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Most of us use Google every day, but many have likely only scratched the surface of the search engine's power. Here's how to get better results from a Google search.

A product so ubiquitous that it spawned its own verb. Google accounts for 86 percent of the world's web searches, and thanks to the proliferation of smartphones, anyone can search for anything from anywhere—all you need is an internet connection. That means Google serves several billion searches a day.

It's easy to take for granted what a modern web search can do for you, but it's truly amazing how seamless Google has made the internet. Google can tell you the weather, translate languages, define words, give you directions, and do so much more. When was the last time you argued with friends over something and didn't check Google for the answer? 

23 Google Search Tips You'll Want to Learn

Even if you use Google multiple times a day, there's probably a lot you don't know about the search engine. If you've ever struggled to get the results you want, or just want to know a few inside tricks, the tips below will improve your Googling skills.

Google's search algorithm is remarkably adept at returning the information you are looking for—even when you aren't exactly sure yourself. But for those times when Google doesn't seem to be giving you exactly what you need, there are a few ways you can refine your search results.

Exclude terms with a minus (-) symbol: Want to exclude certain terms from your search results? Use the minus symbol to exclude all the terms you don't want, e.g. best apps -android for results that omit roundups of top Android apps.

Use quotations to search for the exact order: If you search for Patrick Stewart young, you will get results that have all those words, but not necessarily in the order you search. By adding quotations and searching "Patrick Stewart young" you will get only results that include all those words in that order.

Find one result or the other: If you're looking for results that are about one topic or another, but nothing else, use the OR modifier to get more accurate results. For example, searching apple microsoft will surface results relating to either term, but searching "apple OR microsoft" provides you with separate links about Apple and links about Microsoft.

Search operators change where Google searches. Instead of crawling the web at large, you'll find results from specific websites, web headings, and file types.

Search titles only: Use the search intitle: to look for words in the webpage title. For example Microsoft Bing intitle:bad will only return results about Microsoft Bing that have "bad" in the title. Conversely, allintitle: will only return links with multiple words in the title, i.e. allintitle: Google is faster than Bing.

Search File Types: If you're looking for a specific kind of file on the internet, use filetype: to search only for uploaded files that match your query. For example, use filetype:pdf to find a PDF or filetype:doc to locate a Microsoft Office document. You can find a comprehensive list of (occasionally obscure) searchable file types here.

For a comprehensive set of search modifiers and qualifiers, check out this guide.

Learn Google's Search Operators

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Search operators change where Google searches. Instead of crawling the web at large, you'll find results from specific websites, web headings, and file types.

A single website: If you want results from one specific website, use site: followed directly by the site URL you wish to use. You must include the site's domain, e.g. Google Photos tips site:pcmag.com, and not Google Photos tips site:pcmag.

Search titles only: Use the search intitle: to look for words in the webpage title. For example Microsoft Bing intitle:bad will only return results about Microsoft Bing that have "bad" in the title. Conversely, allintitle: will only return links with multiple words in the title, i.e. allintitle: Google is faster than Bing.

Search text only: intext: or allintext: allows you to only search in the text of a site, as opposed to the title and URL, which the search algorithm usually takes into consideration.

Search File Types: If you're looking for a specific kind of file on the internet, use filetype: to search only for uploaded files that match your query. For example, use filetype:pdf to find a PDF or filetype:doc to locate a Microsoft Office document. You can find a comprehensive list of (occasionally obscure) searchable file types here.

Search Related Websites: Search for similar websites by using the related: qualifier to show related results. Searching related:amazon.com brings up results including Walmart and Overstock. Searching related:google.com shows Yahoo and Bing. 

For a comprehensive set of search modifiers and qualifiers, check out this guide.

Set Google Search Result Time Restraints

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Looking for only the latest news about a subject or trying to find information relevant to a specific time frame? Use Google's search tools on desktop and mobile to filter your search results. After you conduct a search, click Tools on the top right and select Any time to open a drop-down menu to narrow results to hours, week, months, or a custom date range.

Perform an Advanced Google Image Search

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Google supports "backward" image searches on most browsers. This function allows you to upload an image file and find information on that image. For example, if you uploaded a picture of the Eiffel Tower, Google will recognize it and give you information on the Paris monument. It also works with faces, and can direct you to websites where the image appears, identify a work of art, or show you images that are "visually similar." 

Go to Google Images, where you can drag and drop an image into the image search bar, or click the camera icon to upload an image or enter an image's URL. (Here's how to do a reverse image search on your phone.)

Do Math in Your Google Search Box

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Whether you want to figure out a tip on a meal, or create a complex geographical rendering, Google search has you covered.

You can do basic calculations directly in the search bar. For example, searching 34+7 will prompt a calculator below the bar with the correct answer already filled in. You can also search 3 times 7 or 20% of $67.42 and receive the answer.

Super math nerds can create interactive 3D virtual objects (on desktop browsers that support WebGL) by plugging in an equation that uses "x" and "y" as free variables. Or plug in different numbers along with some cos(x)s, sin(y)s, and tan(x)s and see what renders.

If these more advanced math functions are something you can use for your everyday activities, Google has an in-depth, mathlete-level explainer here.

Use Google Search as a Converter

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Google will help you convert just about anything. You can search 38 Celsius in Fahrenheit, 10 ounces in pounds, and even 17.5 millimeters in light years. Not only will Google provide you with the answer, it will also provide an interactive conversion calculator for further converting.

Additionally, you can find up-to-date currency conversion rates with just a few keystrokes without needing to know the official currency symbol ($, €, etc.) or ISO designator (i.e. USD for the US dollar or GBP for the British pound). Google's algorithm is able to discern sentence-style queries to provide an answer, interactive chart, and a calculator for further conversions. 

For example, a search for 38 dollars in Iceland returns the answer that (as of Sept. 11, 2020) $38 was equal to 5,176.36 Icelandic króna. You can even search 1 bitcoin in dollars to find out it is worth $10,312.20.

Define Words in Google Search

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Ask Google search to define unfamiliar words (or two-word phrases) just by typing the word and define/definition. This will prompt Google to return a card with the definition, pronunciation, and—when available—a detailed etymology. Sometimes Google will define the word inside the autocomplete box before you press Search.

Track Packages in Google Search

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Google Voice Search

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To search by voice in your desktop browser, click the little microphone in the search box. This feature works much better on mobile devices, where the "OK, Google" trigger is more intuitive. If you ask basic questions, Google Assistant will even answer for you. This function is only supported in the Chrome browser at this time.

Search for the Time

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Calculating time difference is hard, so why not let Google do the work for you? Type time [any location], which could be the name of a country, city or (if it's in the US) a ZIP code, to return a card with the up-to-date local time of your search. It beats having to manually figure out how many hours ahead or behind you are.

Search for Sunrise and Sunset

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Want to know when the sun will rise or set in your neck of the woods? Search sunrise or sunset. You can also search for the sunrise/set times for other locations, as well.

Search for the Weather

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You can find out the weather in your area by simply searching weather—Google Autocomplete will even give you today's current forecast as you type. Conduct a search and Google will present an interactive card with weather information courtesy of The Weather Channel. 

By default, a search for weather will prompt an info card for the location of your IP address. However, you can also search weather [any location] to get the weather report for just about anywhere in the world, e.g. weather Toledo, OH or weather Kabul Afghanistan.

Real-Time Stock Quotes

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Type in any publicly traded company's ticker symbol and Google will present real-time price information on that company, e.g. GOOG (for Alphabet), AAPL (for Apple), or AMZN (for Amazon). Most of the larger exchanges are in real time, though Google offers a comprehensive disclaimer for which exchanges are on a delay.

Check Flight Times

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People may be flying less these days, but if you're headed to the airport or picking up a loved one, type in a flight number and Google will return a card with up-to-date times and terminal/gate information. If you're looking to book a flight, check out Google Flights to find the cheapest flights online.

Find Local Attractions

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If you're thinking about taking a trip, Google can help you find some interesting sights to see. Google any city or country you're thinking about visiting, and Google should include a series of Top Sights cards near the top of the search results. If you're searching for a city, click "More things to do." If you're searching for a country, click the travel guide button that Google provides. 

You will be taken to Google's travel page for that city or country, allowing you to see places to visit, popular food to try, suggested trips, and relevant travel articles. Additional tabs allow you to see flights, hotels, and rentals.

Shop With Google

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If you hate shopping and searching through several different websites to find what you need, use Google instead. Type in your search and click the Shopping tab to find images of what you want from different stores across the internet. Filter results further, if necessary, and when you're ready to make a purchase, click a listing to be taken directly to the store's webpage.

Track Google Results With Google Trends

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Ever wonder what other people are searching for? Google Trends allows anyone to see trending Google results and compare search terms. While it's primarily used by professionals, it can also be fun to see what topics are the most popular in your area. View search data, compare trending topics, view visualization maps, explore trending topics, review results from past years, and subscribe to specific search results.

Play Games in Google Search

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Google has a host of built-in games and tools you can access by Googling them, including Pac-Man, tic tac toe, Solitaire, Minesweeper, and Snake. Search flip a coin and Google will do it for you; same thing with a die or spinner. Google also has a built-in calculator, metronome, breathing exercise, and a color picker that provides the Hex Code and Decimal Code for any shade. 

Filter Explicit Content

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Have a kid using the computer? Protect them from explicit content with Google's SafeSearch feature. By opening Settings and selecting Turn on SafeSearch, you can filter out any explicit links, images, or video that may be deemed inappropriate for an all-ages audience. While Google admits it is not a 100 percent fix, it's a good start. (For a more robust solution, check out our picks for the Best Parental Control Software.)

Let Google Search for You

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With Google Alerts, you can create custom alerts that will notify you any time a new page is published containing your selected keywords. Create an Alert by first selecting an email address where these results will be sent, then add topics to track. Type in what you're looking for and Google will show you what the alert will look like with existing stories already indexed by the search engine. Choose how often you receive an update, the sources included, and a few other limitations.

I'm Feeling Something Else

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Remember Google's "I'm Feeling Lucky" button? Type in a search term and click I'm Feeling Lucky to be immediately taken to the first search result. It's a good way to save time when you know exactly what you're looking for. However, Google has added a new wrinkle that can help you find something else. 

Before you type anything into Google, hover over the I'm Feeling Lucky button and the wording will change. It may change to "I'm Feeling Adventurous," which will provide you with a coin to flip. "I'm Feeling Hungry" will Google nearby restaurants. "I'm Feeling Trendy" will show you recent Google trends. Every day there are new suggestions with different results.

Google Search Easter Eggs

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As we've detailed in the past, Google's engineers apparently have a lot of extra time on their hands with which to implement all manner of Easter eggs and April Fool's pranks. And why should Google's main raison d'etre be left out of the fun? Here are just a few cool Easter Eggs you can uncover through search.

  • "askew" will tilt your screen 
  •  Festivus" adds a Festivus pole to the left side of the screen
  • "do a barrel roll" or "z or r twice" will cause the screen to do a 360
  • "Google in 1998" will make the page appear as Google did in 1998

 [Source: This article was published in pcmag.com By Jason Cohen- Uploaded by the Association Member: Jennifer Levin]
Categorized in Search Engine

This blog will focus on the solution for user query “Gmail Storage full not receiving emails”. Here, we will explain multiple techniques to delete emails to create space in your Gmail account. Read all the methods carefully to fix the Gmail storage space issue.

Why Gmail storage space issue arrives?

Gmail is a well-known cloud-based web application that provides its user advanced features. Many people use it to send and receive email messages, Google photos, Google docs, and many more. Gmail is used extensively for both professional and personal purposes.

Gmail account has a storage capacity of 15 GB for its users and it covers Gmail, Google Photos, and Google drive. As the size of the email is rapidly growing due to an increase in the size of attachments such as docs, sheets, images, etc. This arises Gmail storage space issue, and user stops receiving emails in this Gmail account and all the incoming emails get bounce back.

To resolve the Gmail storage space issue for continuing receiving emails, it’s better to delete unwanted / less important emails from the Gmail account.

Methods to resolve Gmail storage full not receiving emails issue

Below, we have listed few methods to resolve Gmail storage full not receiving emails query of Gmail users.

We need to go to the URL as ‘myaccount.google.com’. Then, we need to choose ‘Data & personalization’ mentioned on the left sidebar. Then on the right-hand side, we need to select ‘ Account storage ’ and then ‘Manage storage’ to get the storage details.

The storage details are bifurcated into Google Drive, Gmail, and Google Photos with the storage used corresponding to them. Here, we can check which part of storage is taking more space. So, we can easily locate and remove the unnecessary file from that portion and create some space.

But, before deleting emails from your Gmail account, make sure to backup Gmail emails & attachments first to have a copy of emails for future need. Then, delete the emails to create space in your Gmail account.

For Business Gmail: Know How to Download G Suite Emails to Local Computer

Method 1: using Google in-build utility for backup

The simplest way to generate the storage space is to remove the unnecessary files, attachments, photos, and data in Google drive.

The backup can be taken by going into ‘https://myaccount.google.com’. Then, selecting ‘Data and personalization’ and click on ‘Download your data’.

Steps to delete Gmail emails to free up Gmail storage space:

In case of deletion of data date wise, we need to enter the date in the format in the Gmail account.

For example: In the search bar of the Gmail account, we can enter ‘before:2021/01/01’ in order to get the emails dated before 1 January 202. In order to get the emails after 1 January 2021, we need to enter ‘after:2021/01/01’ in the search bar of the Gmail account.

We can also delete the old data according to the file size. Here, we need to use the format ‘Larger:5M’, ‘Older_than:1y’ or we can customize the file size and the year in the search bar and then remove the files.

We can make deletion according to the selected folder. In this case, we need to click on the selected folder and then, manually choose the unnecessary files that we don’t want to keep.

Therefore, we can see that there are three ways of manually filtering the data as follows:

  • Date wise
  • File Size
  • Folder wise

The drawback of such an activity is that it does not allow the deletion of the intermediate data. The date filter option ranging ‘from’ and ‘to’ is not available.
It is very important to take the backup of data before deletion. Therefore, it is not possible to take up the backup of folders manually as it may take long hours or days.

Method 2: automatically backup & delete emails to free up space

There are third-party tools available as an instant solution to archive Gmail emails and the option to automatically delete them in order to create storage space. It does not take hours or days as it is taken while doing manually. In just a few minutes you can create space in your Gmail account to continue receiving new emails. You can also use the folder filter of the automated tool to take the backup of particular folder emails and delete only those folder emails to create more storage space.

Method 3: using emails in another Gmail account

In case all of our emails are important and we don’t want to delete any one of them, then we can migrate those emails to a new Gmail account.

In order to migrate the emails from one Gmail account to another Gmail account, then we need to do the following steps:

  1. We need to create a new Gmail account.
  2. Now, we need to go to the settings of the old Gmail account from where we need to migrate our emails.
  3. Now, we need to click on ‘ Forwarding and POP/IMAP ‘ then, choose the option ‘ Enable POP for all mail ‘ and choose ‘ delete Gmail’s copy’.
  4. Now, we need to open the new Gmail account and go to the settings. Now, select ‘ Accounts and Import ‘ from the above menu and then, click ‘Import mail and contacts‘.
  5. A pop-up window would appear on the screen. We need to enter the email id from where we want to import the email files and then click on ‘ Continue ‘.
  6. Another pop-up window would appear now to ask for our permission. So, now click on ‘Allow’ and then choose the import options and then click the ‘Start Import’ button.
  7. Now, we need to wait for Google to transfer all the emails to our new Gmail account. Once the transfer is complete then we would be able to see all the emails in the new Gmail.

However, the drawback of such an activity is that it may take long hours or days to complete the transfer of the data. Also, if internet issues arise, it may lead to loss of data too.

Why do we care?

If Gmail is your default email client, then you are continuously receiving emails, either personal, business, or promotional. In just a matter of years, your Gmail will run out of storage space and you will stop receiving emails anymore. So, it’s better to occasionally back up your account and delete unwanted emails and documents.

If you are also a user who is also facing ‘Gmail storage full not receiving emails’ then this blog provide helps you with multiple techniques to take the backup of your emails and delete them to create storage space and continue receiving emails.

 [Source: This article was published in bestinau.com.au By Robert Allardice - Uploaded by the Association Member: Alex Gray]
Categorized in Social

Find the exact email you've been looking for, or finally reach Inbox Zero

Gmail is one of Google's best products, as it's far more than just a simple service for sending and receiving email. It has dozens of powerful features lurking under the surface to help you manage the onslaught of messages, which can come in handy during this age of increased remote work. With the right know-how, you can tell Gmail to find and sort your messages exactly how you want, potentially saving you many hours of micro-managing your inbox.

In this guide, we'll go over the basics of Gmail search, then cover the more advanced filters. Whether you just want to find specific messages or set up long-term filters to help with overflowing inboxes, you've come to the right place.

The basics

Gmail has a large search bar at the top of the screen, typically used for searching by names or simple phrases. When you start typing something, the first few results appear below the bar, or you can press Enter (or click the search button) to see all available results. Pretty simple.

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Gmail's regular text search includes results from an email's subject field, senders, and message contents. That means searching for common words and phrases can sometimes give you too many messages to look through. That's where filters come in — they can trim the results down to more manageable sizes.

You might have noticed the small buttons that appear on search pages. These are called 'chips,' and they can help you filter results without opening the Advanced Search panel or typing your own filters. For example, clicking the 'Has attachment' chip will hide all messages that don't have an attached file.

Simple words and phrases combined with Gmail's chips will usually help you find the exact messages you're looking for. But what if you want to set up permanent filters for a specific search? That's where Gmail's advanced search functionality comes in.

Advanced search

You might have noticed the 'Advanced search' link that appears below the search bar after you search for something — it's also accessible by clicking the downwards-pointing arrow in the search bar. The advanced search is a popup with various fields to help you narrow down results. You can filter messages by the sent date, message size, sender name, subject phrase, and more.

The advanced search popup has two buttons at the bottom. The 'Search' button shows you the results for whatever you type in, but the 'Create filter' button will create a message filter with the options you've entered. Clicking the latter option will take you to a second screen, where you can define exactly what happens to messages that the filter catches.

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Once you have everything set to how you want, you can click the 'Create filter' button to activate the filter. By default, filters don't do anything to existing messages, but you can change this by clicking the checkbox for 'Also apply a filter to matching conversations.'

You can access all your saved filters by going to Gmail's settings (click the Settings gear -> 'See all settings') and clicking the tab for 'Filters and Blocked Addresses.' This page also allows you to export filters to an XML file, for importing later into another Gmail account.

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Let's go over a few practical examples of Gmail filters. Maybe you're subscribed to a few newsletters, but you don't want them mixed in with regular messages in your inbox. A simple way to do this is by creating a filter with "Unsubscribe" in the "Has the words" field, then setting it to skip the inbox and apply a label (e.g. make a new one called 'Newsletters'). Then you could check your newsletters at any time by clicking the proper label in the Gmail sidebar, instead of seeing them pile up in your inbox.

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Sample Gmail filter for organizing newsletters

Alternatively, let's say a certain company keeps emailing you with spam, even though you've tried unsubscribing. Gmail allows you to block addresses, but automated messages sometimes use multiple addresses. You can create a filter with an asterisk (*) in parts of the field, which functions as a wildcard. For example, typing "*@newegg.com" in the From field would match all emails with the domain newegg.com. After you have a search set up, you can set the filter to automatically delete all matching emails.

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Gmail's default search fields, combined with the filter options on the second screen, should be enough for most use cases. However, if you need layered searches (e.g. do this OR that if X is true) or a filter option that Gmail doesn't show in the popup, read on.

Multi-step filters and basic operators

You might have noticed that Gmail's search/filter interface adds terms like "from:" or "to:" or "subject:" to the search field. These are called search operators, and they can be combined to trim down your results. Gmail types these for you when you use the search interface, but once you grasp how they work, you can make your own complex searches and filters by typing directly in the search bar.

Let's say you wanted to search for all your delivery emails from Amazon. You could type something like this in the search bar, which would show messages sent from any Amazon address with the word "delivery" in the email somewhere:

from:*@amazon.com "delivery"

However, this might not catch all delivery emails. If your package wasn't delivered, the email might not say "delivery" exactly. Adding additional terms like "package" or "order" could give you better results. This is where Gmail's "OR" operator comes in. Here's an updated example:

from:*@amazon.com ("delivery" OR "package" OR "order")

Now we're using parentheses to add nested logic to the filter. In the above example, two factors have to be true: the email has to be from Amazon, and it must contain either "delivery," "package," or "order." If you wanted to keep going and add more retail stores, you could do something like this:

(*@amazon.com OR *@target.com OR *@walmart.com) ("delivery" OR "package" OR "order") 

Now we have a search that looks for emails from Amazon, Target, and Walmart with the phrases specified in the second half. If it helps readability, you can also add "AND" to the middle (between the two sets of parentheses), and Gmail will still understand it.

Hidden operators and filters

Gmail has many more operators and filter options than the advanced search popup shows. You can sort by attachments (even by file type), links to Google Drive files or YouTube videos, dates, messages from Google Chat, message size, and much more. Below is the full list of filters from the Gmail support website, as of January 2020.

What you can search bySearch operator & example
Specify the sender from:
Example: from:amy
Specify a recipient to:
Example: to:david
Specify a recipient who received a copy cc: bcc:
Example: cc:david
Words in the subject line subject:
Example: subject:dinner
Messages that match multiple terms OR or { }
Example: from:amy OR from:david
Example: {from:amy from:david}
Remove messages from your results -
Example: dinner -movie
Find messages with words near each other. Use the number to say how many words apart the words can be Add quotes to find messages in which the word you put first stays first. AROUND
Example: holiday AROUND 10 vacation
Example: "secret AROUND 25 birthday"
Messages that have a certain label label:
Example: label:friends
Messages that have an attachment has:attachment
Example: has:attachment
Messages that have a Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, or Slides attachment or link has:drive
has:document
has:spreadsheet
has:presentation
Messages that have a YouTube video has:youtube
Messages from a mailing list list:
Example: list:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Attachments with a certain name or file type filename:
Example: filename:pdf Example: filename:homework.txt
Search for an exact word or phrase " "
Example: "dinner and movie tonight"
Group multiple search terms together ( )
Example: subject:(dinner movie)
Messages in any folder, including Spam and Trash in:anywhere
Example: in:anywhere movie
Search for messages that are marked as important is:important label:important
Starred, snoozed, unread, or read messages is:starred
is:snoozed
is:unread
is:read
Messages that include an icon of a certain color has:yellow-star
has:blue-info
has:purple-star
Recipients in the cc or bcc field cc: bcc:
Example: cc:david
Note: You can't find messages that you received on bcc.
Search for messages sent during a certain time period after: before: older: newer:
Example: after:2004/04/16
Example: after:04/16/2004
Search for messages older or newer than a time period using d (day), m (month), and y (year) older_than: newer_than:
Example: newer_than:2d
Chat messages is:chat
Example: is:chat movie
Search by email for delivered messages deliveredto:
Example: deliveredto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Messages in a certain category category:primary
category:social
category:promotions
category:updates
category:forums
category:reservations
category:purchases
Messages larger than a certain size in bytes size:
Example: size:1000000
Messages larger or smaller than a certain size in bytes larger: smaller:
Example: larger:10M
Results that match a word exactly +
Example: +unicorn
Messages with a certain message-id header Rfc822msgid:
Example: rfc822msgid:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Messages that have or don't have a label has:userlabels has:nouserlabels
Example: has:nouserlabels
Note: Labels are only added to a message, and not an entire conversation.

Let's go over a few helpful examples that use the above operators. Maybe you're a student with a professor who sent out a message with an important document attached, but you can't find it. Something like the below search could help you out:

from:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. has:attachment

Another helpful search is using the "size" operator to look for large messages that may be cutting into your Gmail/Google account storage. The below example would find all messages 5MB or larger:

size:5m

In terms of filters, maybe your friends and family are constantly sending you videos, and you want to keep them all in one easy-to-access location. You can use a search like the one below, then create a filter with it that adds a label like 'Videos':

has:youtube OR "twitch.tv" OR "tiktok.com"  OR "dailymotion.com"

However, there is one issue that affects filters like the one above — Gmail doesn't have a way to search by link URLs. For example, the above filter would only work for messages where the link's text was the URL. The filter would catch messages that spelled out "youtube.com" or "tiktok.com", but not messages where the link text said something different.

[Source: This article was published in androidpolice.com By Corbin Davenport - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Internet Search

Facebook allows search engines like Google to index your profile and publicly available information. But if you don’t want people to be able to look up your social profile outside of Facebook, you can choose to delist it. Here’s how.

First, head over to Facebook’s website using your Windows 10, Mac, or Linux desktop browser and sign in to your account.

Next, click the arrow in the top-right corner of the social network to reveal a dropdown menu, then select “Settings & Privacy.”

facebook website settings

Navigate to “Settings.”

settings menu facebook website

Select “Privacy” from the column on the left.

visit facebook privacy settings

Scroll down toward the bottom of the page, and under the “How people can find and contact you” section, you’ll find an option called “Do you want search engines outside of Facebook to link to your Profile?”

delist-facebook-profile-search-engine-settings.png

Click the blue “Edit” button located beside that option.

delist-facebook-profile-search-engine.png

Uncheck the box next to “Allow search engines outside of Facebook to link to your Profile.”

block-search-engines-from-linking-facebook-profile.png

In the following pop-up message, click “Turn Off.”

turn-off-search-engine-linking-facebook-profile.png

Finally, select the “Close” option to save your new preference.

block-search-engine-indexing-facebook-profile.png

That’s it. Now, Facebook will prevent search engines outside of the social network from linking your profile in their results.

Note: This setting will take at least a few weeks to come into effect. Even after Facebook processes the request on its end, your information and profile link will continue to exist in search engines’ cache and will surface in search results. Once Facebook relays the updated preference to sites such as Google, Yahoo, and Bing, they will take some additional time to reflect the changes.

In addition, while search engines will no longer be able to directly link your profile in results, they can crawl your publicly available information, like posts and your full name. Due to this loophole, anyone with the right keywords can still locate your Facebook profile through search engines.

 [Source: This article was published in howtogeek.com By Shubham - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson]
Categorized in Internet Privacy

No one loves email bounce backs, primarily when SDRs conduct cold email campaigns. According to a recent report by Constant Contact, the average email bounce rate is 7.75%.

But the good email bounce rate is less than 2%. Anything above 2% is considered critical.

Email verification techniques can be used to reduce your email bounce backs. It cleans your email list by filtering the spammy and invalid addresses that help you in proceeding towards your email campaign securely. But many email professionals are unaware of how to verify email addresses.

This article will help them with multiple email verification processes, and it’s best practices to improve email deliverability in a considerable amount.

Table of Contents

  1. Why should we verify email addresses?
  2. How to verify email address before sending cold emails?
  3. How frequently should you validate your email list?
  4. What’s next? Cold email campaign

Why should we verify email addresses?

Before jumping into the steps to verify the email addresses, let’s go through the quick benefits of email verification. This will help you understand the advantages of email verifications and its consequences.

1. Stay away from bounces

As discussed, email bounces are the biggest nightmares of a cold email campaign. Continous bounce back degrades your email account’s authenticity and domain quality. Your email account might get listed in the spam index of various email service providers (ESP) and end up by getting blocked.

If you verify your email list before sending a cold email, you can easily segregate your good contacts from the bad ones. Ultimately it will decrease your email bounce rate and make you stay away from spam indexes.

2. Better sender reputation score and email deliverability

Every email account has a sender reputation score that helps the recipient’s ESP to decide the quality of the email. The higher the score, the better is the email deliverability and vice versa.

If you send emails to invalid or spammy email accounts frequently, it can lead to suspension of your email account.

Verifying your email account helps you in getting your emails to the right recipient in an authentic manner. This will keep your email account healthy and increase your reputation score.

3. Getting better results from your email campaign

You import a list of recipients for scheduling an email campaign. With large lists, the chances of email bounce also increase. This eventually affects your whole email campaign performance.

Also, you spend a lot of time and energy on an email campaign, which might go to vain if it doesn’t provide you with the desired results.

Email account verification excludes the bad contacts from your lists, which increases your email deliverability. You also receive a higher open rate and reply rate that boosts your email campaigning performance.

To grab all the above benefits, you need to know the best email verification practices that can help you in landing your emails directly in your recipient’s mailbox. 

Below we are listing the 7 best tactics to verify your email addresses for getting the best results.

How to verify an email address before sending cold emails?

There are multiple techniques to verify email addresses. Some of them require advanced knowledge of email technology. However, in this section, we have added some easy techniques to verify your email accounts. We have also tried to provide simplified solutions to tackle the technical difficulties associated with it.

1. Check the email syntax

Typographical and syntax errors are one of the most usual issues with email addresses. They can be manually checked and modified. The standard email address follows the format of This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. It has three mandatory parts (unique identifier, @, and domain name).

The xyz in the email address is considered as the unique identifier of the email. It can be a maximum of 64 characters long and can consist of:

  • Uppercase and lowercase letters in English (A-Z, a-z)
  • Digits from 0 to 9
  • Special characters such as ! # $ % & ‘ * + – / = ? ^ _ ` { |

The @abc in the syntax example is the domain name. This is usually the same as the business domain, like @saleshandy.com or email service providers like @gmail.com.

You need to check your recipient’s email address must follow the required syntax. Any other format other than this syntax is faulty and is more likely to bounce back. Also, check the typographical mistakes like @gmal.com or @yahooo.co, leading to the bouncing back of your emails.

2. Ping the server

Pinging the server is a technical method to verify email address without sending emails. You need a tool like PuTTY for Telnet in Windows system to perform this check. If you are using a Mac system, you can use the iTerm app. 

Follow the below steps to check to ping the email server.

  • Enable Telnet in windows.
  • Open command prompt, type the nslookup command: nslookup –type=mx domain.com
  • You will find multiple MX records associated with the domain. Pick the one with the lowest preference number.
  • Connect to the telnet server with the command: telnet {mail server address} 25
  • Handshake with the server by typing: HELO
  • Next, provide your identity with a random email address: mail from: {random email address}
  • As the next step add the email address you want to verify: rcpt to: {email address to verify}
  • The server will reply back with an OK or some error message. If the message is OK, then the email address is valid.

Ping the server

Source

This method is accurate and provides the best results, but it’s very tedious and might affect your system negatively.

3. Send an email from a different account

You can verify the email deliverability to an email account by sending them an email, but doing that from your primary email account is risky. It is suggested to create a dummy email address and try out sending emails to your recipients. Further, you can clean up the bounced accounts from your email list manually.

Although this method works, it is quite tedious as of doing each work twice. 

4. DNS lookup

DNS Lookup technique is used to check the authenticity of the domain. It also provides you with any blacklist or spammy data associated with the domain. To conduct a DNS lookup, follow the steps below:

  • Open MXToolbox DNS Check in your browser
  • Add the recipient’s domain name in the text box provided and click on DNS check
  • You will get a list of hostname and details of the DNS records
  • If you don’t see any details of the provided domain, the domain is most probably available.

DNS lookup

This test provides you the accuracy of the recipient’s domain but still can’t assure 100% deliverability.

5. Perform an IP address lookup

IP address lookup is another way to check the authenticity of the recipient’s email account. This lookup helps you by providing the IP details of the recipient’s email address. Follow the steps below to do an IP address lookup.

To start the IP address lookup, we need to find the IP address of the recipient as the first step.

  • Open MX Toolbox in your browser
  • Add your recipient’s email address in the text box and click on MX Lookup
  • You will get a list of IP addresses associated with the email address. You can choose any one of them

In the next step, we will start with the IP address lookup. You can find many IP address lookup tools like whatismyipaddress over the internet that can provide the IP details of the recipient’s email server.

Perform an IP address lookup

You can check with the location servers and ISP details provided in the results of the lookup. If you find anything unusual, then it’s a case of email spoofing and the email address is risky.

6. Use an email verification tool

An email verification tool can help you in doing all the technical verifications in one go. You just need to add the email list, and the automated system will verify all the email addresses for you. The other methods listed above are tedious, and each task has to be done individually. You can use a bulk email verifier tool to verify an email list and get results in a fraction of a minute. This will help you in spending less time in email verification and providing your valuable time for cold email campaigns.

7. Verify your email list while sending cold emails

If you are planning to send a cold email campaign and hunting for a technique to verify your email list, then this section is for you. You can use SalesHandy to verify your bulk email list and send cold emails together.

Follow the simple steps below to verify and schedule a cold email campaign.

  1. Sign Up with SalesHandy and login to the web-app
  2. Click on the email campaign from the right side menu followed by the New Campaign button
  3. Upload your email list in a CSV format
  4. Soon, you will get a pop-up to verify your email list
  5. Click on Start to commence your email verification process
  6. It will take a few minutes and you can get your email list divided into 3 parts: Valid, Invalid, and Risky. It is suggested to proceed only with Valid contacts for the best results. (Check the video below for better understanding)

Read More...

 [Source: This article was published in saleshandy.com By Rajendra Roul - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin]
Categorized in Investigative Research

Privacy-first search engine DuckDuckGo's year was productive in 2020. The search engine managed to increase daily search queries significantly in 2020 and 2021 is already looking to become another record year as the search engine broke the 100 million search queries mark on a single day for the first time on January 11, 2021.

Looking back at 2019, the search engine recorded over 15 billion search queries in that year. In 2020, the number of queries rose to more than 23 billion search queries. These two years alone make up the queries for more than one-third of the company's entire existence, and the company was founded in 2008. In 2015 for example, DuckDuckGo managed to cross the 12 million queries per day mark for the first time.

In 2020, DuckDuckGo's daily average searches increased by 62%.

DuckDuckGo received more than 100 million search queries in January 2021 for the first time. The first week of the year saw growth from less than 80 million queries to stable mid-80 million queries, and the past week saw that number jump to mid-90 million queries, with the record-breaking day on Monday last week.

Queries have gone down under 100 million again in the past days -- DuckDuckGo does not display data for the past couple of days -- and it is possible that numbers will remain under 100 million for a time.

One of the search engine's main focuses is privacy. It promises that searches are anonymous and that no records of user activity are kept; major search engines like Google track users to increase money from advertising.

DuckDuckGo does benefit whenever privacy is discussed in the news, and it is quite possible that the Facebook-WhatsApp data-sharing change was the main driver for the rise in the search engine's number of queries.

DuckDuckGo's search market share has risen to 1.94% in the United States according to Statcounter. Google is still leading with 89.19% of all searches, followed by Bing and Yahoo following respectively with 5.86% and 2.64% of all searches.

Statcounter data is not 100% accurate as it is based on tracking code that is installed on over 2 million sites globally.

Closing Words

DuckDuckGo's traffic is rising year over year, and there does not seem to be an end in sight. If the trend continues, it could eventually surpass Yahoo and then Bing in the United States to become the second most used search engine in the country.

Privacy concerns and scandals will happen in 2020 -- they have happened every year -- and each will contribute its share to the continued rise of DuckDuckGo's market share.

Now You: do you use DuckDuckGo? What is your take on this development? (via Bleeping Computer)

[Source: This article was published in ghacks.net By Martin Brinkmann - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]
Categorized in Search Engine

Surely it often happens to you that in your searches on Google you do not find results as useful as you expected. So today I bring you something that I think you will like. These are advanced search operators that will make your life easier when it comes to finding valuable resources.

The Internet has exponentially multiplied the information that we can access with a single click. Thanks to the processing of large volumes of data (Big Data), we can obtain an instant response to a complex query in search engines such as Google. We can even find what we need without having to navigate through different websites.

However, the Google BERT algorithm has improved the accuracy of search results.  A large amount of accessible content bombards us and sometimes makes it difficult to find valuable information. We live in the age of information or “infoxication”.

But do not despair, the method that I show you today will help you to carry out your searches effectively. Eliminating all the noise to get to the content you really want. What you are going to learn is how to get better-filtered results using tools at your fingertips, such as Google’s advanced search operators.

How To Do advanced searches on Google

An advanced search utility is available on Google. This search is carried out from a small, very easy to use form where you can fill in various search fields to specify what you want to find.  In this article, I will show you the most popular and basic search commands. If you want to learn more, you can check this list of Google search operators (50+ operators) prepared by Olga Zarzeczna.

The basic Google operators

I assume that you are already familiar with some of the main search operators, also called commands or footprints, that can be used in Google. For example, the exact match operator, enclosed in quotation marks (” “). This operator offers you precision by returning the results that contain the exact phrase.

But I bet you didn’t know these others: Asterisk operator.

This operator is very useful when you do not remember or do not know part of the search terms. So that you understand it better, it is a wild card. Maybe you are looking for an expression that you only remember part of. Well, you could add the Asterisk in the part that you don’t remember. You can also combine it with quotation marks to further narrow the search.

Search word exclusion

If you add the symbol “-” in front of a specific word in your search, you can exclude that keyword from the results that are presented to you.

Search by number range

Google gives you the option to search for a range of numbers. This is done by writing the lower and upper values ​​and adding a colon between them. This operator is especially useful when looking for price ranges.

Boolean operators

Also known as logical operators, Boolean operators are commands based on Boolean algebra. They allow you to logically connect the concepts or groups of terms that you are looking for to expand, limit or define your searches quickly. As well as being very simple, they will notably improve the efficiency of your searches.

AND operator

It is a presence operator. Finds results that include all of the search terms that have been specified regardless of their relative position and order. The greater the number of terms joined by the operator, the fewer the results and the more accurate will be your query to Google.

OR operator

It is useful for indicating associations between words or synonyms in your search. We can say that it is used to make several queries in the same search since you will obtain results that respond to the term or group of terms that is on one side of the OR as well as the one that is on the other side.

NOT operator

It is also known as an exclusion operator. Finds results that do not contain the term written after the operator. For example, if you query SEO NOT sem, the result will only return the contents where SEO appears but not sem.

Site: operator

With this operator, searches are limited to that particular website or domain. It is very good to search for a specific topic indexed by Google within a specific website.

Inanchor operator

This operator is key if you want, it will help you find links to resources of interest. When you use it, Google will return the search results that contain the keywords as text in a link. It is also very useful for SEO because you can find websites where you are already linking to a specific type of resource like the one you have on your blog. So you can get them to link you easily.

Filetype operator

This command will be useful to you to find documentation according to the type of file: pdf, docx, xlx, ppt, etc. All you have to do is do a normal search and add the filetype operator “filetype” at the end.

 [Source: This article was published in southfloridareporter.com By Mark Jonson - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon]
Categorized in Search Engine

The dark web is full of dangerous stuff, but how does it affect your security directly?

The dark web is a mysterious place with a crazy reputation. Contrary to belief, finding the dark web isn't difficult. However, learning how to navigate it safely can be, especially if you don't know what you're doing or what to expect.

Hackers and scammers use the anonymity the dark web gives them to launch attacks on a wide range of targets, including consumers and businesses.

MakeUseOf spoke to Echosec Systems James Villeneuve about dark web threats, intelligence gathering, and security planning.

How Do Dark Web Threats Affect Corporate Security Planning?

The dark web is an ever-present backdrop for security planning. Just as cybersecurity firms do not underestimate the power of the dark web—that is, the users, forums, and organizations lurking there—corporate security planning is increasingly weighing those threats into their security planning.

James Villeneuve says:

Corporate security teams can no longer turn a blind eye to the growing threat landscape across the deep web and the dark web. With large corporations likely to experience, on average, one crisis per year, security planning has to identify where these crises are originating from online and begin developing a more proactive approach to monitoring.

Can Security Teams Actively Search the Dark Web for Threats?

One of the biggest draws of the dark web is privacy and anonymity. First, you can only access the dark web using specialized software, such as the Tor Browser. This software comes equipped with the special routing and privacy add-ons required to access the Tor network.

The structure of the dark web is meant to keep the sites, services, and users anonymous. When you use Tor to access the darknet, your internet traffic moves through several anonymous nodes from your computer to the site you want to visit.

Furthermore, the dark web isn't indexed in the same way as the regular internet. Websites on the Tor network don't use the DNS system that the normal internet uses.

Scanning the dark web for threats, then, requires special tools. For example, Echosec Beacon is a specialized threat intelligence tool that scans darknet marketplaces for stolen credentials, leaked data, and illicit goods, detects data breaches, and can provide early warning and insight into conversations relating to specific organizations on dark web forums.

Villeneuve explains:

Monitoring the communities that are discussing, planning, and propagating these threats, organizations are beginning to value and prioritize more proactive security strategies. With the average cost of a data breach now equalling over $3.86 million (IBM, 2019), the ability to prevent such breaches can save an organization millions in damages.

Does the Dark Web Provide a False Sense of Security?

As the dark web carries a strong reputation for privacy, it is no surprise that attackers and criminal organizations gather there to plan and launch attacks. The idea of a hidden service operating on a highly secure anonymous network provides users with a strong sense of privacy and security.

However, this feeling can lead users to make mistakes in their personal security. Furthermore, that sense of privacy and security provides the platform for people to discuss and plan "a great deal of nefarious activity... illegal goods sales, money laundering, and human exploitation" all happen on the dark web.

When users feel more comfortable in their surroundings, discussing plans for a cyber attack or details of their employer, they might give away more information than they realize.

In terms of "regular" dark web users, who are perhaps simply visiting the dark web version of Facebook or the BBC News website, these privacy issues aren't of a similar concern. The examples provided involve users interacting with and posting on dark web forums.

Posting to these forums can create traceability, especially if the users' operational security is poor (such as using the same username on multiple sites, revealing personal information, etc.).

Can Users Do More to Protect Themselves on the Dark Web?

When asked about security experience and responsibility, James Villeneuve says:

Your IT team simply cannot be the only team with security training. Security awareness training is paramount for all employees, in large corporations as well as SMEs. Empowering your staff with this knowledge can allow them to identify and prevent social engineering, spear-phishing, and ransomware attacks.

Security extends into all areas of life. So many of our important services are online. Learning how to use them safely is becoming a necessity, in that learning how to spot and detect phishing emails goes a long way in securing your online accounts. You should also consider how to create and use strong passwords.

But in terms of the dark web, the basics remain the same, with some extra tweaks. For example, aimlessly browsing the dark web isn't a good idea. You might click a link that takes you somewhere you don't want to go, with dangerous content at the other end.

Secondly, the dark web isn't really made for browsing in the same way as the regular internet.

Finally, there are hoaxes everywhere on the dark web. You'll almost certainly encounter sites offering services that simply don't exist.

Is the Dark Web Illegal?

The dark web itself isn't illegal. The dark web is an overlay network, which is a network that runs on top of another network. So, the network itself is completely legal.

However, there is illegal content on the dark web, some of which could land you in prison for a very long time if caught accessing it.

Then there is the exposure to other dangerous content, such as the darknet marketplaces and so on. Browsing a darknet marketplace isn't itself illegal, but purchasing the illicit goods on there is very likely to be, depending on your locale.

The other consideration goes to local laws regarding encryption. In some countries, the use of strong encryption is illegal as it makes government snooping much harder. Which, of course, they don't like.

You cannot access the dark web without using some form of encryption. The Tor network has strong encryption at its core. Accessing the dark web in a country with anti-encryption laws could see you fall foul of the government, so it pays to check before accessing the dark web.

Stay Safe on the Dark Web

You can access and use the dark web securely, but businesses and other organizations should be aware of the threats that can lurk there. Unfortunately, many of these threats are unseen, which is where dark web monitoring tools such as the Echosec System Platform can make a difference.

 [Source: This article was published in makeuseof.com By Gavin Phillips - Uploaded by the Association Member: Grace Irwin]
Categorized in Deep Web

As you scroll through the local listings in Google Maps, Google may show you web results at the bottom.

Brian Barwig spotted Google displaying web search results in the Google Maps local search results listings for an individual business. Brian, a local SEO, said “we are noticing a new section, “Web Results”.  We, at Search Engine Land, were able to replicate this.

Where to see it. Go to a business listing in Google Maps and scroll past the business information and towards the bottom, you will see “Web Results.”

What it looks like. Here is a screenshot from my business listing:

google-local-web-results-listing-800x533.jpg

Web results in local. Google tends to try to keep local search and web search results separate but there has been overlapping before. Google did show web site mentions in the local results before. Google also leverages algorithms used in web searches for local searches, such as neutral matching and others.

Why we care. If potential customers scroll down your local listing in Google Maps and the web results do not look appropriate for your business, that can end up being a turn off for those customers. Do your best to make sure those web results are accurate, the snippets and content in the results look good, just in case someone does scroll down to look at them.

 [Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore]

Categorized in Search Engine

As a brand or business, it’s not enough for you to intimately know your products and services. You also have to know your industry and customers inside and out if you want to achieve the highest level of success. To help you gain these insights, there are sites for market research that can offer a deeper look at your business and uncover ways to win over your audience.

What Is Market Research and Why Does It Matter?

Market research is the act of gathering and analyzing data about the position of a product or service in a market. It looks at information regarding current customer interest and potential growth.

The market analysis also gathers information about the people who are and might be interested in a product or service. It interprets data as they relate to customer spending habits, geographic locations, industry competitors, and economic conditions.

These insights help you find out:

  • How many people are likely to become your customers
  • Who your customers are
  • Why they buy
  • How they buy
  • How much they buy
  • Why they buy from you
  • Why they buy from a competitor
  • Where there might be opportunities for niche marketing

To find answers to these questions, there are many sites for market research that can help you uncover insights about your customers and industry.

The Best Sites for Market Research

Some of the best sites for market research include the following tools, platforms, and research methods. Use these free marketing research websites to gain insights into your industry, customer base, and potential for growth.

U.S. Census Data Tools

A vital part of marketing research is determining your market size or the potential reach of your products or service. Research to see how many people you could reasonably expect to become your customers. For this type of research, there are U.S. Census data tools. The site has more than a dozen online market research tools and free industry research reports that help you gain insight into demographics and geographic locations of populations who might be interested in your offerings.

US Census online market research tool

SBA’s Office of Entrepreneurship Education Resources

Another one of the best sites for market research as it relates to customer demographics and economic statistics is the U.S. Small Business Administration website. Their Office of Entrepreneurship Education has a variety of market research analysis tools, resources, and reports that provide information useful for learning about customer statistics, product production, economic factors, and data you can use for your marketing intelligence.

Online-market-research-tools.png

Pew Research Center

For more reports and datasets to use in your market research, search the Pew Research Center. The company conducts “public opinion polling, demographic research, content analysis, and other data-driven social science research,” all of which offer insights into social, industry, and media trends. The varied and in-depth reports help businesses get a data-focused perspective on the topics shaping industries and geographic areas.

Market-Research-Reports.png

Statista

For researching data and stats, Statista is another one of the best sites for market research. The site includes datasets on topics in over 600 industries. In addition to providing hard data, Statista also provides many supporting charts and infographics that make the data easy to consume, understand, and use in your market analysis.

Stats-Market-Research.png

Google Surveys

One of the most powerful ways to learn about your target market is to ask questions. Creating surveys and distributing them to people who match the characteristics of your ideal audience allows you to get direct insight into the minds of your target customers. One of the best sites for market research like this is Google Surveys. You create a survey, describe who you want to take the survey, and Google pools people who match your criteria, and provides you with the results.

free sites for marketing research

SurveyMonkey

Getting information from people who match the criteria of your ideal customer is useful and so is gathering data from the people who actually do business with you. A part of your market research should include surveying your current customers to gain insight into their buying decision process and information that can help you create buyer personas. To perform this type of research, use SurveyMonkey to create surveys that you can distribute to your list of current customers.

Marketing-research-websites.png

Alexa Tools

Researching your audience is a powerful way to gain insights to use in your marketing intelligence, which is why Alexa is one of the best sites for market research. Using Alexa, you can uncover a variety of details about your audience’s demographics, interests, and habits.

Audience Overlap Tool

The Audience Overlap Tool allows you to enter your website or up to 10 competitors to see a list of other websites that the audience regularly frequents.

Best-Sites-for-Market-Research.png

This helps you get to know what other interests your audience has as you can see what other types of websites they use. Demo the tool for free and find similar sites now.

Competitive Keyword Matrix

Using Alexa to create a competitive website analysis is another way to conduct market research. One such tool for performing this analysis is the Competitive Keyword Matrix tool. The Competitive Keyword Matrix helps you get a look at the terms your ideal audience is using in search to find your website and your competitors’ websites. You can use this report to see which terms are leading your target audience to competitors and create a plan to target those similar keywords.

Sites-for-Market-Research-Keywords.png

Site Overview

The Site Overview Tool allows you to enter a website and receive a report on the website’s top keywords, traffic sources, audience geography, and other sites with an overlapping audience.

City Town Info

To get more detailed demographic information as it relates to careers and geographic areas, use City Town Info. The site allows you to search by region and explore details about what types of jobs and college experience residents of those areas have. The data helps businesses get to know the people living in specific areas around the U.S. and gather insights into what they do, how much they earn, how much education they have, and more.

Demographic-Market-Research.png

Google Trends

Google offers another one of the best sites for market research with Google Trends. It allows you to get insight into the minds of consumers and audiences. The tool helps you see what topics and stories are popular by displaying reports on the top, most searched for terms. You can use filter functions to see trending stories based on region and category to gain more insight into the areas that are most relevant to your audience and industry.

Trends-Market-Research.png

Social Mention

Another tool that helps you get a radar on industry trends and hot topics is Social Mention. The tool curates social posts that mention a target search term. It also provides details about the search term such as audience sentiment (how users feel about the term) and reaches (how much influence the term has). To gain insight into your business or industry, you can search both your brand name and related terms to get an idea of how audiences feel about the topic.

Social-Media-Market-Research-Sites.png

Start Your Market Research Today

When it comes to understanding and winning over more customers, don’t rely on guesses, estimates, or feelings. Get the facts. Do a detailed competitive analysis of your industry using these sites for market research and discover new growth potential for your business and the path you need to take to get there.

To get help with your market research, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan. It includes the Audience Overlap, Site Overview, and Competitive Keyword Matrix Tools mentioned in this post along with dozens of other tools that help you learn about your customers, competitors, and industry.

 [Source: This article was published in blog.alexa.com - Uploaded by the Association Member: Robert Hensonw] 
Categorized in Business Research

AOFIRS

World's leading professional association of Internet Research Specialists - We deliver Knowledge, Education, Training, and Certification in the field of Professional Online Research. The AOFIRS is considered a major contributor in improving Web Search Skills and recognizes Online Research work as a full-time occupation for those that use the Internet as their primary source of information.

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