonomous vehicles. 
 
Following extensive testing, Europe's biggest online delivery food company Just Eat has become the first in the world to successfully transport a takeaway with a robot. 
 
The maiden delivery comes months after the company said it would be testing the robots in the area. Just Eat announced the partnership with Starship Technologies, makers of slow moving pavement droids, back in July and said it would start robotic deliveries later that month. 
Starship's robots are autonomous and unlock with a code sent to the customers' phone
 
 
Starship's robots are autonomous and unlock with a code sent to the customers' phone CREDIT: JUST EAT

Just Eat has plans to expand the use of robotic delivery drivers in the capital in a move that could long term see the number of human drivers employed by restaurants cut back. The robot, which has been tested in more than 40 cities across Europe, costs around £1 per delivery compared with the £3 to £6 it costs for a human courier.
 
"We are delighted to add robot home delivery to the Just Eat service," said Graham Corfield, UK managing director of Just Eat. "Now that we are live in Greenwich, we're working towards a larger rollout of the pilot programme across London in the New Year."
 
The futuristic courier, created by two former co-founders of Skype who launched Starship Technologies in 2014, is a six-wheeled automated trolley that travels at speeds of up to 4mph.
 
It can carry up to 10 kilograms or three shopping bags and has a range of 10 miles, meaning it can transport food within a two to three mile radius, which takes 15 to 30 minutes. The robot can direct itself and avoid obstacles using a GPS signal and nine cameras, but it is also monitored remotely at all times.
 
Customers cannot choose to have the Starship robot deliver food, but will be alerted in the app if one is on its way to them. When the robot arrives, the customer receives a notification with a code that unlocks the pavement robot. 

Author:  Cara McGoogan

Source:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Categorized in Internet Technology

Results of the “Web IQ” Quiz

American internet users’ knowledge of the modern technology landscape varies widely across a range of topics, according to a new knowledge quiz conducted by the Pew Research Center as part of its ongoing series commemorating the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web. To take the quiz for yourself before reading the full report, click here.

The survey—which was conducted among a nationally representative sample of 1,066 internet users—includes 17 questions on a range of issues related to technology, including: the meaning and usage of common online terms; recognition of famous tech figures; the history of some major technological advances; and the underlying structure of the internet and other technologies.

The “Web IQ” of American Internet Users

Substantial majorities of internet users are able to correctly answer questions about some common technology platforms and everyday internet usage terms. Around three-quarters know that a megabyte is bigger than a kilobyte, roughly seven in ten are able to identify pictures corresponding to terms like “captcha” and “advanced search,” and 66% know that a “wiki” is a tool that allows people to modify online content in collaboration with others. A substantial majority of online adults do not use Twitter, but knowledge of Twitter conventions is fairly widespread nonetheless: 82% of online Americans are aware that hashtags are most commonly used on the social networking platform, and 60% correctly answer that the service limits tweets to 140 characters.

On the other hand, relatively few internet users are familiar with certain concepts that underpin the internet and other modern technological advances. Only one third (34%) know that Moore’s Law relates to how many transistors can be put on a microchip, and just 23% are aware that “the Internet” and “the World Wide Web” do not, in fact, refer to the same thing.

Many online Americans also struggle with key facts relating to early—and in some cases, more recent—technological history. Despite an Oscar-winning movie (The Social Network) about the story of Facebook’s founding, fewer than half of internet users (42%) are able to identify Harvard as the first university to be on the site; and only 36% correctly selected 2007 as the year the first iPhone was released. The Mosaic web browser is an especially poorly-remembered pioneer of the early Web, as just 9% of online Americans are able to correctly identify Mosaic as the first widely popular graphical web browser.

When tested on their recognition of some individual technology leaders, a substantial 83% of online Americans are able to identify a picture of Bill Gates (although 10% incorrectly identified him as his long-time rival, former Apple CEO Steve Jobs). But just 21% are able to identify a picture of Sheryl Sandberg, a Facebook executive and author of the recent best-selling book Lean In.

Americans also have challenges accurately describing certain concepts relating to internet policy. Six in ten internet users (61%) are able to correctly identify the phrase “Net Neutrality” as referring to equal treatment of digital content by internet service providers. On the other hand, fewer than half (44%) are aware that when a company posts a privacy statement, it does not necessarily mean that they are actually keeping the information they collect on users confidential.

Age differences in web knowledge

Younger internet users are more knowledgeable about common usage terms, social media conventions

Younger internet users are more knowledgeable than their elders on some—but by no means all—of the questions on the survey. These differences are most pronounced on the questions dealing with social media, as well as common internet usage conventions. Compared with older Americans, younger internet users are especially likely to know that Facebook originated at Harvard University and that hashtags are commonly used on Twitter, to correctly identify pictures representing phrases like “captcha” and “advanced search,” and to understand the definition of a “wiki.”

At the same time, internet users of all ages are equally likely to believe—incorrectly—that the internet and the World Wide Web are the same thing. There are also no major age differences when it comes to the meaning of phrases like “Net Neutrality” or “privacy policy,” and older and younger internet users correctly identify pictures of Bill Gates and Sheryl Sandberg at comparable rates.

Educational differences in web knowledge

College grads more familiar with common tech terms

College graduates tend to score relatively highly on most Pew Research Center knowledge quizzes, and also tend to have high rates of usage for most consumer technologies. As such, it is perhaps not surprising that this group tends to do relatively well when it comes to knowledge of the internet and technology.

Compared with internet users who have not attended college, college graduates have much greater awareness of facts such as Twitter’s character limit, or the meaning of terms such as “URL” and “Net Neutrality.” Still, there are some elements of the technology world on which even this highly educated group rates poorly. For instance, just one in five correctly answered that the internet and World Wide Web are not the same thing, and only 12% know that Mosaic was the first widely available graphical web browser.

Author:  AARON SMITH

Source:  http://www.pewinternet.org/

Categorized in Internet Technology

With over 1 million apps in the Apple App Store, finding useful, must-have iPhone apps can be a difficult process.

The following is a list that showcases 21 of the best, must-have iPhone apps that you may not be familiar with, and includes iPhone applications for news, weather, productivity, games, photography, and finance.

If your favorite iPhone app isn’t on the list, tell us in the comments below!

News/Weather

#1: Umano

Too busy to read? With Umano, you can listen to articles from the world’s best publishers and bloggers narrated by professional voice-actors. Whether commuting, working out at the gym, or cooking at home, let Umano accompany you and enrich your day.

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#2: Prismatic

Prismatic is the home for all your interests. You select your interests and topics and Prismatic will curate and find stories based on the popularity of the post. You can comment on stories, talk with friends, and share the articles via Twitter and Facebook.

prismatic

#3: Feedly

Without Google Reader, Feedly has taken over as the de facto king of RSS news readers. You can import your Google RSS feeds into Feedly and easily share content on Twitter, Facebook and Google+, either directly or using Buffer. The app also integrates with Pocket, Instapaper and Evernote.

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#4: theCHIVE

theCHIVE is the world’s largest photo blog showcasing original galleries of funny photos & videos, epic fails, beautiful girls, groundbreaking photography, and art from all over the world.

theCHIVE

#5: Effing Weather

Tired of the same old weather app? Well, download the Effing Weather app and get over 100+ funny phrases that tell you the current weather such as:

– Are you Effing kidding me?
– Why don’t you tell your friends on Facebook how Effing hot it is
– For today’s Effing forecast, look outside

Productivity

#6: TalkTo

With TalkTo, you can text message with millions of local business in the US and Canada. You can see answers to other shoppers’ questions, and can ask your own.

talkto

#7: Glympse

Don’t text and drive. Glympse is the easiest way to safely share your location with someone in real time. Recipients receive a link allowing them to view your location in real-time.

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#8: Sunrise Calendar

Sunrise Calendar is by far my favorite calendar app. Some of my favorite features include the ability to see faces and profiles of people you are meeting with using LinkedIn, the weather forecast based on your location, and smart icons based on the topic of your meeting.

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#9: Clarity

Are you struggling with a certain part of your business? Clarity makes it easy for you to find, schedule and pay for expert advice over the phone to grow your business. Experts are categorized based on their specialties and you can see reviews for each expert before booking a call.

Games

#10: Fun Run

I don’t play too many games on the iPhone, but Fun Run is one that both my 5-year-old son and I enjoy. Fun Run is an online, real-time multi-player game where you can play with up to four players simultaneously. Play with your friends or get matched with random players from around the world!

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#11: Your Extra Life

YourExtraLife is a real-life game. You can progress by completing challenges in cooking, nightlife, romance, culture, altruism.

The app comes with pre-crafted challenges. To complete a challenge, you must submit a picture to prove it and judges within the community verify that your picture does match with the challenge.

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#12: Revel

Revel is a real-time, multiplayer, photo scavenger game. It combines game elements of bingo and a scavenger hunt where you hunt for and photograph people, scenarios and objects. Once you get 5 in a row – you win!

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#13: Lumosity

Designed by neuroscientists, Lumosity trains your memory and attention. Used by over 50 million people worldwide, Lumosity creates a Personalized Training Program that challenges your brain.

lumosity

#14: Find a Way, José

Find a Way, José is a great puzzle game where you attempt to move blocks in an effort to get the main character, José, to his bottle of tequila.

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Photos

#15: Cut Me In

Cut Me In is an easy to use app that allows you to crop yourself out of your original photo and superimpose yourself on a funny or unique background.

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#16: Momentage

With Momentage, you can craft and experience moments through combining photos, videos and SoundImages into a single post to create a vivid storytelling moment on your iPhone. Share your moments with the world or with just your friends.

momentage

#17: Frontback

Frontback takes a unique spin on the photo taking experience. Take a photo with the front camera, another with the back camera, and share them both in a single image.

frontback

#18: POP – Prototyping on Paper

Do you have an idea for an iPhone app? POP is one of the easiest way to quickly make a prototype. Draw your idea on paper, take a picture of your drawings, and finally link each screen in POP. You will have a working prototype within minutes.

pop

#19: 4 Snaps

Created by 16 year old teen, Michael Sayman, 4 Snaps is a social picture snapping and guessing game where you pick a word and take four pictures that best represent your chosen word. Then it’s your friend’s turn to guess the word based on your pictures.

4snaps

Finance

#20: Toshl

Toshl is a simple to use personal finance manager. It easily tracks income and expenses, organizes your bills, and allows you to manage your budget. New York Times says “of all the apps for monitoring spending, one of the hardest to beat is Toshl Finance.”

toshl

#21: Level Money

While a lot of finance apps show you a myriad of information (mostly meaningless), Level Money shows you exactly how much money you have left to spend given your budget. All you have to do is connect your bank account

Author:  Steve Young

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

Categorized in Internet Technology

Apple is plotting two research and development centers in China. The designer of consumer electronics cites stronger collaboration with “manufacturing partners” as a reason. That’s probably just a slice out of the real fruit that’s hanging over Apple’s head. Other likely reasons suggest Apple is keener than ever to hold onto its threatened status as a must-have brand for Chinese consumers.

Here are five other reasons Apple is pushing its R&D in China, according to views collected from tech industry analysts.

1. More iPhone sales. Apple once had a market of 25.4% in China, edging out Samsung in late 2014. It now lags local Android-based brands such as Huawei and OPPO, which led market share polls for the first time in June. In the second quarter of this year, Apple shipped 8.6 million smartphones, a 31.7% decline from a year ago. Huawei led with 19.1 million units, market research firm IDC reports. Sales of iPhones went on to fall 33% in the third quarter this year versus the same period of 2015. More R&D in China means access to employees of those local brands, who might defect over to Apple for the right salary package.

This picture taken on April 22, 2015 shows Chinese workers posing with a cheaper local alternative to the Apple Watch, made on their assembly line in a factory producing thousands every day in Shenzhen, in southern China’s Guangdong province. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

2. The image it’s tied to China’s economy. Like other foreign brands, Apple gets accused in China of just wanting to make money and leave. This image issue matters as the nationalistic Chinese find they can make smartphones on their own and need not depend on a foreign brand even if it’s a traditional status symbol. “Foreign companies in the past have been accused of capitalistic carpet bagging in China, so R&D is a good public relations move to show commitment to Chinese consumers,” says Danny Levinson, an early-stage tech investor with Matoka Capital in Beijing.

3. A better idea of what the Chinese user wants. Chinese consumers traditionally look to foreign brands for durability and status. But foreign developers, especially those with a one-size-fits-all model such as the iPhone, easily fail to match other expectations. About half of Chinese digital consumers use an electronic device while watching TV, for example, and “switching between different platforms is becoming more common,” Accenture found in a 2014 report. And because China’s middle class is new and shy, consumers prefer Android models over the iPhone for the price. The Beijing and Shenzhen R&D centers will help Apple grasp these trends by being close to some of China’s top tech firms and universities. Can it develop a $320 iPhone?

4. A lead over Google. Google has a troubled history in China over refusal to censor search results. It shut down its Chinese search engine in 2010 after a hack attack. But Chinese smartphone brands all use its Android operating system and you hear murmurings about the Silicon Valley software icon’s hope to expand R&D if not in China at least near it. That reentry would be a direct threat against Apple. “The first and obvious (concern) is that they do not want Google to be back in China and not them,” says Alicia Garcia, chief Asia Pacific economist with the French investment bank Natixis.

5. Reliable relationships with supplies. Apple’s supply chain depends increasingly on China in addition to its historical sourcesJapan, Korea and Taiwan. Shenzhen, site of Apple’s second planned Chinese R&D center after Beijing, is bubbling over with companies that can supply or assemble high-tech gear at decent prices. Desay Battery and Sunwoda Electronics provide batteries, for example. Apple has worked as well with BYD, a Shenzhen assembler and component maker. BYD ended up filing a patent lawsuit. Analysts still warn that Chinese companies will steal technology, sometimes for relaunch it as a knockoff brand. It’s clear why Apple needs stronger relations with suppliers.

Author:  Ralph Jennings

Source:  http://www.forbes.com/

Categorized in Internet Technology

Mobile has officially overtaken desktop as the primary means of using the internet.

Questioning this yet? Look no further than Google’s latest change in their algorithm. The internet search giant recently announced that they would release a mobile search index separate from their existing desktop index. This is the way Google scans websites and ultimately determines where sites come up in search rankings. This change alone is already a major change, but the clincher is the fact that this new mobile index will be the primary method of determining search ranking.

Considering how fast people are adopting smartphones and tablets, it’s a wise move that flows with the logical progression of the web. Desktop searches, once Google’s lifeline, have been overtaken and account for less than 45 percent of all searches done on the web for some time now. As it turns out, more often people do use mobile devices to look stuff up.

But now that this decision by Google to index sites via mobile first is here waiting to be rolled out, there are more questions than answers. How exactly is the mobile index going to work? How will this affect websites that put less content on their mobile site than their desktop site? How often will the desktop index be maintained?

The answers to these questions will be much clearer in the coming months, but it’s safe to say that the following insights can help your business plan ahead now:

Make your site mobile-friendly

You’d think most sites already have this, but a surprising number still don’t. If you’re one of those businesses who’ve been putting off a mobile version, you now don’t have much choice left but to adapt. Otherwise, your site will rank poorly on search engine result pages, and that’s something you don’t want to happen. Google takes into account in search rankings whether your site is mobile friendly or not.

Fill your mobile site with relevant content

Due to the compact sizes of handheld devices, a lot of mobile sites carry far less content than their desktop counterparts. This can make it for easier viewing on smaller screens. But with Google’s new algorithm, mobile sites will also have to be optimized, more so than desktop sites, and need to carry the full website content. No longer can there be a simpler mobile version with less content. If this is the case, that site will hurt in searches. The key would be to have a responsive website, one that “responds” to the device (mobile, tablet, desktop) that the user is on, and that at any device size it has the full website content.

Design a mobile strategy

Mobile used to be an alternative, an option. But things have changed. It’s now the default, relegating desktop queries to minority status. This means you need a mobile strategy more than ever. If you’re still attached to the desktop, you have to change your mindset and make mobile your primary concern. Font size, page load speed, scroll depth, and responsiveness are just some of the design elements you must consider for your mobile site. As well, lead capture is important to consider. How can you have a great mobile user experience that helps you capture leads? That’s a great strategy piece to have in place!

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The world is going mobile, and so should your site. Google is already at the helm, so act now if you don’t want to be left behind.

Mike Gingerich is President of Digital Hill Multimedia (www.DigitalHill.com), a Goshen web design and marketing agency. He is also a co-founder of TabSite.com and Waftio.com, leading software tools for contests and lead capture. Listen to his social media and web podcast, Halftime Mike, available on iTunes and at www.MikeGingerich.com.

Author:  Mike Ginerich

Source:  http://www.goshennews.com/

Categorized in News & Politics

Gartner, Inc.

Increasingly, the world is becoming an intelligent, digitally enabled mesh of people, things and services. Technology will be embedded in everything in the digital business of the future, and ordinary people will experience a digitally-enabled world where the lines between what is real and what is digital blur.

Rich digital services will be delivered to everything, and intelligence will be embedded in everything behind the scenes. We call this mesh of people, devices, content and services the intelligent digital mesh, and this forms the basis for our Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017.

Gartners Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends For 2017

Intelligent

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning have reached a critical tipping point and will increasingly augment and extend virtually every technology enabled service, thing or application. Creating intelligent systems that learn, adapt and potentially act autonomously rather than simply execute predefined instructions is primarily battleground for technology vendors through at least 2020.

Trend No. 1: AI & Advanced Machine Learning

AI and machine learning, which include technologies such as deep learningneural networks and natural-language processing, can also encompass more advanced systems that understand, learn, predict, adapt and potentially operate autonomously. Systems can learn and change future behavior, leading to the creation of more intelligent devices and programs.  The combination of extensive parallel processing power, advanced algorithms and massive data sets to feed the algorithms has unleased this new era.

In banking, you could use AI and machine-learning techniques to model current real-time transactions, as well as predictive models of transactions based on their likelihood of being fraudulent. Organizations seeking to drive digital innovation with this trend should evaluate a number of business scenarios in which AI and machine learning could drive clear and specific business value and consider experimenting with one or two high-impact scenarios.

Trend No. 2: Intelligent Apps

Intelligent apps, which include technologies like virtual personal assistants (VPAs), have the potential to transform the workplace by making everyday tasks easier (prioritizing emails) and its users more effective (highlighting important content and interactions). However, intelligent apps are not limited to new digital assistants – every existing software category from security tooling to enterprise applications such as marketing or enterprise resource planning (ERP) will be infused with AI enabled capabilities. Using AI, technology providers will focus on three areas — advanced analytics, AI-powered and increasingly autonomous business processes and AI-powered immersive, conversational and continuous interfaces. By 2018, Gartner expects most of the world’s largest 200 companies to exploit intelligent apps and utilize the full toolkit of big data and analytics tools to refine their offers and improve customer experience.

Trend No. 3: Intelligent Things

New intelligent things generally fall into three categories: robots, drones and autonomous vehicles. Each of these areas will evolve to impact a larger segment of the market and support a new phase of digital business but these represent only one facet of intelligent things. Existing things including Internet of Things (IoT) devices will become intelligent things delivering the power of AI enabled systems everywhere including the home, office, factory floor, and medical facility.

As intelligent things evolve and become more popular, they will shift from a stand-alone to a collaborative model in which intelligent things communicate with one another and act in concert to accomplish tasks. However, nontechnical issues such as liability and privacy, along with the complexity of creating highly specialized assistants, will slow embedded intelligence in some scenarios.

Digital

The lines between the digital and physical world continue to blur creating new opportunities for digital businesses. Look for the digital world to be an increasingly detailed reflection of the physical world and the digital world to appear as part of the physical world creating fertile ground for new business models and digitally enabled ecosystems.

Trend No. 4: Virtual & Augmented Reality

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) transform the way individuals interact with each other and with software systems creating an immersive environment. For example, VR can be used for training scenarios and remote experiences. AR, which enables a blending of the real and virtual worlds, means businesses can overlay graphics onto real-world objects, such as hidden wires on the image of a wall. Immersive experiences with AR and VR are reaching tipping points in terms of price and capability but will not replace other interface models. Over time AR and VR expand beyond visual immersion to include all human senses. Enterprises should look for targeted applications of VR and AR through 2020.

Trend No. 5: Digital Twin

Within three to five years, billions of things will be represented by digital twins, a dynamic software model of a physical thing or system. Using physics data on how the components of a thing operate and respond to the environment, as well as data provided by sensors in the physical world, a digital twin can be used to analyze and simulate real world conditions, responds to changes, improve operations and add value.

Author:  David Cearley

Source:  http://www.forbes.com

Categorized in Future Trends

Personally, I’m amazed at the technology we have available to us. It’s astounding to have the power to retrieve almost any information and communicate in a thousand different ways using a device that fits in your pocket.

There’s always something new on the horizon, and we can’t help but wait and wonder what technological marvels are coming next.

The way I see it, there are seven major tech trends we’re in store for in 2017. If you’re eyeing a sector in which to start a business, any of these is a pretty good bet. If you’re already an entrepreneur, think about how you can leverage these technologies to reach your target audience in new ways.

1. IoT and Smart Home Tech.

We’ve been hearing about the forthcoming revolution of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) and resulting interconnectedness of smart home technology for years. So what’s the holdup? Why aren’t we all living in smart, connected homes by now? Part of the problem is too much competition, with not enough collaboration—there are tons of individual appliances and apps on the market, but few solutions to tie everything together into a single, seamless user experience. Now that bigger companies already well-versed in uniform user experiences (like Google, Amazon, and Apple) are getting involved, I expect we’ll see some major advancements on this front in the coming year.

2. AR and VR.

We’ve already seen some major steps forward for augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) technology in 2016. Oculus Rift was released, to positive reception, and thousands of VR apps and games followed. We also saw Pokémon Go, an AR game, explode with over 100 million downloads. The market is ready for AR and VR, and we’ve already got some early-stage devices and tech for these applications, but it’s going to be next year before we see things really take off. Once they do, you’ll need to be ready for AR and VR versions of practically everything—and ample marketing opportunities to follow.

3. Machine Learning.

Machine learning has taken some massive strides forward in the past few years, even emerging to assist and enhance Google’s core search engine algorithm. But again, we’ve only seen it in a limited range of applications. Throughout 2017, I expect to see machine learning updates emerge across the board, entering almost any type of consumer application you can think of, from offering better recommended products based on prior purchase history to gradually improving the user experience of an analytics app. It won’t be long before machine learning becomes a kind of “new normal,” with people expecting this type of artificial intelligence as a component of every form of technology.

4. Automation.

Marketers will be (mostly) pleased to learn that automation will become a bigger mainstay in and throughout 2017, with advanced technology enabling the automation of previously human-exclusive tasks. We’ve had robotic journalists in circulation for a couple of years now, and I expect it won’t be long before they make another leap into more practical types of articles. It’s likely that we’ll start seeing productivity skyrocket in a number of white-collar type jobs—and we’ll start seeing some jobs disappear altogether. When automation is combined with machine learning, everything can improve even faster, so 2017 has the potential to be a truly landmark year.

5. Humanized Big Data. (visual, empathetic, qualitative)

Big data has been a big topic for the past five years or so, when it started making headlines as a buzzword. The idea is that mass quantities of gathered data—which we now have access to—can help us in everything from planning better medical treatments to executing better marketing campaigns. But big data’s greatest strength—its quantitative, numerical foundation—is also a weakness. In 2017, I expect we’ll see advancements to humanize big data, seeking more empathetic and qualitative bits of data and projecting it in a more visualized, accessible way.

6. Physical-Digital Integrations.

Mobile devices have been slowly adding technology into our daily lives. It’s rare to see anyone without a smartphone at any given time, giving us access to practically infinite information in the real-world. We already have things like site-to-store purchasing, enabling online customers to buy and pick up products in a physical retail location, but the next level will be even further integrations between physical and digital realities. Online brands like Amazon will start having more physical products, like Dash Buttons, and physical brands like Walmart will start having more digital features, like store maps and product trials.

7. Everything On-Demand.

Thanks to brands like Uber (and the resulting madness of startups built on the premise of being the “Uber of ____”), people are getting used to having everything on demand via phone apps. In 2017, I expect this to see this develop even further. We have thousands of apps available to us to get rides, food deliveries, and even a place to stay for the night, but soon we’ll see this evolve into even stranger territory.

Anyone in the tech industry knows that making predictions about the course of technology’s future, even a year out, is an exercise in futility. Surprises can come from a number of different directions, and announced developments rarely release as they’re intended.

Still, it pays to forecast what’s coming next so you can prepare your marketing strategies (or your budget) accordingly. Whatever the case may be, it’s still fun to think about everything that’s coming next.

Author:  Jayson DeMers

Source:  http://www.forbes.com/

Categorized in Future Trends

Google has launched a new website called AI Experiments, which offers curious minds a peek into the technology that is based on machine learning.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the next big thing in the field of technology and with Google and its products like Google Allo, you can see for yourself the power of AI. The company has launched a new website called AI Experiments which allows gives you a peek into some of its most experimental projects. One doesn’t need to be a certified engineer to test the web apps. These projects are aimed at offering users a glimpse into the functioning of neural networks with the help of fun games.

The concept of artificial intelligence and machine learning which is at the heart of Internet of Things is very erudite for a regular consumer. Google intends to change that with its AI Experiments where it has multiple games and puzzles powered by artificial intelligence. The platform is open source, which means if you start exploring AI and want to build something of your own for the world to see, Google could showcase it on the website. Currently, there are a set of simple experiments which allow users to explore the technology through pictures, drawings music, language, and more.

According to Google, the idea behind open-sourcing the platform is to make the technology more accessible to people irrespective of whether they have a background in machine learning or not. It is also aimed at those curious minds who are interested in the technology but lack the technical know-how. The website includes open-source code and resources to help interested people get started.

The site currently offers hands-on demos that allow users to interact with projects which have been created by Google researchers. A project called ‘Quick, Draw!’ is a game that guesses the object you are drawing using a neural net. For example, if you are drawing a fan or a bicycle, the game tries to guess what the object could be. Another project, called ‘ AI Duet’, applies the power of AI to music. Once you play a few notes on a computer-connected keyboard, the algorithm plays a few notes of its own based on what you played to perform a duet.

There are also a couple of apps which show off Google’s progress with AI. The ‘Giorgio Cam’, similar to the guessing game, tries to identify objects which are placed in front of a smartphone camera and turns them into lyrics to a song. A second app called ‘Thing Translator’, uses Google’s translation technology to translate objects you point at into different languages. For example, if you don’t know what a glass is called in Japanese, the app could translate the object for you in the language to help you understand.

The AI Experiments website further opens into Google’s other projects including Chrome Experiments, Android Experiments, and Arts& Culture Experiments. All these experiments are user- generated creative experiments such as the Giant Emoji, which translates your facial expressions into a large emoji displayed on a screen. Under the Arts & Culture experiments, a project titled Free Fall, uses mathematical formulas to place artworks in a 3D environment, where one can choose to visualize what a cultural big bang might look like, or travel through the sea of artworks decade by decade.

The company also added a new feature to its Translate app with the use of Neural Machine Translation. The Google Translate is primarily focused on using Phase-Based Machine Translation as the key algorithm. With the Neural Machine Translation, the app will now be able to translate whole sentences at a time and not just in parts. As of now, not all the 108 languages on Google Translate will be equipped with Neural Machine Translation. The system will work only on eight major languages which include English, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Turkish. The system will soon be rolled out to the remaining 103 languages and other platforms where Google Translate can be accessed.

Author:  Deepali Moray

Source:  http://www.bgr.in/

Categorized in News & Politics
1. The term “surfing” the internet was coined in 1992 by an upstate New York librarian Jean Armour Polly, aka “Net Mom.”
2. The most played song on Spotify is “Wake Me Up” by Avicii.
3. The first tweet was sent on March 21, 2006 by Jack Dorsey:
 

4. Mark Zuckerberg’s original Facebook profile number ID is 4.
5. The first YouTube video was uploaded April 23, 2005. It’s called “Me at the zoo,” and features Jawed Karim, one of the founders, at the San Diego Zoo.
6. A single Google query uses 1,000 computers in 0.2 seconds to retrieve an answer.
7. The original Space Jam website is still live.
8. So is the You’ve Got Mail site.
9. 16% to 20% of the searches Geoogle gets each day have never been Googled before.
10. Chinese social network Sina Weibo has 280.8 million users.
11. Twitter has 250 million users.
12. 500 milion tweets are sent ever day.
13. Tila Tequila had 1.5 million friends on Myspace.
14. The inventor of the modern world wide web, Tim Berners-Lee, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth.
15. Mr. Berners-Lee uploaded the first image to the internet. It is of a joke band of women from the nuclear research lab CERN.
16. The first website is still online.
17. The most commonly searched question beginning with “What is” in 2013 was “What is twerking?
18. The most expensive keyword for Google AdWords is “insurance.”
19. The GIF format was invented by Steve Wilke, an engineer at Compuserve in 1987.
20. Mr. Wilhite maintains the correct pronunciation of the term is “jiff.”
21. He is clearly wrong.
25. Today, the Internet is 8,354 days old. Check HowOldIsTheInter.net to keep up to date.
26. “Gangnam Style” by Psy is still the most viewed YouTube video of all time. It’s been viewed over two billion times.
27. The first email was sent in 1971 by Ray Tomlinson to himself. He doesn’t remember what it said.
28. The first spam email was sent in 1978 over ARPNET by a guy named Gary Thuerk. He was selling computers.
29. The first registered domain was symbolics.com.
30. The world record for the fastest time to log into a Gmail account is 1.16 seconds.
31. The world record for fastest texter is held by a Brazilian teenager.
32. This is what Google looked like in 2004:
33. 2.58 million people still pay for AOL.
34. It cost AOL over $300 million to mail all those CD-Roms back in the day.
35. At one point, AOL accounted for about 50% of all CD-Rom discs being made.
36. It took only 5 years for the internet to reach a market audience of 50 million users.
37. This is what Facebook looked like in 2004:
38. There were over 7 million Geocities sites before it was shut down in 2009.
39. Angelfire is still up.40. Mark Zuckerberg had a pretty sweet Angelfire page.
41. One million babies have been born from people who met on Match.com.
42. Online daters spend an average of $2
43. per year on online dating.
44. 33% of female online daters have had sex on the first online date.
45. 10% of sex offenders use online dating.
46. The Amazon logo is indicating you can get everything from A to Z (look at the arrow):
47. Before the world wide web (the modern internet invented in 1989, people traded ASCII porn on the internet during the ’70s and ’80s.
48. We now spend more time browsing the web on mobile devices than desktop computers.
 
49. There is a subreddit devoted to chicken nuggets that look like other things.
50. This is the NeXT computer that Tim Berners-Lee used to create the World Wide Web:
Source:  buzzfeed.com
Categorized in Internet Technology
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