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We all probably did a lot more online shopping this year during the pandemic than ever before. After online shopping, you will notice that pop-up ads are constant, and continue to pop up even if you continue to “x” them out. Or you might check the weather, and find that the site you access knows exactly which town and state you are in.

That’s because of cookies and your browser. Here are some tips to minimize the use of your browsing history by third parties.

First, when you use a computer and Wi-Fi in a public place, your browsing history can be accessed and stored. Even if you are browsing using your own Wi-Fi, you can do it privately. All you have to do is go to the far right side of the browser toolbar, click on the three little dots and select private or incognito.

Next, you can delete your browsing history by going to those same little three dots and clicking on “More Tools;” when the menu comes down, click on “Clear browsing data.”

When visiting websites, be wary of any pop-up that asks you to click on “I agree.” Usually, it is asking you to agree to allow cookies. If it gives you an option to say “no,” say “no.” If a pop-up asks you if you want to delete cookies or “do-not-track,” say “yes.”

To restrict browsers from sending your location-based data, refuse to provide consent if asked when you visit a site.  Depending on the browser you use, you can go into “preference” in settings and choose the option of disallowing or asking for the request of location when you visit a site.

Use other browsers that have advanced privacy settings, such as DuckDuckGo.

To restrict Google from creating an ad profile on you, you may wish to consider downloading Google Analytic Browser Add-on so your tracking activity is restricted.

Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn also track our online activities. To limit these platforms from tracking, go to “Settings” in each site, and click on the choices that allow you to limit targeted ads, tailor ads, or managing advertising preferences.

All websites track users. Controlling cookies and browsing history to limit this tracking will reduce the number of pop-up ads you receive, and the sharing of information about your browsing without your knowledge.

 [Source: This article was published in natlawreview.com  - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dorothy Allen]
Categorized in Internet Privacy

Search is integral to our experience of the internet. It answers our questions, satisfies our curiosities, and with an estimated 4.7 billion people actively using the internet, it’s no coincidence that one of the biggest companies in the world controls search. In fact, Google holds 92% of the global search engine market and derives 57% of its revenue – over $100 billion a year – directly from search advertising. Just the act of trying to improve your search engine ranking page for a particular search term – Search Engine Optimisation – is a multi-billion dollar industry in its own right.

With this in mind, Apple’s recent moves towards establishing its own search technology are hardly unusual, but the real reasons behind it might surprise you – because it’s not about monetization.

Apple’s rival to Google Search

In the latest version of iOS, Apple has begun to show its own web search results. If you have an iPhone, you’ll see them described as “Siri Suggested Websites” when searching from the home screen. It’s been well documented that the AppleBot search crawler is increasingly appearing on weblogs as Apple seeks to index the internet – Apple has a page describing its purpose – and it’s clear that Apple means business when it comes to its own search engine.

But why does Apple feel the need to invest in its own search engine? The status quo is a good deal for Apple – it’s thought that Google currently pays Apple anything between $8 and $12 billion dollars a year in order to be the default search engine on Apple products, and most people are reasonably happy to default to Google. The issue bubbling up is this agreement could be forced to change – not by Apple or Google, but by the US Government.

 

The internet search giant faces an antitrust lawsuit from the US Department of Justice over claims they are fostering a ‘continuous and self-reinforcing cycle of monopolization’. There are clear similarities with the Microsoft Internet Explorer antitrust action of the late ‘90s, and if a similar conclusion is reached, then Apple will be forced to go cap-in-hand to another search engine or reveal its own search engine. Either way, there’s no possibility that Apple will leave its users without the ability to search the internet, it’s too critical to the experience of its products.

What does this mean for enterprise search?

For many years there’s been a gulf between the tools we use as consumers and the tools we use as knowledge workers. It’s often a source of frustration: why is it that at an internet search console, we can find the answer to the most obtuse and bizarre question we can possibly imagine in seconds through a couple of clicks of the mouse, yet it takes me ten minutes to find the document that Jack from Accounts sent me two weeks ago?

The answer lies in the complexity of enterprise search as a function. Behind the veil of the easily accessible user interface, enterprise search is more complex than it appears and there are much greater technological challenges to be overcome, despite the visual similarities with an internet search. For example, content online can easily be categorized by the number of clicks and views a page has received, in order for relevancy to be established, as traffic volumes are incredibly high. However, the document that Jack from Accounts sent is unlikely to have been opened anywhere near as much, so other technologies, such as natural language processing, need to be relied upon in order to understand the content of documents and recommend relevancy.

So, if Apple is spending (most likely) billions of dollars recreating a tool that effortlessly finds us the global sum of human knowledge, then isn’t it about time we improve the tools that knowledge workers have to do their jobs?

Why now for enterprise search?

It’s fair to say Google is doing a good job at keeping up with indexing the internet, but the good news for Google is the internet’s growth of searchable data has slowed significantly since the early 2000s, and it’s currently growing by about 10% a year.

On the other hand, the growth of enterprise data is on another trajectory. According to an IDC whitepaper called “Data Age 2025”, its analysts calculate that enterprise data is growing by around 40% a year, and will account for over 80% of installed bytes by 2025. Under this deluge of data, how will we ever find the document sent to us by Jack from Accounts?

 

The complication is that enterprise data is more heterogeneous in nature than internet data, which is homogeneous by comparison. As a result, enterprise data tends to reside in silos, so if we need to find a document, we can narrow down where we look to a couple of places – for instance, in our email or on a particular SharePoint. However. a further complication arises when we don’t know where to look – or worse still, we don’t know what we’re looking for. A siloed approach works fairly well but at some point, we start to lose track of where to look. According to recent Sinequa research, knowledge workers currently have to access an average of around six different systems when looking for information – that’s potentially six individual searches you need to make to find something.

Compounding the issue, we’re increasingly making use of unstructured or semi-structured data and mining it for information. In these cases we need context; we need metadata. Finding data is getting more complicated.

The issue at hand is time. The same Sinequa research found that, on average, 44 minutes a day is spent searching for information. Just by cutting this in half, we’d get back 11 working days in a year. Better enterprise search tools would enable this, returning more time to employees so they are able to be more productive and deliver value to their organization.

Existential threat, or an opportunity to differentiate?

Whether Apple considers a potential lack of access to internet search an existential threat or simply another opportunity to differentiate its products versus its biggest competitor, it’s clear that Apple sees search as a fundamental part of its offering. That’s why it’s investing vast sums in building its own search engine.

It’s only a matter of time before enterprise search reaches a similar tipping point. There will be a time when the silos become too many or the time is taken to search them becomes too great. The question is whether the reason for enterprise to take search seriously is because a lack of search is seen as an existential threat, or an opportunity to differentiate.

[Source: This article was published in information-age.com By Stéphane Kirchacker - Uploaded by the Association Member: Anthony Frank] 
Categorized in Search Engine

All web browsers include a default search engine and a set of search engines that is supported by default. You search when you type anything in the address bar that is not an address and will always use the default search engine for that.

Browsers include options to change the default search engine so that another one is used whenever you type in the address bar, but what if you want to use different search engines based on your queries? You could open the homepages of non-default search engines and start searches from there, but there is an easier option, and it is included in all Chromium-based web browsers including Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Vivaldi, Opera, or Brave.

All of these browsers support the ancient keywords feature. Basically, what it does is associate a shortcut with a search engine URL to run searches using that shortcut.

Some browsers map single-letter shortcuts to search engines e.g. Vivaldi does that.  Using Vivaldi, you can use the sequence B-Key, then Tab-key, to run searches using Bing, or D-Key then Tab-key, to use DuckDuckGo.

Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Brave support keywords as well, but the companies have set the keywords to the domain name. That's a nuisance, as you need to type Bing.com then Tab-key to run a search from Bing, or ecosia.org then Tab-key to use that search engine.

chrome keywords search

Users who would like to make use of the keywords feature in Chromium-based browsers may run into the following two primary issues:

  1. How to add search engines that are not integrated with the web browser by default.
  2. How to make sure that "sane" keywords are linked to search engines to speed up the process.

Adding search engines to Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers

chrome search engines

Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers pick up search engines automatically. The best option is to visit the search engine's homepage, e.g. Startpage, and run a single search. It should be added to the browser's selection of search engines automatically at that point.

 

Load chrome://settings/search engines (note that the address may be different depending on the browser) to verify that the search engine is available. You may use the search on the page to find a search engine quickly if lots are listed on the page.

To get to the page manually, select Menu > Settings > Manage Search Engines (or Search Engines).

Customizing keyword shortcuts for search engines

edit-search-engine-chrome.png

The browser lists the keywords on the search engine management page. You change them with a click on the three dots that are displayed at the rightmost location of the search engine's line on the page and selecting "Edit" from the menu that opens.

change-keyword.png

You may then change the keyword (and other parameters). The new keyword is displayed directly in the listing, and you may use it directly in the address bar without a restart.

Just type the new keyword followed by a tap on the Tab-key, a search term, and Enter-key to run a search using the associated search engine.

Now You: do you use keywords in your browser? (via Deskmodder)

 [Source: This article was published in ghacks.net By Martin Brinkmann - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila] 
Categorized in Search Engine

The European Union and the United States want to introduce tighter rules for tech giants like Google. Search engine rivals are ready to step up as efforts are made to create a fairer competitive environment.

Is it right that one company should dominate the internet the way Google does? One person who feels things should be different is Gabriel Weinberg, the 41-year-old CEO of DuckDuckGo, a search engine that claims to protect the user's private sphere and not collect huge amounts of personal data like Google.

Under fair conditions, "Google's market share would immediately drop by 20 percentage points," Weinberg told DW. He says that his powerful competitor has, for example, making it unnecessarily difficult to use other search engines on Android smartphones. "In fact, it takes 15 different clicks to make DuckDuckGo the default on Android devices," he says.

Weinberg is of the view that everyone should be able to decide more easily which search engine they use. "We're asking to be on the same level playing field," he says, and not for any special concessions.

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Markus Beckedahl is an internet activist and journalist

For some time now, Weinberg has not been alone with his demands in the US. Politicians are coming over to his side. Criticism of the market power possessed by Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple is no longer muted background noise, but rather a siren of protest. Several US states have sued Google and accused its parent company, Alphabet, of using unfair practices to defend its monopoly on online searches and advertising. Facebook is also facing litigation.

EU plans tough measures

While such legal action has been taken in a somewhat piecemeal fashion in the US, the European Union is planning large-scale measures that will revamp the digital world. The European Commission wants to ensure fair competition with a digital services law and a digital market law. Those who violate the intended legislation could face penalties of up to 6% of their annual global revenue.

 

Partly in view of the severe penalties, internet activist Markus Beckedahl is sure that "the biggest lobbying battle of the digital world" is about to start. Beckedahl has been observing the behavior of tech giants for nearly 20 years at netzpolitik.org. He says that after such a long period of lax regulation, authorities must now set up a regulatory framework that prevents the big corporations "from extending their power further from their dominant market position."

Asymmetries of power

According to the proposal by the European Commission, platforms will no longer be allowed to prioritize their own content and products over those of other providers. They will have to make their advertising and their recommendation algorithms more transparent so that is possible to trace what is shown to whom when. The EU is even considering breaking up corporations if they don't stick to the EU rules.

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The market share of total US digital ad spending

One effective weapon could also be so-called interoperability. This means that big corporations would have to open up their systems. For example, a WhatsApp message could also be sent to Telegram. "This could lead to more competition on the messenger service market," Beckedahl told DW.

Researchers and authorities are also to be given better access to data from Amazon, Google, and Co. "At the moment, there is a huge asymmetry of power. Platforms have all this data; their research departments can access it in real-time, while regulatory authorities stand there helplessly," Beckedahl said.

But the Commission's initiative is coming almost too late. In addition to commanding the search engine market, Google is also the market leader for user-generated videos via YouTube. Amazon is building up its dominance in the cloud sector (AWS — Amazon Web Services) alongside its mail-order business. And Facebook is dominating social networks with its own platform and Instagram, as well as the messenger market with WhatsApp.

Gabriel Weinberg from DuckDuckGo is also watching developments in Europe. His company is one of the founding members of Global Privacy Control, an alliance that works on protecting private data. He has been working on his search engine for almost 13 years and now has 150 people working with him.

He feels the collection of personal data is "at the center of most of the things that are wrong with the internet." Although his search engine also earns money with advertising, the adverts that are shown are based on the search context, not the user profile as with Google, he says. Weinberg believes that this also improves the quality of the search results and that his company wants all results to be the same everywhere in the world and not to be dependent on personal user data.

Weinberg says that his search engine currently receives 2 billion requests per month and is growing fast, but the market share for DuckDuckGo searches is still minuscule compared with its competitors. DuckDuckGo's market share could be more like 10% if it were made easier to make it the default on devices, he says.

From Europe to the US?

Markus Beckedahl from netzpolitik.org says that the US government is still not interested in taking tough action on its tech giants. "Those are the companies they use to dominate the world," he says. However, he feels that stricter regulation in the EU could become a model and increase the calls for comparable measures in the US. He cites the example of the EU's General Data Protection Regulation. "Europe set digital standards here," he says.

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DuckDuckGo's CEO says if his company were to be taken over, it wouldn't be by Google

But he believes that regulation alone will not automatically improve everything — and that consumer action is necessary. "With every click, with every search request, Google gets better," he says.

Weinberg hopes that competition will become fairer. He is already seeing interest in greater protection for the private sphere. And there have even been occasional rumors of takeover bids for his search engine. He declines to comment on them. But he does say that if a takeover did occur, it would certainly not be by Google.

 [Source: This article was published in dw.com By Barry McMahon - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson]
Categorized in Search Engine

Search results can be cluttered with ads and other less-useful information. These add-ons strip out the junk to help you find exactly what you're looking for.

THE WEB IS a big place, which is why we need search engines. But given that virtually every popular search engine now heavily weights its top results in favor of its own products, services, and ads, it's gotten surprisingly difficult to really find the information you're looking for.

Luckily, these browser extensions for Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Mozilla Firefox take your searches to the next level, making them smarter and faster, so you don't have to spend so much time sifting through ads and irrelevant information to find good search results.

From digging deeper into Wikipedia to querying multiple search engines at once, you should be able to find something of use here. Note that the new Microsoft Edge browser is based on Chromium, like Google Chrome is, so you can install any extension from the Chrome Web Store.

Search the Current Site

Full marks to this particular browser add-on for one of the most straightforward and descriptive names we've come across: Search the Current Site does exactly that, running your query of choice on every page across the domain you're currently visiting (such as www.wired.com). While your browser lets you search through the single web page you're currently viewing if you tap Ctrl+F (Windows) or Cmd+F (macOS), this extension is a far more comprehensive and customizable way of getting results from one particular website.
Wikipedia Search

It's likely that a lot of your web searches are going to lead you to Wikipedia anyway, so you can speed up the process by querying the online encyclopedia right from the address bar in Chrome or Edge—just type "wiki" followed by your search keywords. The extension does more than that though, also enabling you to look up terms from inside Wikipedia and on the web at large through the right-click context menu. It works with hundreds of languages that Wikipedia supports and is a must if you spend a lot of time hunting through its pages.

Wolfram|Alpha

Google is fine, up to a point, but Wolfram|Alpha beats it in all kinds of areas—from mathematical equations and algebra to cultural history and entertainment. It does conversions and calculations, physics queries, and data about engineering, and can also dig into information on transportation, the economy, and health. There's plenty more to explore besides everything we've already mentioned, and with this extension set up, you can get at the vast array of features offered by Wolfram|Alpha with a single click.

 

Simple Search

The Simple Search extension offers a reminder of what web searches used to look like: If you run a search using Bing or Google with Simple Search enabled, you'll get a plain and uncluttered list of results, without any of the distractions of ads, info boxes, and sponsored links. The simplified search results appear on top of the standard results, so if you want to see the original page, it's only a click away—otherwise enjoy searching the web the old-fashioned way.

TinEye Reverse Image Search

TinEye is one of those essential resources that should be in the toolkit of every serious web searcher. It scours the internet for pictures, or rather one specific picture that you provide—it can help you spot scams and fakes, work out the origin of an image, direct you towards different sizes of a certain picture, and more. This official TinEye extension makes it easier for you to launch image searches, via a new entry that gets added to the right-click context menu in your browser. Sure, in Chrome you can search for images by right-clicking on them as well, but this gives you another—and sometimes more useful—option.

Search All

Sometimes just one search engine isn't enough—Search All enables you to query Google, Bing, Amazon, Wikipedia, eBay, Twitter, YouTube, and any other search engine or searchable portal you want to add. It's easy to switch between the search options you've configured, and the extension makes it straightforward to focus your searches on shopping sites, image databases, video and movie sites, recipe portals, or whatever else you're particularly interested in. The add-on comes with some useful customizations too.

Multiple Tabs Search

Multiple Tabs Search is a web search extension for power users: Essentially, it lets you run multiple searches at once, together with any necessary parameters you want to add (to limit results to a certain site, for example). It can really speed up your searching if you're got a lot of queries to get through, and you can even remove certain sites (such as YouTube or Facebook) from the list of matches if necessary. The add-on can also be used to open a list of URLs at the same time in successive tabs, making it an even more useful utility.

InvisibleHand

InvisibleHand is a search tool that runs automatically in the background for you, springing into life whenever it finds the product you're currently looking at for a cheaper price somewhere else on the web. It can also load up coupons relevant to the site that you're currently visiting, just in case you can get some money off, and there's also the option to set up price alerts on particular items that you're interested in getting—potentially saving you hours of manually searching the web and clicking around to find the best deals online.

Giphy

Never be stuck for a GIF again by adding the Giphy extension right to your browser toolbar. No matter what the occasion, you can save yourself a substantial amount of searching time by loading up this add-on and typing in some keywords—you can then copy the URL link to your chosen GIF, or drag and drop it straight into the web page you're on (your reactions will never have been so fast). The extension's pop-up window also showcases GIFs that are trending and proving popular, in case you're stuck for some inspiration.

[Source: This article was published in wired.com By DAVID NIELD - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin ]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google Chrome is known to be one of the mobile browsers that are most easily used. There are, however, a variety of elements that cannot be found or used quickly. Google’s web Chrome browser is testing a new feature. Shortly, the search engine giant is creating a Chrome Video Tutorials to help new users familiarise themselves with the app, how-to browser.

 

Google Tests Chrome Browser Video Tutorials for Android Mobile Users

According to a report from PhoneArena, Google Chrome users will watch a video tutorial to understand the browser’s functions. This functionality is designed into the app and is now being tested or stable on the mobile browser that can right now be enabled from the Google Play Store on the Android smartphone. It contains the Chrome Canary application and the Chrome Dev app that allows users to access features the company checks and later arrive on live builds. These guides are for new users who don’t know the app and its features. Chrome Android users will watch a video tutorial explaining the browser features on the app’s home page.

The video tutorial was first noticed through Chrome Story, a platform that tracks the development of Google Chrome. A new flag is found inside the Dev and Canary channels of the Google Chrome Android app in the Chrome Story report. The flag is known as #video tutorials. When the flag is set to ‘Enabled,’ a new card will be shown on a new Chrome tab page for videos below the site shortcuts. The card shows many videos, and tapping any will play the video for users. The option also asks you to use your chosen language before playing a video, as seen in a clip-on Chrome Story. On top of each video, there is also a sharing button that allows users to share videos with just one tap.

The report says that the videos used for Chrome Dev and Canary channels are videos from placeholders from Google, with tutorials on the main screen already accessible. However, titles in the complete list of videos found in Chrome Dev and Canary editions indicate that these videos’ completion includes topics such as “How to use Chrome.”

 [Source: This article was published in phoneworld.com.pk By Sehrish Kayani - Uploaded by the Association Member: Rene Meyer]

Categorized in Search Engine

Bestselling author and cybersecurity awareness specialist.

It's a digital world, and we all love the convenience. But can we honestly say we're being as safe as possible when exploring our favorite websites? Some of you may even be thinking that it's no big deal because you've been using the internet for years to perform data-sensitive tasks, like making purchases or processing digital banking transactions, and you've never had a problem.

But a cybercriminal's goal isn't necessarily to make obvious trouble for you. Rather, they seek to remain undetected for as long as possible, so they can steal as much sensitive data as they can for as long as they can. 

With that in mind, here are 12 tips to help protect yourself, your colleagues and your family while browsing the web.

Automate Processes

• Web browsing is considerably safer when you control pop-up windows. Configure your browser to either block or alert you to pop-ups.

• Turn on auto-updates for your browser, browser plugins and any software that runs in your browser. Doing this is an inexpensive way to add security to your web browsing experience.

• Use browser security add-ons. These applications provide safety ratings for websites and search engine results.

Use Discretion

• Always use a secured website for private information like passwords, email and credit cards. In the web address bar, "http" means a website isn't secured with secure sockets layer (SSL). Look for "https" in the web address, as well as the lock symbol — these are indications the website is secured with SSL.

• Avoid sensational sites. Don't visit sites dedicated to gossip about the latest sensational news stories or celebrities, as they are often riddled with malicious software, often referred to as malware. 

• Watch for search engine warnings. If the search engines show that a site might be malicious, don't go there.

• When something pops up on your screen that you find suspicious, always hit X in the top corner, instead of hitting the cancel or ignore function. The cancel or ignore button of suspicious pop-ups are often used to trick someone into downloading malicious software.

Follow Best Practices

• Cover the webcam on your computer or laptop when not in use. Hackers can turn your webcam on and watch you without your knowledge.

• Use bookmarking. For sites that you visit often, save the web address as a favorite or bookmark. This will lessen the chances of landing on a hacker's lookalike site.

• Don't browse while signed into accounts. Before signing into an account with private information, close all other browser windows and tabs.

• Don't store passwords in your browser or on websites. These places can make your passwords more vulnerable to being stolen.

• Remember, anything connected to the internet, even a smart home device like a refrigerator, can be hacked. Always approach connected devices with security in mind.

The internet is a wonderful source of information. As long as we are careful and follow the tips in this article, we can greatly assist in protecting ourselves, our colleagues and our loved ones.

 

[Source: This article was published in forbes.com By Danny Pehar - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

YouTube shares new details about how its recommendation algorithm

New information about how various factors influence YouTube’s video recommendation algorithm is revealed by members of the team responsible for working on it.

Having only been implemented in 2016, we still have a rudimentary of how YouTube’s machine learning algorithm works.

We know video recommendations are influenced by factors such as clicks, watch time, likes/dislikes, comments, freshness, and upload frequency.

We do not know, for example, whether external traffic has any impact on video recommendations.

It’s also not known whether underperforming videos will affect the likelihood of future videos being recommended.

The impact of other potentially negative factors, such as inactive subscribers or too-frequent uploads, is not known either.

Those are the factors YouTube’s team discusses in a new Q&A video about the recommendation algorithm. Here is a summary of all questions and answers.

Underperforming Videos

If one of my videos under-performs, is that going to hurt my channel? Could a few poor videos pull down better videos in the future?

YouTube doesn’t make assessments about a channel as a whole based on the performance of a few videos.

YouTube only cares about how people are responding to a given video when deciding whether to recommend it to others.

The recommendation algorithm is always going to be “following the audience.”

If a video is attracting an audience then it will show up in users’ recommendations regardless of how the channel’s previous videos performed.

Channels shouldn’t be concerned about some kind of algorithmic demotion based on a dip in viewership.

It’s normal for the performance of videos to fluctuate in terms of views and other metrics. So YouTube is careful not to have all of its recommendations driven by those metrics.

Too Many Uploads Per Day

Is there a point at which the number of videos per day/week on each channel is so high that the algorithm is overwhelmed and videos slip through?

There is no limit to how many videos can be recommended to a given viewer from a channel in a single day.

Channels can upload as much as they want. How many views each video receives comes down to viewer preferences.

YouTube’s recommendation system will continue to recommend videos as long as viewers continue to watch them.

If a channel is uploading more videos than usual, and each video is getting progressively fewer views, that may be a sign the audience is getting burned out.

While there is no limit to how many videos YouTube will recommend from a channel in a single day, there is a limit to how many notifications will be sent out.

YouTube only allows 3 notifications per channel in a 24 hour period.

Inactive Subscribers

My channel has been around for quite a few years and I think I may have lots of inactive subscribers. Should I create a new channel and then re-upload the videos in order to appear more acceptable to the algorithm?

 

Inactive subscribers is not a factor impacting YouTube’s recommendation algorithm.

This goes back to the first question where YouTube says its algorithm follows the audience.

A channel with inactive subscribers can still get its next video shown in the recommendations section if it attracts an audience.

Creating a new channel and re-uploading the same videos will not help with getting those videos shown to more people.

YouTube remembers viewer preferences, so there’s little chance of reaching those inactive subscribers with a new channel.

Creators should only start a new channel if they decide to go in a different direction with their content.

External Traffic

How important is external traffic?

External traffic is definitely a factor that influences YouTube’s recommendation algorithm.

However, its influence only extends so far.

External traffic can help get a video shown in the recommendations section. But once it’s there it has to perform well with viewers.

Long term success of a video depends on how people respond after clicking on it in their recommendations.

I’m getting lots of traffic from external websites which is causing my click-through-rates and average view durations to drop, is this going to hurt my video’s performance?

YouTube says it’s not a problem if average view duration drops when a video receives a significant amount of external traffic.

Apparently it’s common for this to happen, and it has no impact on a video’s long-term success.

Again, YouTube’s algorithm cares more about viewers engage with a video after clicking on it in their recommendations.

The algorithm is not concerned with what viewers do after clicking on a video from an external website or app.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern- Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has been trying to make the search results that people could end up using far more organized for a long time now, and part of this has involved creating headers. This header can help search results into different categories sorted into a wide range of tabs including overview and history, and this can help user get the specific type of information that they might actually have been looking for at that current point in time.

This might also help make these headers seem a bit more prominent rather than just being components of a search card that is shown to you after you have made a particular kind of search all in all. Each header does have a distinct aspect to it when it comes to the specific type of information that it would end up using which means that separating them into unique bubbles might just make it easier for people to realize what these categories are for in the first place. Google is trying to increase engagement in some way, shape or form, and while some may argue that the search engine might be better off pursuing other options other would acknowledge that this is a reasonably effective way to go about things.

[Source: This article was published in digitalinformationworld.com By Zia Muhammad - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]

Categorized in Search Engine

Popular search engines and browsers do a great job at finding and browsing content on the web, but can do a better job at protecting your privacy while doing so.

With your data being the digital currency of our times, websites, advertisers, browsers, and search engines track your behavior on the web to deliver tailored advertising, improve their algorithms, or improve their services.

In this guide, we list the best search engines and browsers to protect your privacy while using the web.

Privacy-focused search engines

Below are the best privacy-focused search engines that do not track your searchers or display advertisements based on your cookies or interests.

DuckDuckGo

The first privacy-focused search engine, and probably the most recognizable, we spotlight is DuckDuckGo.

Founded in 2008, DuckDuckGo is popular among users who are concerned about privacy online, and the privacy-friendly search engine recently said it had seen 2 billion total searches.

DDG

With DuckDuckGo, you can search for your questions and websites online anonymously.

DuckDuckGo does not compile entire profiles of user's search habits and behavior, and it also does not collect personal information.

DuckDuckGo is offered as a search engine option in all popular browsers.

In 2017, Brave added DuckDuckGo as a default search engine option when you use the browser on mobile or desktop. In Brave browser, your search results are powered by DuckDuckGo when you enter the private tabs (incognito).

Last year, Google also added DuckDuckGo to their list of search engines on Android and platforms. With iOS 14, Apple is now also allowing users to use DuckDuckGo as their preferred search engine.

Startpage

Unlike DuckDuckGo, Startpage is not crawling the internet to generate unique results, but instead, it allows users to obtain Google Search results while protecting their data.

Startpage started as a sister company of Ixquick, which was founded in 1998. In 2016, both websites were merged and Startpage owners received a significant investment from Privacy One Group last year.

This search engine also generates its income from advertising, but these ads are anonymously generated solely based on the search term you entered. Your information is not stored online or shared with other companies, such as Google.

StartPage

Startpage also comes with one interesting feature called "Annonymous View" that allows you to view links anonymously.

When you use this feature, Startpage renders the website in its container and the website won't be able to track you because it will see Startpage as the visitor.

Ecosia

The next search engine in our list is Ecosia.

Unlike any other search engines, Ecosia is a CO2-neutral search engine and it uses the revenue generated to plant trees. Ecosia's search results are provided by Bing and enhanced by the company's own algorithms.

Ecosia

Ecosia was first launched on 7 December 2009 and the company has donated most of its profits to plant trees across the world.

Ecosia says they're a privacy-friendly search engine and your searches are encrypted, which means the data is not stored permanently and sold to third-party advertisers.

List of privacy-friendly browsers:

Web browser developers have taken existing browser platforms such as Chrome and Firefox, and modified them to include more privacy-focuses features that protect your data while browsing the web.

Brave Browser

Brave is one of the fastest browser that is solely focused on privacy with features like private browsing, data saver, ad-free experience, bookmarks sync, tracking protections, HTTPs everywhere, and more.

Brave

Memory usage by Brave is far below Google Chrome and the browser is also available for both mobile and desktop.

You can download Brave from here.

Tor Browser

The Tor Browser is another browser that aims to protect your data, including your IP address, as you browse the web.

When browsing the web with Tor, your connections to web sites will be anonymous as your request will be routed through other computers and your real IP address is not shared. 

In addition, Tor bundles comes with the NoScript and HTTPS Everywhere extensions preinstalled, and clears your HTTP cookies on exit, to further protect your privacy.

Tor

firefox focus

Firefox Focus also comes with built-in ad blocker to improve your experience and block all trackers, including those operated by Google and Facebook.

You can download Tor browser from here.

Firefox Focus

Firefox Focus is also a great option if you use Android or iOS.

 

According to Mozilla, Firefox Focus blocks a wide range of online trackers, erases your history, passwords, cookies, and comes with a user-friendly interface.

 [Source: This article was published in bleepingcomputer.com By Mayank Parmar - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]

Categorized in Search Engine
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