fbpx

DuckDuckGo, the privacy-focused search engine, announced that August 2020 ended in over 2 billion total searches via its search platform.

While Google remains the most popular search engine, DuckDuckGo has gained a great deal of traction in recent months as more and more users have begun to value their privacy on the internet.

DuckDuckGo saw over 2 billion searches and 4 million app/extension installations, and the company also said that they have over 65 million active users. DuckDuckGo could shatter its old traffic record if the same growth trend continues.

Screenshot 5

Even though DuckDuckGo is growing rapidly, it still controls less than 2 percent of all search volume in the United States. However, DuckDuckGo's growth trend has continued throughout the year, mainly due to Google and other companies' privacy scandal.

DuckDuckGo1.jpg

On average, DuckDuckGo is getting 65 million+ searches regularly. The number is likely to be more if we add up the searches performed via DuckDuckGo's API, extensions, or apps.

DuckDuckGo search engine is based on Bing, community-developed sites such as Wikipedia, and the company has developed its own crawler to generate its index of search results.

Unlike Google, DuckDuckGo is more privacy-oriented, and they don't track what users are searching for. As a result, DuckDuckGo search results are not as up-to-date as Google or even Bing.

On the other hand, Google has championed web standards, and its search engine allegedly ignores privacy standards and tracks people across its platforms.

If you are serious about privacy, you can give DuckDuckGo a try by visiting their search homepage. You can also use DuckDuckGo by installing its extensions and apps.

[Source: This article was published in bleepingcomputer.com By Mayank Parmar - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

Learn key insights that will help you understand how the algorithms of Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, Twitter, and Facebook work.

Here’s an old question that gets asked every year:

How do social media algorithms work?

But, you can often uncover strategic insights by looking at an old question like this one from a different perspective.

In fact, there’s a term for this effect.

It’s called the “parallax” view.

parallax-view.png

For example, marketers often look for influencers on the social media platforms with the greatest reach.

But, influencers evaluate these same platforms based on their opportunity to grow their audience and make more money.

This explains why The State of Influencer Marketing 2020: Benchmark Report found that the top five social media platforms for influencer marketing are:

  • Instagram (82%).
  • YouTube (41%).
  • TikTok (23%).
  • Twitter (23%).
  • Facebook (5%).

This list made me wonder why marketers focus on the reach of their campaign’s outputs, but influencers are focused on the growth of their program’s outcomes.

Influencers want to learn how the Instagram and YouTube algorithms work, because they want their videos discovered by more people.

And influencers are interested in learning how the TikTok and Twitter algorithms work, because they are thinking about creating content for those platforms.

Facebook’s algorithm, however, doesn’t seem quite as important to today’s influencers – unless Facebook represents a significant opportunity for them to make more money.

There are a lot of strategic insights that marketers can glean from looking at how social media algorithms work from an influencer’s point of view.

How the Instagram Algorithm Works

Back in 2016, Instagram stopped using a reverse-chronological feed.

Since then, the posts in each user’s feed on the platform has been ordered according to the Instagram algorithm’s ranking signals.

According to the Instagram Help Center:

“Instagram’s technology uses different ways, or signals, to determine the order of posts in your feed. These signals are used to help determine how your feed is ordered, and may include:

  • “Likelihood you’ll be interested in the content.
  • “Date the post was shared.
  • “Previous interactions with the person posting.”

This has a profound impact on influencers – as well as the marketers who are trying to identify the right influencers, find the right engagement tactics, and measure the performance of their programs.

Relevance

The first key signal is relevance, not reach.

Is click fraud affecting your PPC campaigns?
Start a free trial now and experience your GoogleAds account in a fraud-free environment.

Why?

Because Instagram users are more likely to be interested in an influencer’s content if it is relevant – if it’s about what interests them.

In other words, if you’re interested in football (a.k.a., soccer), then the likelihood that you’ll be interested in content by Nabaa Al Dabbagh, aka “I Speak Football Only,” is high.

But, far too many marketers are looking for celebrities and mega-influencers who have lots of Instagram followers (a.k.a., reach), instead of looking for macro-, mid-tier, micro-, or nano-influencers who are creating relevant content that their target audience is more likely to find interesting.

i-speak-football-only.png

Recency

The second key signal is recency, or how recently a post has been shared.

This gives an advantage to influencers like Marwan Parham Al Awadhi, a.k.a., “DJ Bliss,” who post frequently.

dj-bliss.png

Unfortunately, far too many marketers are engaging influencers to create a single post during a campaign instead of building a long-term relationship with brand advocates who will generate a series of posts that recommend their brand on an ongoing basis.

Resonance

The third key signal is resonance.

In other words, how engaging are an influencer’s posts?

Do they prompt interactions such as comments, likes, reshares, and views with the influencer’s audience?

And, unfortunately, way too many marketers assume that an influencer’s post that mentions their brand has increased their brand awareness, using bogus metrics like Earned Media Value (EMV).

If they’d read, Why International Search Marketers Should Care About Brand Measurement, then they’d realize there are a variety of legitimate ways to measure the impact of an influencer marketing campaign on:

  • Brand awareness.
  • Brand frequency.
  • Brand familiarity.
  • Brand favorability.
  • Brand emotions.
  • Purchase consideration.
  • Brand preference.
  • Brand demand.

Using this parallax view, it’s easy to see that too many marketers mistakenly think influencer marketing is just like display advertising.

They’re buying posts from influencers the same way they would buy ads from publishers.

So, marketers who only look at an influencer’s reach shouldn’t be shocked, shocked to discover that some influencers are using bad practices such as fake followers, bots, and fraud to inflate their numbers.

If you use a one-dimensional view of an influencer’s influence, then you reap what you sow.

How Does the YouTube Algorithm Work?

Now, I’ve already written several articles on how the YouTube algorithm works, including:

But, these articles were written for marketers, not influencers.

So, what can we learn from looking at YouTube’s algorithm from an influencer’s point of view?

Well, according to YouTube Help:

“The goals of YouTube’s search and discovery system are twofold: to help viewers find the videos they want to watch, and to maximize long-term viewer engagement and satisfaction.”

So, YouTube influencers need to start by creating great content on discoverable topics.

Why?

Well, YouTube is one of the most-used search engines in the world.

People visit the site looking for videos about all sorts of subjects.

These viewers may not necessarily be looking for a specific influencer’s video, but they’ll discover it if it ranks well in YouTube search results or suggested videos.

Learn how to use Google Trends to find out what your audiences is looking for on YouTube.

The default results in Google Trends show “web search” interest in a search term or a topic.

But, if you click on the “web search” tab, the drop-down menu will show you that one of your other options is “YouTube search” interest.

YouTube influencers can then use what they see to inform their content strategies.

For example, you might learn that there was 31% more YouTube search interest worldwide in the topic, beauty, than in the topic, fashion.

fashion-vs-beauty.png

Or you might discover that there was 18 times more YouTube search interest worldwide in the sport, drifting, than in the sport, motorsport.

motorsport-vs-drifting.png

YouTube’s algorithm can’t watch your videos, so you need to optimize your metadata, including your titles, tags, and descriptions.

Unfortunately, most marketers don’t use this approach to find the search terms and topics on YouTube that are relevant for their brand and then identify the influencers who are creating content that ranks well for these keywords and phrases.

Now, getting your YouTube video content discovered is only half the battle.

Influencers also need to build long watch-time sessions for their content by organizing and featuring content on their channel, including using series playlists.

As YouTube Help explains:

“A series playlist allows you to mark your playlist as an official set of videos that should be viewed together. Adding videos to a series playlist allows other videos in the playlist to be featured and recommended when someone is viewing a video in the series. YouTube may use this info to modify how the videos are presented or discovered.”

Fortunately, one of the guest speakers for NMA’s program was Mark Wiens, one of the most famous food vloggers in the world.

His YouTube channel has more than 1.4 billion views and almost 6.7 million subscribers.

Here are examples of the playlists that he had created, including Thai food and travel guides.

mark wien

Now, marketers could also look over the playlists on the YouTube channels of influencers when they’re evaluating which ones are “right” for a campaign.

However, I strongly suspect that this only happens once in a blue moon.

How Does the TikTok Algorithm Work?

The TikTok Newsroom posted How TikTok recommends videos #ForYou just before I was scheduled to talk about this topic.

Hey, sometimes you get lucky.

tiktok.png

Here’s what I learned:

“When you open TikTok and land in your For You feed, you’re presented with a stream of videos curated to your interests, making it easy to find content and creators you love. This feed is powered by a recommendation system that delivers content to each user that is likely to be of interest to that particular user.”

So, how does this platform’s recommendation system work?

According to TikTok:

“Recommendations are based on a number of factors, including things like:

  • “User interactions such as the videos you like or share, accounts you follow, comments you post, and content you create.
  • “Video information, which might include details like captions, sounds, and hashtags.
  • “Device and account settings like your language preference, country setting, and device type. These factors are included to make sure the system is optimized for performance, but they receive lower weight in the recommendation system relative to other data points we measure since users don’t actively express these as preferences.”

The TikTok Newsroom adds:

“All these factors are processed by our recommendation system and weighted based on their value to a user. A strong indicator of interest, such as whether a user finishes watching a longer video from beginning to end, would receive greater weight than a weak indicator, such as whether the video’s viewer and creator are both in the same country. Videos are then ranked to determine the likelihood of a user’s interest in a piece of content, and delivered to each unique For You feed.”

TikTok cautions:

“While a video is likely to receive more views if posted by an account that has more followers, by virtue of that account having built up a larger follower base, neither follower count nor whether the account has had previous high-performing videos are direct factors in the recommendation system.”

It’s worth noting that Oracle has won the bid to acquire TikTok’s U.S. operations after ByteDance rejected a bid by Walmart and Microsoft.

Meanwhile, YouTube released YouTube Shorts, a TikTok-like feature, while Facebook recently launched Instagram Reels, which is basically a TikTok knock-off.

So, it appears that some very big players are convinced that TikTok represents a significant opportunity to make more money, or a competitive threat to the growth of their own social media platforms.

I wish that I could add more, but I’m a stranger here myself.

How Does Twitter’s Algorithm Work?

When Twitter was launched back in 2006, it had a simple timeline structure and tweets were displayed in reverse chronological order from the people you followed.

But, like other social media, Twitter started using an algorithm to show users posts that different factors indicate they’ll like.

The biggest recent change to Twitter’s algorithm took place in 2017.

According to a Twitter blog post by Nicolas Koumchatzky and Anton Andryeyev:

“Right after gathering all Tweets, each is scored by a relevance model. The model’s score predicts how interesting and engaging a Tweet would be specifically to you. A set of highest-scoring Tweets is then shown at the top of your timeline, with the remainder shown directly below.”

Their post added:

“Depending on the number of candidate Tweets we have available for you and the amount of time since your last visit, we may choose to also show you a dedicated “In case you missed it” module. This modules meant to contain only a small handful of the very most relevant Tweets ordered by their relevance score, whereas the ranked timeline contains relevant Tweets ordered by time. The intent is to let you see the best Tweets at a glance first before delving into the lengthier time-ordered sections.”

How Does Facebook’s Algorithm Work?

The biggest recent change to Facebook’s algorithm took place in January 2018.

In a Facebook post, Mark Zuckerberg announced:

“I’m changing the goal I give our product teams from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions.”

He added:

“The first changes you’ll see will be in News Feed, where you can expect to see more from your friends, family and groups. As we roll this out, you’ll see less public content like posts from businesses, brands, and media. And the public content you see more will be held to the same standard — it should encourage meaningful interactions between people.”

That same day, Adam Mosseri, who was then the head of News Feed, also wrote a Facebbok post that said:

“Today we use signals like how many people react to, comment on or share posts to determine how high they appear in News Feed. With this update, we will also prioritize posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people. To do this, we will predict which posts you might want to interact with your friends about, and show these posts higher in feed. These are posts that inspire back-and-forth discussion in the comments and posts that you might want to share and react to – whether that’s a post from a friend seeking advice, a friend asking for recommendations for a trip, or a news article or video prompting lots of discussion.”

He added:

“Because space in News Feed is limited, showing more posts from friends and family and updates that spark conversation means we’ll show less public content, including videos and other posts from publishers or businesses.”

So, it isn’t surprising that influencers got the memo.

Which explains why so few believe Facebook represents a significant opportunity to make more money.

Ironically, it’s unclear that marketers got the memo.

Far too many are still cranking out Facebook posts and videos despite the fact that few people are reacting to, commenting on, or sharing them.

Or, as I wrote in Two Social Media Vanity Metrics You Need to Stop Tracking, marketers should stop tracking Facebook Page Likes and Followers because “you’re lucky if .0035% of your Fans and Followers even sees your post or tweet these days.”

new-media-academy.jpg

The Takeaway

These are just some of the strategic insights that marketers can discover by looking at how social media algorithms work from an influencer’s point of view.

If you’re a marketer, then I suggest you move most of the people and budget that you’ve dedicated to creating branded content on Facebook into influencer marketing on Instagram and YouTube.

As for TikTok and Twitter, wait until after the dust settles later this year.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Greg Jarboe - Uploaded by the Association Member: Corey Parker]

Categorized in Social

Dark Web is that area of the internet that consists of encrypted content and is not indexed by search engines.

About 97% cybersecurity companies had their data exposed on the Dark Web in 2020.

Some data breaches occurred as recent as in end of August, a survey by security firm ImmuniWeb found.

The survey covered 398 cybersecurity companies headquartered across 26 countries including USA, UK, India, Canada and Germany.

Dark Web included both Deep Web and Surface Web in the survey. Dark Web consists of encrypted content that is not indexed by search engines.

More than 160 companies faced incidents as their employees used identical passwords on more than one breached system. Most of the passwords lacked basic security requirements - uppercase, numerical and special characters. Common passwords included ‘password’ and ‘123456’.

Half the exposed data consisted of plaintext credentials like financial and personal information.

US-based security firms showed most number of high-risk data breaches, followed by the UK. High-risk breaches include credentials with sensitive information.

A large number of leaks were silently performed by trusted third parties like suppliers or sub-contractors to the company.

Some stolen credentials came from incidents involving unrelated third parties where victims used work emails to sign into adult websites.

At least 5,121 stolen credentials were found in pornographic and adult-dating websites, ImmuniWeb said.

The report also stated that half the companies did not comply with General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules owing to vulnerable software, lack of strong privacy policy, and missing cookie disclaimers when cookies contain traceable personal information.

More than a fourth of the vulnerabilities remain unpatched to date, the security firm said.

[Source: This article was published in thehindu.com By Sowmya Ramasubramanian - Uploaded by the Association Member: Nevena Gojkovic Turunz]

Categorized in Deep Web

Bug causes search UI to display random Bing results

We’ve known for a while that integrating the web search in the default Windows 10 search experience isn’t necessarily the best way to go, but here’s more evidence in this regard if you still needed it.

Some users are now seeing random web results in the search box whenever they search for a specific keyword. By the looks of things, the displayed Bing results have nothing to do with the keyword that was provided in the search box.

Several Windows 10 users have confirmed in this reddit thread that the bug happens on their devices too, and some say that a simple reboot of the computer fixes the whole thing.

In one case, simply searching for “S” in the Windows 10 search UI indeed provides a link to the Settings app, but the web search returns results that have nothing to with such a term. One of the results is a Wikipedia link for the “W” keyword.

Just disable Bing results

At this point, it’s not exactly clear what’s happening, but if a system reboot doesn’t bring things to normal, you can just disable Bing results from the Windows 10 search experience completely.

To do this, just launch the Registry Editor and look for the following path:

ComputerHKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsExplorer

Just create a new DWORD (if it’s not there already) that is called DisableSearchBoxSuggestions and then set its value to 1. Reboot your computer and the web search results should no longer be offered in the Windows 10 search experience.

The aforementioned bug seems to be happening on all Windows 10 versions, including the May 2020 Update whose rollout is still under way. There’s a chance that the bug is caused by a server problem, as the recent cumulative updates are unlikely to be the ones to blame for the whole thing.

[Source: This article was published in news.softpedia.com By Bogdan Popa - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dorothy Allen]

Categorized in Internet Search

Restricted to our homes for months now, many of us have been putting up with a persistent annoyance: a lousy internet connection.

When we are working, a video call with colleagues becomes pixelated, with delayed audio. When we are relaxing, movies and video games take ages to download. In the worst cases, the connection drops altogether.

As people have hunkered down to contain the spread of the coronavirus, average internet speeds all over the world have slowed. Some broadband providers are feeling crushed by the heavy traffic. And dated internet equipment can create a bottleneck for our speeds.

Even the most tech savvy are affected. Keerti Melkote, the founder of Aruba Networks, a division of Hewlett Packard Enterprise that offers Wi-Fi products for businesses, said that in recent weeks, his DSL service from AT&T had dropped periodically. He waited several days for a technician to arrive and is now contemplating subscribing to Comcast for a second internet connection.

“I had three or four days of calls, and I had to go find a particular spot in my house where I had better coverage,” Mr. Melkote said.

At the beginning of the pandemic, my internet also became unbearably slow and suffered several outages. So I asked experts to explain what’s causing our internet problems — and the different remedies.

What’s causing your slow speeds — your internet provider or your equipment at home? Here’s a method to figuring that out.

  • Download an internet speed test app on your phone, like Speedtest by Ookla (free for iPhones and Android phones). 
  • Stand near your router and use the app to run a speed test.
  • Move to a room farther away from the router and run the speed test again.
  • Compare the results.

Less than 15 megabits a second is pretty slow. Speeds of about 25 megabits a second are sufficient for streaming high-definition video; more than 40 megabits a second is ideal for streaming lots of video and playing video games.

If the speed test results were fast near your Wi-Fi router but slow farther away, the problem is probably your router, said Sanjay Noronha, the product lead of Google’s Nest Wifi internet router. If speeds were slow in both test locations, the issue is probably your internet provider.

If you have pinpointed that the problem is your router, the bad news is that you may have to buy new equipment. The good news is that there are many approaches to improving your Wi-Fi connection.

Start by asking yourself these questions:

  • How old is my router? If it’s more than five years old, you should definitely replace it. In 2015, the Federal Communications Commission removed restrictions that had limited the wireless transmission power of Wi-Fi routers, allowing new routers to be 20 times more powerful than they were before. Upgrading to a newer router will probably be one of your most life-changing tech purchases.
  • Where is my router placed? Ideally, your router should be in a central location in your home so that the signal covers as many rooms as possible. In addition, your router should be out in the open, like on top of a shelf, not hidden inside cabinets or under a desk, to beam a clear signal. You should also avoid placing the router near objects and materials that cause interference, like large fish tanks and metal.
  • How big is my home? If you have a home with multiple stories and lots of rooms, and your Wi-Fi is weak in some areas, the best solution is to buy a so-called mesh network system. It’s a system of multiple Wi-Fi access points, including a main router and satellite hubs, that lets you connect multiple wireless access points together to blanket your home with a strong internet connection.
  • My favorite mesh systems are Google Wifi and Amazon’s Eero, which start at $99 for a single router and can be bundled with additional access points. In general, I recommend mesh systems even for smaller homes, because they are fast and very easy to install.
  • Are my other devices slowing down my connection? Gadgets with slower internet technology can slow down speeds for all your other devices.
  • For example, the iPhone 5 from 2012 uses an older-generation Wi-Fi standard. Newer iPhones, from 2014 and later, use a faster wireless standard.
  • Let’s say you own a new iPhone and your teenager owns the iPhone 5. If your teenager begins downloading a video on the iPhone 5 and then you start downloading something on your iPhone, the older phone will take longer to finish before the signal frees up for your phone to download at maximum speed.
  • As a remedy, many modern Wi-Fi routers offer settings that can give specific devices a priority for faster speeds. Consult your router’s instruction manual for the steps. In this hypothetical example, you would want to give your new iPhone top priority and move your teenager’s old iPhone to the bottom.
  • Are my neighbors slowing down my connection? In apartment buildings crowded with gadgets, the devices’ signals are fighting for room on the same radio channels. You can see what radio channels your neighbors’ devices are using with scanning apps like WiFi Analyzer. Then consult your router’s instruction manual for steps on picking a clearer radio channel.

This step is tedious, and many modern routers automatically choose the clearest radio channel for you. In general, replacing an outdated router is the most practical solution.

If you have determined that your internet provider’s service is the root of the issue, your only option is to call your internet service provider and ask for help.

When you call, ask a support agent these questions:

  • Why are my speeds slow? Occasionally a support agent can analyze your internet performance and make changes to speed up your connection. This rarely happens, and more often a technician will need to pay a visit. 
  • Does my modem need to be replaced? The modem, which is the box that connects your home to the internet provider’s service, also can become outdated and occasionally needs to be replaced. If the support agent confirms the modem is old, you can schedule an appointment for a technician to install a new one.
  • Or you can buy your own modem and call the internet provider to activate it. Wirecutter, our sister publication that tests products, recommends modems from Motorola and Netgear, which cost about $80 to $90.
  • Can I buy faster speeds? Your provider may offer packages with more bandwidth meant for higher-quality video streaming and faster downloads. Ask about your options.

As a last resort, you can turn to backups. Many modern phones come with a hot spot feature, which turns the device’s cellular connection into a miniature Wi-Fi network. (Apple and Google list steps on their websites on how to use the hot spot feature on iPhones and Androids.)

Whatever you do, be patient. In these trying times, everything takes longer.

As for me, I confirmed my slow speeds were related to my internet provider, Monkeybrains. I called to report the issue, and after more than a month, a technician replaced the antenna on our roof. Now my speeds are even faster than before the pandemic, so it was well worth the wait.

[Source: This article was published in nytimes.com By Brian X. Chen - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jennifer Levin]

Categorized in Internet Technology

Mozilla Firefox commonly called Firefox is free to use web-browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation along with its subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. The web browser remembers all the pages you have visited, files you have downloaded and more. This information is known as the history of the Mozilla Firefox browser.

You can choose to delete this history in order to not let the browser remember all your search details.

Deleting history will delete:

  • Browsing & download history: Browsing history consists of the list of websites that you have visited which is visible in the History menu, the Library window's history list and the address bar autocomplete list. And the download history contains the list of files that have been downloaded, which is shown in the download window.
  • Form & search history: Form history contains the items you have entered into web page forms for ‘form autocomplete’. Search history consists of items that have been entered into the search field on the new tab page or into the search bar of Firefox.
  • Cookies: It stores information about websites that you visited, such as site preferences or login status. This has information and site preferences stored by the Adobe Flash plugin.

Here is the step-by-step guide to delete the history.

How to clear my history?

Step 1: Open the Mozilla Firefox browser.

Step 2: Then, click on the three horizontal lines at top-right.

Step 3: Then tap on the ‘library’ option on the menu.

Step 3: Go to ‘history’ and choose ‘clear recent history’.

In order to select the timeline of history you want to clear:

Step 4: Click on the ‘ok’ button.

Now, the window will get closed and the selected items will be deleted from your history.

How to make Firefox clear history automatically?

You can switch on the automatic settings to clear the search history every time on exit.

Step 1: Open the Mozilla Firefox browser.

Step 2: Then, click on the three horizontal lines at top-right.

Step 3: Select ‘preferences’ on the menu.

Step 4: Then, choose the ‘Privacy & security panel’.

Step 5: Go to the ‘history’ section.

Step 6: Now, choose ‘use custom settings for history’.

In the drop-down menu next to ‘Firefox will’,

  • Check the box for ‘clear history when Firefox closes’.
  • In order to clear a specific type of history, click the ‘settings’ button next to ‘clear history when Firefox closes’.
  • In the ‘settings for clearing history’ window, check the items you wish to get deleted automatically each time.

Step 7: Once, you have made a selection, click ‘ok’ to close the ‘settings for clearing history’ window.

Step 8: Now, close the about: preferences page.

Any changes you have made will be saved automatically.

Note: In certain circumstances, the performed function will not be successful:

  • Firefox did not shut down normally. If Firefox gets crashed, you will need to restart Firefox and exit/quit normally to make sure that this function runs successfully.
  • Firefox is set to use automatic private browsing. History stored from normal sessions can be deleted from a regular window only.

Clear cookies and data for a specific website

How to remove a single website from your history?

Step 1: Open the Mozilla Firefox browser.

Step 2: Now, click the ‘library’ button at the top-right on your toolbar.

In case you cannot find the button, then click the ‘menu’ button (three horizontal lines at top-right) and then click the ‘library’.

Step 3: Go to ‘history’.

Step 4: Then, click the ‘show all history’ tab at the bottom to open the library window.

Step 5: Now, look for the website you wish to delete from your history by entering the name of the website in the ‘search history’ area in the top-right corner.

Step 6: Then click ‘return’.

Step 7: Now, in the search results, hold down the 'Ctrl' key while you select the site you wish to delete.

Step 8: Then, choose ‘forget about this site’.

Please note that all history items (browsing and download history, cookies, cache, active logins, passwords, saved form data, exceptions for cookies, images, pop-ups) for that site will be deleted

Step 9: Finally, close the library window.

(Source: Mozilla Firefox help)

[Source: This article was published in indiatoday.i  - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google accounts for nearly 96% of the market share of serps globally, in line with Statista. They’re adopted by far, Bing (2.7%) and Yahoo! (1.14%). Though they’re complicated serps, a few of their strategies are related to people who Archie started utilizing 30 years in the past, which is taken into account the primary search engine on the Web. It was developed even earlier than the World Broad Internet existed and was supposed to find information saved on FTP (file switch protocol) servers.

“Archie’s principal distinction with different serps like Google or Yahoo! is that it was not an online search engine. It was a search engine for FTP servers, that’s, servers the place there have been information ”, explains Fernando Suárez, president of the Council of Official Colleges of Computer Engineering (CCII). Its creation was some of the excellent advances within the subject of computing in 2020. That is the way it considers it the School of Computer Engineering of the University of Oviedo, which explains that earlier than 1990 customers may solely entry the net utilizing the FTP protocols: “This made searching extraordinarily difficult as we perceive it at the moment, since to entry a website you needed to know the server on which it was positioned ”.

Due to this fact, in line with Suárez recollects, till then it was “virtually unimaginable” to find a file if one didn’t know precisely the place it was. Archie, which allowed information to be discovered by identify, was used primarily “in universities and academia.” The fundamental operation was just like that of the various search engines which might be used at the moment, however not an identical: “It’s not in regards to the titles of FTP information, however in regards to the world Broad Internet. Now the various search engines undergo all of the webs in quest of content material, not solely in search of the identify of the web page ”.

Behind this search engine, was Alan Emtage. He’s a founding member of the Web Society, is a part of the Internet Hall of Fame and is a associate in a New York-based internet improvement firm known as Mediapolis. Again then, about 30 years in the past, I used to be a younger man from Barbados finding out Laptop Science on the McGill University in Montreal (Canada). Whereas finding out, he created Archie, whose identify derives from the phrase archive. It consisted of a set of packages that searched the repositories of software program of the Web and created a sort of index of the obtainable software program. That’s, a database through which the identify of a file might be positioned.

Emtage wasn’t the one particular person engaged on an Web search engine within the late Eighties, however Archie was the primary to be publicly distributed, in line with McGill College. And it laid the inspiration for future seekers. “Archie developed the rules on which these serps work, that are principally going out, retrieving data, indexing it and permitting folks to go looking,” explains Emtage within the Web of the College.

Suárez says that entry to the Web at the moment was very restricted. However, amongst those that may entry, it signifies that it was widespread to make use of Archie. He himself used it when he was finding out Laptop Engineering at college to seek out information with data on the right way to apply for internships or work. “It was attainable to do international searches however all you discovered was textual content, there weren’t the graphical environments that we’ve got at the moment and lots of instances you downloaded paperwork that weren’t what you needed,” he provides.

The altruistic web

On the time, in line with the engineer, Archie was “an ideal revolution.” “One thing nearly science fiction. Looking for documentation virtually on a common stage was like magic, “he says. However later “it stopped making sense when the net appeared and there started to be different kinds of serps.” Each the Web and serps have modified since then. Emtage is anxious about privateness points and the rise in customized searches with which corporations try to interpret what a person may need. “Google can take away complete elements of the search area that it might suppose you do not need to see, however [esas partes] They may comprise beneficial data that you just won’t be able to acquire now. And they’ll do it with out your data ”, explains the creator of Archie.

However there are some points of the Web and serps that you just do like, and a few of them nonetheless stay. Emtage, in a speech he gave in 2017 Upon becoming a member of the Web Corridor of Fame, he underscored that a part of the spirit of altruism that was outstanding 30 years in the past nonetheless exists. “The Web as we all know it at the moment wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for the truth that most of the organizations and individuals who labored on it at the moment freely allowed the fruit of their work to be distributed without spending a dime,” he mentioned. And he careworn that at the moment there may be nonetheless a lot of the Web that runs on open supply software program to which programmers and engineers from everywhere in the world freely contribute.

As well as, he recalled a dialog about 30 years in the past with engineer Vinton Cerf, thought of one of many fathers of the Web: “He jokingly mentioned to me: Why do not you patent the strategies you might be utilizing in Archie for the search engine? We thought of it fastidiously and got here to the conclusion that if we did, we’d prohibit folks’s capability to make use of what we had created and increase it. “

[Source: This article was published in pledgetimes.com By Bhavi Mandalia - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

The Covid-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for change in the modern workplace. According to 451 Research, Facebook, both of which announced permanent work-from-home policies shortly after work-from-home and shelter-in-place orders were issued by California Governor Gavin Newsom.

Both companies have said that their specific policies are evolving as they figure out the technology and administrative challenges, as well as the regulatory issues that may come into play for things like taxation and cross-border data movement. But the message is clear: We have entered a new era. It is now incumbent on business leaders to figure out what managing a remote workforce means for their organizations and to take appropriate action.

From a cybersecurity perspective, I see plenty of challenges ahead as operations shift from protecting assets that are mostly behind the firewall to one focused on keeping pace with and securing assets in a predominantly decentralized, heterogeneous IT environment. Changing posture from a network security strategy to an end-point security strategy is a fundamentally different approach to securing an enterprise with a majority work-from-home employee base. But it is a necessary one. There will be no shortage of data breaches in the months ahead because of the increase in organizations rushing to accommodate the work-from-home model without establishing that end-point strategy.

Then there is the matter of scale. Prior to the pandemic, allowing people to work remotely was more of an accommodation for a small number of employees whose roles necessitated them to be on the road or to provide a convenient means of being productive for others when circumstances kept them out of the office. Now, with the in-home office a permanent fixture for a majority of employees, it’s worth considering what it means when people who used to work behind the safety of your firewall are now well beyond your network’s perimeter, increasing the size and complexity of the environment you now need to protect.

A recent study found that the average U.S. household owns more than 10 internet-connected devices, typically using a shared network. That means for every employee you have who is now remote, you not only have to worry about the security of company-issued or sanctioned devices and VPNs, but also personal devices (e.g., computers, smartphones and mobile devices, gaming consoles, smart speakers, security cameras, exercise equipment, wearable devices, etc.), and a consumer-grade router, beyond the reach of your security program. Compromised, any one of them can be a vector for attack.

All of these devices and scenarios present a different challenge for maintaining a secure IT environment for as many in-home offices as your organization now finds itself supporting. Unlike traditional approaches to security, the bring-your-own-device ethic means a further loss of control as the ability for IT to image and manage the lifecycle maintenance of all the devices now being used to access the network will be greatly diminished.

What will not work from a security perspective is to allow the work-from-home model to create chaos for IT management and security. If your organization has decided to embrace work from home, it must own that decision and establish rigorous policies and processes to make sure each new satellite of the organization doesn’t disproportionately increase the risk to network and data security. That new program should be built on three pillars:

  • Rigorous authentication of all users and devices accessing the network;
  • Zero-trust posture that assumes nothing is safe until verified; 
  • Pervasive monitoring of all activity in your environment to detect threats and anomalies.

The U.S. Army recently announced a project intended to give some members of its intelligence community the ability to work remotely and still have access to the classified information needed to do their jobs. In announcing the project, the Army’s chief information officer, Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford said, “It’s our job to decide how we’re going to enable them and, more importantly, how we’re going to secure it.”

That’s an important message to send to the organization. The challenges inherent with remaining productive while untethered from a traditional office setting are enough of a concern for employees who find themselves adjusting to working from home. Even though the organization must train each employee in operational security and awareness, any expectation that they must take primary responsibility for the technical security of their home office is unrealistic. 

Instead, it is incumbent on an organization’s IT security team to undertake an objective inventory of the implications of work from home, asking questions such as:

  • How many people will be working from home? Where will they be located? What can they tell you about their environment?
  • What is their job description, and what does that mean for the type of information and bandwidth they’ll need? What regulations will come into play?
  • Will the organization need to supply them with an industrial-grade router and other networking gear? Which employees and partners will they need to connect with?
  • How much control over the employees’ home environment will IT need to request, and how must the organization adapt to these needs in order to scale its security program without burdening employees?

Owning the decision to join the work-from-home movement is not without its costs, and so there is one more question you need to ask yourself: How much do you value the security of your data, systems and devices that are now a part of your network?

There is always a price associated with security, and depending on the size of your organization and the type of data you have to manage, that price may be significant.

[Source: This article was published in forbes.com By Itzik Kotler - Uploaded by the Association Member: Martin Grossner] 

Categorized in Work from Home

Searching online has many educational benefits. For instance, one study found students who used advanced online search strategies also had higher grades at university.

But spending more time online does not guarantee better online skills. Instead, a student’s ability to successfully search online increases with guidance and explicit instruction.

Young people tend to assume they are already competent searchers. Their teachers and parents often assume this too. This assumption, and the misguided belief that searching always results in learning, means much classroom practice focuses on searching to learn, rarely on learning to search.

Many teachers don’t explictly teach students how to search online. Instead, students often teach themselves and are reluctant to ask for assistance. This does not result in students obtaining the skills they need.

For six years, I studied how young Australians use search engines. Both school students and home-schoolers (the nation’s fastest growing educational cohort) showed some traits of online searching that aren’t beneficial. For instance, both groups spent greater time on irrelevant websites than relevant ones and regularly quit searches before finding their desired information.

Here are three things young people should keep in mind to get the full benefits of searching online.

1. Search for more than just isolated facts

Young people should explore, synthesise and question information on the internet, rather than just locating one thing and moving on.

Search engines offer endless educational opportunities but many students typically only search for isolated facts. This means they are no better off than they were 40 years ago with a print encyclopedia.

It’s important for searchers to use different keywords and queries, multiple sites and search tabs (such as news and images).

Part of my (as yet unpublished) PhD research involved observing young people and their parents using a search engine for 20 minutes. In one (typical) observation, a home-school family type “How many endangered Sumatran Tigers are there” into Google. They enter a single website where they read a single sentence.

The parent writes this “answer” down and they begin the next (unrelated) topic – growing seeds.

The student could have learnt much more had they also searched for

  • where Sumatra is
  • why the tigers are endangered
  • how people can help them.

I searched Google using the key words “Sumatran tigers” in quotation marks instead. The returned results offered me the ability to view National Geographic footage of the tigers and to chat live with an expert from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) about them.

Clicking the “news” tab with this same query provided current media stories, including on two tigers coming to an Australian wildlife park and on the effect of palm oil on the species. Small changes to search techniques can make a big difference to the educational benefits made available online.

2. Slow down

All too often we presume search can be a fast process. The home-school families in my study spent 90 seconds or less, on average, viewing each website and searched a new topic every four minutes.

Searching so quickly can mean students don’t write effective search queries or get the information they need. They may also not have enough time to consider search results and evaluate websites for accuracy and relevance.

My research confirmed young searchers frequently click on only the most prominent links and first websites returned, possibly trying to save time. This is problematic given the commercial environment where such positions can be bought and given children tend to take the accuracy of everything online for granted.

Fast search is not always problematic. Quickly locating facts means students can spend time on more challenging educational follow-up tasks – like analysing or categorising the facts. But this is only true if they first persist until they find the right information.

3. You’re in charge of the search, not Google

Young searchers frequently rely on search tools like Google’s “Did you mean” function.

While students feel confident as searchers, my PhD research found they were more confident in Google itself. One year eight student explained: “I’m used to Google making the changes to look for me”.

Such attitudes can mean students dismiss relevant keywords by automatically agreeing with the (sometimes incorrect) auto-correct or going on irrelevant tangents unknowingly.

Teaching students to choose websites based on domain name extensions can also help ensure they are in charge, not the search engine. The easily purchasable “.com”, for example, denotes a commercial site while information on websites with a “.gov”(government) or “.edu” (education) domain name extension better assure quality information.

Search engines have great potential to provide new educational benefits, but we should be cautious of presuming this potential is actually a guarantee.

[Source: This article was published in theconversation.com By Misha Ketchell - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

Categorized in Internet Search
Although both the deep web and dark web are the hidden sections of the internet, they are not synonymous and should not be confused with each other

The terms ‘dark web’ and ‘deep web’ are often interchangeably used to describe the section of the internet that is home to criminal activities. To understand the difference between the dark web and the deep web, we must understand the different layers of the internet, as detailed below.

Surface web: The first layer of the World Wide Web is the surface web, which is also known as the visible web or the clear web. It comprises websites that are indexed by common search engines such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and so on. These websites are available for public access without requiring permissions. It is believed that the surface web constitutes only 3-4% of the entire World Wide Web; however, according to Wikipedia, the figure stands at 10%. This means the millions of search results conducted every second are but a minuscule percentage of the overall internet!

Deep web: A step further below the surface web is the deep web. The deep web is estimated to be nearly 500 times the size of the surface web or 90% of the entire internet. This section of the internet comprises websites and data that are not indexed. They are protected from search engines and crawlers by way of encryption.

Any data behind a firewall, be it data servers, organizational intranets, or archives, belong to the deep web. A website in the deep web would require you to enter your unique username and password combination to access. Probably, the simplest examples of a website in the deep web can be web-based email, social media platform, online banking, or web-based subscription service. That brings us to the question – whether the deep web is illegal to foray into? The answer is No.

Dark web: The deepest layer of the World Wide Web is called the dark web. Although a part of the deep web, dark web goes further deep. It is a subset of the deep web and the key difference between the two is that the deep web can be home to both good and bad data, whereas the dark web is mostly illicit.

As per some estimates, the dark web probably constitutes only 0.1% of the entire internet but is the hotbed for many illegal activities. The dark web can be termed the underbelly of the internet, as it facilitates crimes such as sale/purchase of stolen data, fake identity proofs, porn, drug trafficking, contract killers, sale of arms and ammunition, and so forth.

It is the infamous part of the internet where data is intentionally hidden and criminal activities are rampant. It requires special software – such as The Onion Browser (Tor), Freenet, or I2P (Invisible Internet Project) – to access the dark web. This is because the dark web can be accessed only by anonymous users, which common browsers do not allow. Common browsers track the IP address of the users and hence enable identification of the user – something which is undesirable in the dark web.

Access to the dark web is not illegal but is fraught with numerous risks. Therefore, it is recommended to stay away from the dark web, as it can be highly dangerous.

[Source: This article was published in dqindia.com By Neetu Katyal - Uploaded by the Association Member: Deborah Tannen]

Categorized in Deep Web

AOFIRS

World's leading professional association of Internet Research Specialists - We deliver Knowledge, Education, Training, and Certification in the field of Professional Online Research. The AOFIRS is considered a major contributor in improving Web Search Skills and recognizes Online Research work as a full-time occupation for those that use the Internet as their primary source of information.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.