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SEO has been changing drastically over the years.

In 2010, Google made 516 algorithm changes. That number increased to 1,653 in 2016 and to 3,234 in 2018. We don’t have data for the last couple of years, but still, you can bet that the number is continually going up.

With over 9 algorithm changes a day, it’s safe to say that it is no longer easy to manipulate or game Google.

So, is SEO dead?

Well, let’s look at the data and from there I’ll show you what you should do.

Is SEO dead?

Do you know how many searches take place on Google each day?

Roughly 5.6 billion searches per day.

That’s roughly 2 trillion searches each year.

Although that’s a lot of searches, there is also a lot of content being created.

There are roughly a billion blogs on the web.

There are so many blogs that you can find an excessive amount of content on most topics out there.

For example, if you look at the long-tail phrase, “what is digital marketing”, there are only 11,300 global searches a month but a whopping 665,000 pieces of content trying to answer that question.

In other words, the supply is much greater than the demand.

You’ll see even more of this for head terms. Just look at the phrase “banana”:

640,300 global searches seem like a high number but there are 880,000,000 million results. Sure, some of those results may not be on the food, banana, but still, that’s a lot of content compared to the search volume.

You can still find search phrases where there is more search volume than content but the trend is continually increasing in which content production is exceeding search demand.

On top of that, Google is turning into an answer engine in which they are answering people’s questions without them having to go to a website.

According to Dejan SEO, they saw CTRs drastically decrease once Google started answering questions. Just look at this weather search query:

Their clicks from weather-related queries went from 46% all the way down to 7%.

This trend has become so common that the percentage of traffic that Google drives to organic listings (SEO results) has been decreasing over time.

So, does this mean SEO is dead?

It’s actually the opposite.

SEO is not dead

With all of the data, how can that be the case?

First off, all marketing channels become statured over time. It’s just a question of when.

You can say the same thing about Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and even email marketing.

Heck, just look at the image below. It was the first banner ad on the Internet. 

Can you guess what company created that banner ad? It was ATT.

Of the people who saw it, 44% of them clicked on it. Now banner ads generate an average click-through rate of 0.5%.

That’s an enormous drop.

And, as I mentioned above, it’s with all channels. Just look at Instagram engagement rates:

 

It doesn’t matter if it is a sponsored post or an organic post, the trend on Instagram is that engagement is going down.

That’s why you are seeing people like Gary Vaynerchuk and Grant Cardone promoting their phone numbers all over Instagram.

 

That way they can communicate with their fans directly without having to deal with algorithms or platforms decreasing their engagement.

But even with those decreasing numbers, you are seeing sponsored posts on Instagram surging by 150%.

In other words, people are still spending money because they are seeing an ROI or generating enough value in their eyes.

And the same is happening with digital ad spending.

The numbers are on the rise because companies are generating an ROI.

So, how is SEO still not dead?

As I explained above, just because the metrics aren’t going in your favor doesn’t mean that a channel is dead.

Just look at my search traffic on NeilPatel.com.

Not only do I have to deal with Google’s algorithm like you, but my competition includes other marketers who know what I know… yet I am still able to grow my search traffic even with Google’s decreasing CTRs.

When you look at search as a whole (and I am not only talking about on Bing and Google as people also search on other sites and platforms as well) Google still dominates market share with a whopping 92.6 percent.

 

People still use Google and prefer them as their method of search. But what’s changed is how Google is being used.

It used to be where you would use platforms like Instagram for discovery and Google for commerce (purchasing).

The trend has switched over the years in which Instagram is being heavily used for commerce and Google is mainly used as a discovery engine.

Just look at this case study by Olay.

Olay sells products related to skincare. One of their products happens to reduce darkness under your eyes.

So, they used to push heavily on ads that sold their products directly.

 

But the moment they changed their ads to focus on education by teaching people how to reduce dark circles under their eyes instead of forcing people to buy their products, their ROI went through the roof.

By sending people to educational-based content first (and then selling through the content), they were able to increase click-throughs by 87%, decrease their cost per click by 30%, and increase conversions by 100%.

This is a prime example of how more people are using Google as a discovery engine first instead of a commerce engine.

SEO isn’t dying it is just changing

Now that you know that Google is shifting to a discovery engine (for both paid and organic listings), there are a few other things you need to know if you want to dominate the organic listings.

1: Google wants to rank sites you want to see

Their algorithm core focus isn’t backlinks or keyword density, or a specific SEO metric… the focus is on the user experience.

If a site has millions of backlinks but users hate it, the site won’t rank well in the long run.

Look at this case study of the “best-grilled steaks.”

Rand Fishkin had all of his social followers do the following:

Within 70 minutes, the listing jumped to the top spot.

This is what I mean by user signals. You, the end-user, control how Google adjusts rankings.

2. People don’t just use Google. Google gathers data from everywhere.

Google knows you spend hours a day on your mobile device and hours on other sites and applications that aren’t controlled or owned by Google.

So, when they are figuring out what to rank and where to rank it, they aren’t just looking at their own dataset.

They crawl things like social media and use social signals to help them better improve their results.

For example, here is a case study on how Google is using social media for search discovery.

Even if you hate the social web, you need to use it more. Not only can it help with your site’s indexing but it can also help with brand building, which indirectly will help boost your rankings as well.

Here are some articles to follow to help boost your social media presence:

  • How to Gain 1,260 Instagram Followers per Week
  • 16 Powerful Facebook Marketing Tips That Actually Work
  • The Complete Guide to Using Twitter to Grow Your Business
  • 9 LinkedIn Marketing Tips
  • How to Hack YouTube
  • The Ultimate Guide to Pinterest Marketing
  • 4 Principles of Successful Snapchat Marketing

3. Google loves brands

If you don’t believe me, just look at these quotes from Google’s ex-CEO and ex-head of webspam.

They both believe in brands.

As your brand grows, you’ll find that your rankings will climb as well.

You saw my search traffic stats earlier in the post, but here’s a breakdown of how many people found my site by searching for my name in the last 7 days.

And that number doesn’t even include the misspellings. You would be shocked at how many people spell my name as “niel” instead of “neil.”

Google loves brands. Heck, when you type in “men’s running shoes,” they even have Nike, Adidas, and Asics there.

Read More...

[Source: This article was published in neilpatel.com By Neil Patel - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]
Categorized in Market Research

WHEN IT COMES to looking something up on the web, most of us default to Googling it—the search engine has become so dominant that it's now a verb, in the same way that Photoshop is. But using Google for your searches comes with a privacy trade-off.

Google's business is, of course, based on advertising, and every search you make feeds into the profile of you that it uses to target the ads you see around the web. While Google isn't telling marketing firms what searches you're running, it is using those queries to build up a picture of you that ads can be sold against.

While Google has made moves to limit this data collection—introducing tools for auto-deleting your web history after a certain time period, for example—you might want to switch to a different search provider that doesn't log your queries. And if you want to stick with Google, there are ways to limit the amount of data that gets recorded.

Brave Search

braveBrave isn't going to keep track of what you're looking for. SCREENSHOT: DAVID NIELD VIA BRAVE

Having previously been known for a privacy-focused browser, Brave has now launched its own search engine—albeit one that's labeled as a beta product, so expect the occasional bug and technical issue to appear. Even at this early stage, it's impressively comprehensive, and of course, you're trying it as much for its security and privacy as for the results you get.

Simply put, no logs of your queries are kept by the search engine. While that might make for a slightly less convenient user experience—Google might automatically know you're more interested in the Miami Dolphins than actual dolphins, for instance—it does mean that you can search without worrying that you're going to see any related advertising.

"It's impossible for us to share, sell, or lose your data because we don’t collect it in the first place," says Brave. While the service might eventually become ad-supported, those adverts won't know anything about you or what you've been looking for on the web, making it distinctly different from Google's offering.

You can access the Brave search engine from any web browser and any device (you don't have to use the Brave browser to use it). Getting around the interface is as simple and straightforward as you would expect: Simply type out your query, hit Enter, and wait for the results to show up. You can look for Images, News, or Videos as well as websites using the buttons at the top of the results page.

You'll also see drop-down menus above your search results that let you filter them by location and time. Depending on what keywords you've used, you might also see a Local results tab—this will temporarily make use of your IP address to find results from regional sites, but this IP address isn't saved. As soon as you close down the Brave search tab, everything is forgotten.

DuckDuckGo Search

duckduckgo searchDuckDuckGo is simple, secure, and private. SCREENSHOT: DAVID NIELD VIA DUCKDUCKGO
 

DuckDuckGo has been around for much longer than the Brave search engine, and so it has more in the way of features and options. Its focus is the same: to help you search the web privately, without your queries being registered. It pulls data from hundreds of different sources, including the Microsoft Bing search engine and Apple Maps.

As with the Brave search engine, your searches are never logged or recorded—every time you turn up at the DuckDuckGo portal, you're seen as a new user. You will notice advertising alongside the search results that you get through DuckDuckGo, but these ads aren't targeted, and the advertising networks behind them don't know anything about you.

"Our privacy policy is simple: we don’t collect or share any of your personal information," says DuckDuckGo, which also develops a browser extension and mobile apps for Android and iOS. You don't need to register an account with the service, and you won't find a history of your searches anywhere in DuckDuckGo, making it impossible for the company to monetize them. The portal is now handling about 80 million searches a day.

DuckDuckGo is very straightforward to use: Just type your query into the main search box and hit the Enter key to get started. For certain queries, like celebrity names or places that can be found on a map, you might see pop-out boxes alongside your main search results. For topical searches, a few recent news updates might be included too.

Along the top of the search results list, you'll see ways of filtering the matches that you're seeing. You can focus on Images, Videos, News, Maps, or Shopping for example, as well as set filters based on location or the time that a page was last updated. Use the Settings link on the right to change the appearance of the results page and to change various other DuckDuckGo options.

Limiting Google

google
You can break the connection between Google Chrome and your Google account. SCREENSHOT: DAVID NIELD VIA GOOGLE

It's worth bearing in mind that if you're using Google Chrome and you're signed into Google, you may well be syncing your DuckDuckGo or Brave searches back to your Google account. Your Google web history and your Chrome browsing history (if you're signed into Google) will match up most of the time because Google keeps them in sync by default, partly to make it easier to use Google across multiple devices.

To stop this from happening in Chrome, click the three dots in the top right-hand corner, then choose Settings. If you see that you're signed in to your Google account at the very top, click Turn off—this will break the connection between Google and your browser, and you'll be given the option to delete all the data that's stored locally on your device (including your browsing history, bookmarks, and stored passwords).

Perhaps an easier option is to simply switch to another browser altogether—as we've already mentioned, Brave has one. Other good cross-platform alternatives to Chrome are Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, and Safari from Apple—but whichever one you switch to, be sure to check out the settings for deleting your browsing history as you go. (All of these browsers have simple-to-use options for this.)

Whichever browser you decide to use, opening up a private or incognito window while you're searching will prevent those searches from being logged inside the browser—as soon as you close the window, the search is gone forever. Bear in mind that these modes don't necessarily stop online companies from tracking your queries though. (If you sign into your Google account while in private mode, Google will still be able to track you.)

If you can't bring yourself to be parted from the search results that Google serves up, you can at least make sure that they're not remembered for too long. Open up your Google account settings page on the web, then click Data & personalization and Web & App Activity: You can choose either Manage activity to remove history and searches manually, or select the Auto-delete option to have this data wiped automatically once it's been stored for a certain amount of time.

[Source: This article was published in wired.com By David Nield - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin]

Categorized in How to

Google has become so synonymous with the search that the company’s name has found its way into the dictionary as a verb—and all those times you’ve asked Google something can reveal a lot about your life, from the medical conditions you’ve been worried about, to where you’ve been on your vacations.

With so much sensitive data involved, you want to make sure that your search history is safe from prying eyes. There are ways to make extra sure that no one else can get a glimpse at what you’ve been searching for, and to block Google itself from knowing anything about your online queries.

Put a password on your Google search history

Google Search Password Option

Use extra verification on computers that other people have easy access to. David Nield

Your Google account is protected both by a password and two-factor authentication if you’ve switched that on (we recommend you do). That should minimize the risk of anyone else being able to log into your Google account and take a peek at what you’ve been searching for.

However, if you’re on a computer where you’re regularly logged into Google, your browser has your password saved, and other people (maybe housemates or colleagues) are likely to be wandering past, you might feel like an additional layer of security is required.

That’s perhaps why Google has introduced an extra password step just for your search history. Even if someone makes it to your Google account page, they’ll need your password to enter the search history section.

You can enable this by going to your Google account page, then clicking Data & personalization, Web & App Activity, Manage activity, and Manage my activity verification. Choose Require extra verification, then click Save.

Automatically delete your Google searches

Delete Google Search History

Google can clean up your search history after a set period of time. David Nield

Google will automatically clean up your search history if you want it to. Go to your Google account page, then click Data & personalization, Web & App Activity, and Auto-delete. On the next screen, you can delete search history data older than three months, 18 months, or 36 months.

If you choose Manage activity rather than Auto-delete, you can manually wipe everything you’ve ever searched for or just some of it. Use the search and filter options at the top to look for something specific, and either the Delete box at the top of the X buttons next to individual entries to erase what you want to erase.

Google has also added the option to delete just the last 15 minutes of your search history. For the time being, this is only available in the Google app for Android and iOS, though it should roll out to the web interface soon.

From inside the app, tap your profile picture (top right), then tap Delete last 15 min. You can also choose Search history instead, which gives you access to the screens we’ve already looked at. From here you can manually or automatically delete queries you’ve run through Google on the web.

Avoid Google entirely

Google Incognito Mode

Incognito mode keeps no record of your searches. David Nield

Another way to keep your Google search history private is not to allow Google to log it in the first place. If you open up an incognito or private window in your browser of choice before visiting Google and running your search, it won’t be recorded—as soon as you close the window, the browser (and Google) will forget the query ever happened.

In Google Chrome, for example, click the three dots in the top right-hand corner of the browser interface and choose New Incognito Window from the menu that appears. In Microsoft Edge, click the three dots (top right) then New InPrivate Window; in Firefox, click the three lines (top right), then New Private Window; and in Safari you can click File and New Private Window.

 

When you start off in an incognito or private browser window, you won’t be signed into any of your accounts, including your Google one. Make sure you don’t sign in to Google during the browsing session though—otherwise Google will log your search requests as normal, even if you’re using a private browsing mode.

You also have the option to run your web searches elsewhere: You can pick from Microsoft’s Bing or the privacy-focused DuckDuckGo, for instance. The developers behind the browser Brave have also launched a web search engine that you can try, which doesn’t track you or anything that you’re searching for.

Manage your browsing history and syncing

Clear Google Browsing Data

Your web browser has history clean-up options of its own. David Nield

If you use Chrome while signed in to your Google account, everything you search for on Google will be saved to the browser and your Google account. These lists of queries are one and the same, though the lists might be presented slightly differently. You can see your history in Chrome by clicking the three dots (top right) and then choosing History.

Having this setup also means you can delete your history from your browser as well as your Google account page on the web. From the History screen, you can select individual entries and then choose Delete, or click Clear browsing data for some more comprehensive options. Select Browsing history and the time period you want to cover, then select Clear data.

At the bottom of the dialog, you’ll see whether or not you’re signed into Google. If you want to clear the history in the local Chrome browser without affecting the history records in your Google account, you’ll need to sign out of Google first to break the sync—then repeat the steps that we’ve outlined above.

If you’re using a browser other than Chrome, you’ll have two separate search and browsing histories to think about: The one stored by Google and the one stored by your browser (unless you’re using private mode for all your searches). SafariEdge, and Firefox all have helpful options for clearing the history logged in your browser, across whatever time period you like, but you need to remember to run these wipes regularly.

[Source: This article was published in popsci.com By David Nield - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]

Categorized in Search Engine

Finding people in this tech-dependant world is as easy as walking in the park. All you need is the right tool to go about it. Today, you can easily track down someone’s information through their name, address, phone number, email address, or any other identity detail.

People Search Engines: How to use them?

People search engines are widely popular today as they help in finding the whereabouts of a person. It is similar to using a web search engine, so instead of adding the search term, you need to add the name or other vital details about the person.

Why Use People Search Engine?

A people search engine is a website that stores multiple information about a large number of people and provides it to people who need it. There are a bunch of reasons why people would want to search for other people. Instead of visiting the local clerk’s office and getting the old school way, you can think about the people search engine.

A search engine for people’s information is a platform like Radaris you can find by the link above; it helps locate a person you cannot find anywhere else. Whether it is to find your schoolmate after years or conduct an identity verification of your new employee, the people search engine. All you need to do is lookout for people search engines that can prove helpful tools for people searching.

Most of the software is free to use, which means you can search for information for free. Some provide one or two searches for free, so you need to opt for the paid subscription. Either way, you can avail yourself of the advanced searching services from these tools.

Many people are searching for software in the market that may confuse you, so it is always better to conduct thorough research and choose your ideal one.

What Details Can You Search On These Search Tools?

Here are the details you could find on these tools:

  • Full name
  • Age
  • Mailing address
  • Social media accounts
  • Resumes and employment history
  • Death, divorce, and marriage
  • Videos, pictures, and more
  • How To Use A People Search Engine?

Now that you have understood the potential and importance of people search engines, you would want to know how you can start using one. Using these search tools is super easy, which is why these are so popular among people. You don’t require any special training or assistance to start using the tools.

Here are the steps you need to follow to use people search engine:

Download or Visit The People Search Engine

The first and most crucial step to get started is to visit the people search engine or download the software. It depends on the platform you choose to search for people. Before making a move, it is imperative to understand everything about the platform. Make sure to check the license and regulation of the software and ensure its legitimacy.

Add The Details

The next crucial step is to add all the details to get you the information regarding the person. In most of the software, you will need to add first name, last name, city, zip code, etc. It is an essential step, so you need to pay close attention to it. Some people’s search engines are filled with information from multiple locations, so you have to be specific with your details.

Hit The Search Button

After adding all the information, all you need to do is to hit the search button. If you happen to choose reliable software, you will get faster and legit details. So, it depends on the platform you choose. Some software may require some of your details before it provides you the information. Check whether the platform offers free services or has a paid subscription.

The Bottom Line

People’s search engines are way too popular than you can imagine. These are advanced search tools to find people just by adding their name or contact number. People search tools come in handy in different situations. Hence, it is essential to learn how to use these search tools.

The above mentioned were the steps you need to follow to start using a people search engine in the right way. Make sure to understand the features and benefits a particular tool offers and then avail of its services.

Always choose a credible and reliable website that will make your searching experience worthwhile.

[Source: This article was published in abcmoney.co.uk By Debora Marcus - Uploaded by the Association Member: Anna K. Sasaki]
Categorized in Search Engine

Ever Google search for your own name? Even if you haven’t, there’s a good chance that a friend, family member or potential employer will at some point. And when they do, do you know everything that they’ll find?

Google is chock full of personal information you may not always want public. Whether it’s gathered by the search engine itself or scummy people-search websites, you have a right to know what kind of data other people can access when they look up your name. Tap or click here to see how to remove yourself from people search sites.

What others see about you online can mean the difference in landing a job or spending more time looking for one. If you want to take control of your reputation online, here’s why you need to start searching for yourself before others beat you to it.

Use exact phrases to find more than mentions

To get started with searching yourself on Google, it’s important to know how to search for exact phrases. This means telling Google you want to look up the words you typed exactly as you typed them — with no splitting terms or looking up one word while ignoring others.

To do this, simply search for your name (or any term) in quotation marks. As an example, look up “Kim Komando” and include quotation marks. Now, Google won’t show results for Kim Kardashian along with Komando.com.

Using exact phrases will weed out results for other people with similar names to yours. If you have a more common name, you may have to go through several pages before finding yourself.

If you aren’t finding anything or your name is very common, use your name plus modifiers like the city or state you live in, the names of your school(s), the name of the company you work for or other details. Make note of anything that you don’t feel comfortable with others finding and either write down the web addresses or bookmark them.

A picture says a thousand words

After you’ve saved the websites you want to go over, switch over to Google’s Image Search and scan through any pictures of you. It’s much easier to look through hundreds of images quickly versus hundreds of links, and you might be surprised at the images and websites you find.

If you find an image that concerns you, you can run a reverse image search to see where it’s hosted. To do this, follow these steps:

  • Open Google Image Search and click the Camera icon in the search bar
  • Paste a link to the image or upload the image you want to search for.
  • Your results will be shown as a combination of images and relevant websites. If an exact match is found, it will populate at the top of your results.

If the image has no text on it or any identifying information, don’t worry. Your image can turn up even if it only has your face.

Where you are and where you’ve been

Next, you’ll want to run a search for your past and current email addresses and phone numbers. This helps you see which sites have access to this personal data and will also show you what others can find if they look this information up.

If you’ve ever signed up for a discussion board or forum with your personal email address, your post history could easily show up if someone Googles you. The same can be said for social media pages and blogs. Find and make note of any posts or content that you’d prefer to make private.

Finally, run a search for your social media account usernames. Try to remember any usernames you may have used online and look those up. For example, if you search for the username “kimkomando,” you’ll turn up Kim’s Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram accounts.

If you can’t remember, try searching for your name (as an exact phrase in quotation marks) plus the social network you want to look up. This might reveal accounts that you forgot about or that are less private than you think. If your real name is visible anywhere, it probably falls into this category.

Keep track going forward

If you want to stay on top of information that pops up about you on social media (or the rest of the web), you can set up a free Google Alert for your name. It’s an easy way to keep tabs on your online reputation.

Here’s how to set up a Google Alert for your name:

  • Visit Google.com/alerts and type what you want Google to alert you about in the search bar.
  • Click Show options to change settings for frequency, sources, language and region. You can also specify how many results you want and where you want them delivered.
  • Click Create Alert to start receiving alerts on yourself or other search topics you’re interested in.

Bonus: What does Google know about me?

And last but not least, let’s take a moment to address data that Google itself keeps on you. By default, Google records every search you enter, your location (if you use Google Maps), video-watching history and searches from YouTube, and much more.

Anyone who knows your Google Account email and digs deep enough can learn plenty about your online activities. If you haven’t visited your Google Account and privacy settings in a while, now’s the time to do it.

Now that you’ve searched for yourself and taken note of content that people can see if they look you up, it’s time to take things a step further and actually remove any data that you don’t want public. Want to know how? Just follow along for part two of our guide to Google-searching yourself.

[Source: This article was published in komando.com By KOMANDO STAFF - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

Searching online has many educational benefits. For instance, one study found students who used advanced online search strategies also had higher grades at university.

But spending more time online does not guarantee better online skills. Instead, a student’s ability to successfully search online increases with guidance and explicit instruction.

Young people tend to assume they are already competent searchers. Their teachers and parents often assume this too. This assumption, and the misguided belief that searching always results in learning, means much classroom practice focuses on searching to learn, rarely on learning to search.

Many teachers don’t explictly teach students how to search online. Instead, students often teach themselves and are reluctant to ask for assistance. This does not result in students obtaining the skills they need.

For six years, I studied how young Australians use search engines. Both school students and home-schoolers (the nation’s fastest-growing educational cohort) showed some traits of online searching that aren’t beneficial. For instance, both groups spent greater time on irrelevant websites than relevant ones and regularly quit searches before finding their desired information.

Here are three things young people should keep in mind to get the full benefits of searching online.

1. Search for more than just isolated facts

Young people should explore, synthesise and question information on the internet, rather than just locating one thing and moving on.

Search engines offer endless educational opportunities but many students typically only search for isolated facts. This means they are no better off than they were 40 years ago with a print encyclopedia.

It’s important for searchers to use different keywords and queries, multiple sites and search tabs (such as news and images).

Part of my (as yet unpublished) PhD research involved observing young people and their parents using a search engine for 20 minutes. In one (typical) observation, a home-school family type “How many endangered Sumatran Tigers are there” into Google. They enter a single website where they read a single sentence.

The parent writes this “answer” down and they begin the next (unrelated) topic – growing seeds.

The student could have learned much more had they also searched for

  • where Sumatra is
  • why the tigers are endangered
  • how people can help them.

I searched Google using the keywords “Sumatran tigers” in quotation marks instead. The returned results offered me the ability to view National Geographic footage of the tigers and to chat live with an expert from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) about them.

Clicking the “news” tab with this same query provided current media stories, including on two tigers coming to an Australian wildlife park and on the effect of palm oil on the species. Small changes to search techniques can make a big difference to the educational benefits made available online.

More can be learnt about Sumatran tigers with better search techniques. Source: Shutterstock

2. Slow down

All too often we presume search can be a fast process. The home-school families in my study spent 90 seconds or less, on average, viewing each website and searched a new topic every four minutes.

Searching so quickly can mean students don’t write effective search queries or get the information they need. They may also not have enough time to consider search results and evaluate websites for accuracy and relevance.

My research confirmed young searchers frequently click on only the most prominent links and first websites returned, possibly trying to save time. This is problematic given the commercial environment where such positions can be bought and given children tend to take the accuracy of everything online for granted.

Fast search is not always problematic. Quickly locating facts means students can spend time on more challenging educational follow-up tasks – like analysing or categorising the facts. But this is only true if they first persist until they find the right information.

3. You’re in charge of the search, not Google

Young searchers frequently rely on search tools like Google’s “Did you mean” function.

While students feel confident as searchers, my PhD research found they were more confident in Google itself. One Year Eight student explained: “I’m used to Google making the changes to look for me”.

Such attitudes can mean students dismiss relevant keywords by automatically agreeing with the (sometimes incorrect) auto-correct or going on irrelevant tangents unknowingly.

Teaching students to choose websites based on domain name extensions can also help ensure they are in charge, not the search engine. The easily purchasable “.com”, for example, denotes a commercial site while information on websites with a “.gov”(government) or “.edu” (education) domain name extension better assure quality information.

Search engines have great potential to provide new educational benefits, but we should be cautious of presuming this potential is actually a guarantee.

[Source: This article was published in studyinternational.com By The Conversation - Uploaded by the Association Member: Bridget Miller]

Categorized in Search Techniques

Search Console Insights uses both Search Console and Google Analytics data in one view

After being under the radar for a couple of months, Google has confirmed the new Google Search Console Insights. Search Console Insights is a new view of your data specifically “tailored for content creators and publishers,” Google said. It can help content creators understand how audiences discover their site’s content and what resonates with their audiences.

Search Console Insights uses both Search Console and Google Analytics data in one view. Google announced the beta today on Twitter, saying, “Today we’re starting to roll out a new experience to beta testers: Search Console Insights. It’s a way to provide content creators with the data they need to make informed decisions and improve their content.”

Access Search Console Insights. If you’re participating in the closed beta, you can access Google Search Console Insights for some of the profiles you manage in Google Search Console at https://search.google.com/search-console/insights/about. There, you can learn more about this reporting tool and click on Open Search Console Insights to potentially access the report.

What it looks like. Here is a screenshot provided by Google:

 

I uploaded a full-sized, but blurred out, screenshot over here.

What Search Console Insights tells you. Google said Search Console Insights can help content creators and publishers answer questions about their site’s content, such as:

  1. What are your best performing pieces of content?
  2. How are your new pieces of content performing?
  3. How do people discover your content across the web?
  4. What are your site’s top and trending queries on Google Search?
  5. What other sites and articles link to your site’s content and did you get any new links?

Can’t access Search Console Insights? If you do not have access to Google Search Console Insights, do not worry. It is still in beta and even though Google has publicly announced it, it is not yet available to everyone.

“It is a closed beta that is currently only available to a group of users that have already received an official email from us for a specific site. We hope to open it for more users and to allow the beta group users to add more sites to it over time — stay tuned for more news and updates about this in the future,” Google said.

Why we care. As we said before, “Having certain Google Analytics data in Search Console can offer a big convenience and also help you see your data in new ways.” This Search Console Insights dashboard gives you more views of your content performance since it now blends both Google Analytics and Google Search Console data into one.

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Mercedes J. Steinman]

Categorized in Search Engine

Having a website has long been thought of as the key to doing business with the world. But most businesses aren’t global – they’re local – so ranking on page one of Google globally isn’t nearly as valuable as having a strong strategy for local search engine optimization (SEO).

Local SEO is a catch-all for various digital practices designed to help your website rank higher in local searches, which increases your chances of being found by internet users more likely to actually patronize your business. Here are a few simple ways to instantly improve your company’s local search visibility:

Google My Business
Google is the search giant, and Google My Business (GMB) is its most powerful local tool. To start, log into (or create) your free Google account, visit GMB, add all of your locations, verify them and share photos. GMB also allows for customer reviews, so ask for them! This will help build your reputation and, in the eyes of Google’s algorithm, your chances of being listed higher in local search results for relevant terms.

Localize Your Website
Simple things like adding your city and state to the title of your website pages can make an impact. Instead of just “Tom’s Flower Shop,” titling your site something like “Tom’s Flower Shop | Florist in Miami, FL” helps search engines locate you. Then, go through your whole site and see where you can add localization language. There are probably dozens of opportunities to mention the city and neighborhoods you serve.

Get into Local Directories
Google actually refers to Yelp and other localized directories to assess how important your business is to the local area. Ask your web firm to research which online business directories are popular with local users and make sure your business info is listed completely and accurately on all of those websites.

Get Local on Social
Creating and maintaining social media pages can help localize your business, but you need to go beyond that and engage locals online. People talk about business, new developments and products on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and more, and these social mentions are picked up by Google. If a lot of people talk about your business and/or link to your website, search engines will assume that you are relevant.

This is just an intro to the practice of local SEO. If you’re struggling to get on people’s radar, get in touch with Brand Poets. We can point you in the right direction.

[Source: This article was published in communitynewspapers.com By Tana Llinas- Uploaded by the Association Member: Anthony Frank]

Categorized in Search Engine

Microsoft Word will have a new search experience offering more tools, such as questions, understanding in-text errors, and synonyms.

Microsoft says it wants users of Microsoft Word to have a more robust search experience when using the Office application. Specifically, a major overhaul of the app’s integrated search tool is in the works. Microsoft plans to draw more parallels with its web search experience.

When people use Microsoft Word in the future, their searchers will be handled more like a typical search performed on a web browser. According to Microsoft, users will be able to surface search results when they make an in-text error, like a typo.

Word will help by searching other related items. This behavior is similar to web search engines and is not currently available on the app. Next, Microsoft Word search will also group together forms of words.

Improving Search

When users input a search term, the app will also find other words related to the search term. Synonyms will allow users to see more results, and it will also work for multi-word searches.

“We’re utilizing well-established web search technologies, such as query and document understanding, and adding deep learning based natural language models. This allows us to handle a much broader set of search queries beyond exact match,” Microsoft says.

Microsoft also wants Word’s upcoming search update to allow users to input questions as search terms.

“With the recent breakthroughs in deep learning techniques, you can now go beyond the common search term-based queries. The result is answers to your questions based on the document content. This opens a whole new way of finding knowledge. When you’re looking at a water quality report, you can answer questions like ‘where does the city water originate from? How to reduce the amount of lead in water?’” Microsoft explains.

At the moment, all the planned changes are named as “coming soon” with no word on a specific launch date.

 [Source: This article was published in winbuzzer.com By Luke Jones - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill] 

Categorized in Internet Search

New data reveals the top searches performed on YouTube this year, along with the most popular channels.

The top 100 YouTube search queries of the year are revealed in a study examining the search volume of over 800 million keywords.

YouTube does not provide this data officially, but Ahrefs compiles a report each year based on data in its Keyword Explorer tool.

Top queries in the report are broken down by searches in the US and searches performed worldwide.

First let’s take a look at top US searches.

Top YouTube Searches in the US

These are the top 20 searches on YouTube in the United States. For a complete list of top 100 queries, see the original report.

Top 20 US Queries (& Search Volume)

  1. pewdiepie (3,770,000)
  2. asmr (3,230,000)
  3. music (2,670,000)
  4. markiplier (2,380,000)
  5. old town road (2,040,000)
  6. pewdiepie vs t series (1,940,000)
  7. billie eilish (1,910,000)
  8. fortnite (1,630,000)
  9. david dobrik (1,610,000)
  10. jacksepticeye (1,580,000)
  11. james charles (1,560,000)
  12. joe rogan (1,560,000)
  13. baby shark (1,500,000)
  14. bts (1,350,000)
  15. dantdm (1,330,000)
  16. snl (1,260,000)
  17. game grumps (1,140,000)
  18. cnn (1,120,000)
  19. wwe (1,100,000)
  20. lofi (1,040,000)

Some observations:
One thing that’s clear when looking at this year’s top searches compared to last year’s is more people are turning to YouTube for music.

Almost a quarter of this year’s top 100 US searches are music related. The keyword “music” itself is the 3rd most searched term even.

Another auditory experience, ASMR, comes in at #2 which is down from last year’s top position.

Five of the top 10 searches are branded, which means people are searching directly for the names of channels and YouTube creators.

In fact, 50% of the top 100 searches are for specific YouTube personalities and channels.

At a glance it would appear gaming queries are still popular, but less so compared to last year.

That could be an indication Twitch is capturing more of the gaming audience.

Let’s see how these searches compare to the top worldwide searches.

Top YouTube Searches Worldwide

These are the top 20 searches on YouTube worldwide. For a complete list of top 100 queries, see the original report.

Top 20 Worldwide Queries (& Search Volume)

  1. bts (17,630,000)
  2. pewdiepie (16,320,000)
  3. asmr (13,910,000)
  4. billie eilish (13,860,000)
  5. baby shark (12,090,000)
  6. badabun (11,330,000)
  7. blackpink (10,390,000)
  8. old town road (10,150,000)
  9. music (9,670,000)
  10. peliculas completas en español (9,050,000)
  11. fortnite (9,010,000)
  12. pewdiepie vs t series (8,720,000)
  13. minecraft (8,560,000)
  14. senorita (8,290,000)
  15. ariana grande (7,890,000)
  16. alan walker (7,560,000)
  17. calma (7,390,000)
  18. tik tok (7,270,000)
  19. musica (7,140,000)
  20. bad bunny (7,040,000)

Some observations:
It appears the whole world is using YouTube more for music, as Ahrefs points out:

“Searches for artists, bands and songs dominate our list of the top 100 worldwide YouTube searches with a staggering 57/100 searches (almost ⅔) being music‐related.

So compared to the US, it seems that the rest of the World uses YouTube far more for music.”

The rest of the world isn’t as into branded content, however, as only two of the top 10 worldwide searches are branded.

Takeaways For Marketers

Perhaps the greatest takeaway for marketers is the insight into what users generally search for on YouTube.

People primarily turn to YouTube search for: music, gaming, branded content, and already-established YouTubers.

That presents a challenge when it comes to building an audience for smaller independent channels.

It’s not impossible though, as there are ways outside of search results to generate traffic to videos.

For instance, YouTube’s suggested videos are instrumental to the success of many channels’ content.

For more on how to success with YouTube’s recommendation algorithm, see these resources:

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Anna K. Sasaki]

Categorized in Internet Search
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