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A new spam algorithm is rolling out over the next two weeks aimed at fighting link spam more broadly. 

Google is rolling out the link spam update today and throughout the next two weeks. This link spam update targets spammy links “more broadly” and “across multiple languages,” Duy Nguyen, a Google search quality analyst, said.

The announcement. Google wrote “in our continued efforts to improve the quality of the search results, we’re launching a new link spam-fighting change today — which we call the “link spam update.” This algorithm update, which will roll out across the next two weeks, is even more effective at identifying and nullifying link spam more broadly, across multiple languages. Sites taking part in link spam will see changes in Search as those links are re-assessed by our algorithms.”

Nullifying link spam. You can see the word Google used here was “nullifying,” which does not necessarily mean “penalize,” but instead, to ignore or simply not count. Google’s efforts around link spam have been to ignore and not count spammy links since Penguin 4.0 was released in 2016.

Might feel like a penalty. While Google may not penalize your site for these spammy links if Google ignores or nullifies links that may have been helping a site rank well in Google Search, that might feel like a penalty. In short, if you see your rankings drop over the next two weeks and if it is a sharper drop, it might be related to this update.

Best practices on links. Google’s Duy Nguyen published a blog post about link spam and best practices that you can read here.

Why we care. Again, if you see ranking declines in Google over the next two weeks, it might be related to this new link spam update. Make sure your links are natural and in accordance with Google’s webmaster guidelines. Work on improving your site, so it can naturally attract new links over time.

As Google wrote, “Site owners should make sure that they are following the best practices on links, both incoming and outgoing. Focusing on producing high-quality content and improving user experience always wins out compared to manipulating links. Promote awareness of your site using appropriately tagged links, and monetize it with properly tagged affiliate links.”

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

Categorized in Search Engine

If your website is not receiving enough organic traffic, launching a Google search campaign can give you more visits. Google Ads are commonly the first links listed in the search results. It can be tricky trying to understand how Google’s algorithm ranks ads, but luckily there are experts who have spent years studying this very topic.  

Google Ads can be in Display, Video, or Shopping formats as well. Depending on your business, one campaign may be a better fit than another. Search tends to be the most successful because people are using searching on computers and phones more than ever. If you perfect your search campaign, you’ll receive higher traffic and more customers!

Read on to learn tried-and-true tips to improve your Google search campaigns.  

Research Keywords First 

First off, you need to do the legwork and research your keywords before you even start a new Google Ads account. Along with your website’s quality score, the bids on your keywords determine where Google will rank your advertisement in the search results. Bidding on the best keywords for your business will lead to a higher Clickthrough Rate (CTR) and conversion rate.   

This is why extensively researching your keywords is crucial to a successful search campaign. You can create a broad and generic list of keywords based on your brand, but using research tools will help refine the list to be more specific.

Below are three tools experts use to determine which keywords work best:

  • Google’s Keyword Planner: This is a free tool that comes with your Google Ads account. The Keyword Planner displays the average number of times a term is searched every month. It also shows the competition level for each term, which helps you gauge whether to bid high or low. It’s best to bid on a relevant search term with a low competition level and a high average search. This can be a cheap keyword that will generate clicks and conversions. 
  • Google Trends: Another free tool, Google Trends can help you decide which keywords will perform better than others. You can see the popularity of a search term over time and by subregion. Google Trends also provides popular related topics and queries, which can give you some more ideas. If you’re stuck between two keywords and don’t know which to bid higher on, Google Trends also has an option to compare search terms.   
  • 3rd Party Tools: These are mostly used for SEO, but 3rd Party Tools can be valuable towards a search campaign. These tools expose the keywords your competitors are bidding on. This can help you decide how much to bid on and what keywords to use or not use. Spyfu and Ahrefs are reliable and expert-trusted options.  

Adapt Quickly 

There is no sure-fire way of predicting the traffic levels of your keywords before you launch. Google provides traffic estimates, but estimations aren’t always right. When you first launch your new Google Ads campaign, trust your research and be ready to adapt quickly.  

In the beginning, monitor your campaigns hourly. Tracking your CTR, conversion rate, and additional metrics will help you determine which keywords and ads are working well. You also need to monitor new campaigns to ensure you’re within your budget and the money is allocated properly.  

Create a Sensible Account Structure 

Account structure refers to how campaigns and keywords are grouped. If the structure of your account doesn’t make sense for your business, your search campaign will get messy very fast.  

To make account structures easier to understand, think of them as umbrellas. First is your Google Ads account, where you may have multiple campaigns (Search, Display, Shopping, etc.). Within each search campaign, you should have multiple ad groups. And lastly, an ad group consists of a keyword list and your ads.

Ad groups create the connection between keywords and ads. The ads in one ad group are of similar themes, so the same keywords are related to them. This organizes ideas and can help you see which ads and keywords perform better than others.  

Once you determine the best account structure for your business, don’t think of it as set-in-stone. Over time, different keywords may have higher conversion rates or a higher volume of traffic than others. Leaving room for your campaigns to grow as you receive more traffic allows you to add in keywords. 

 The last step is to write your ad copy, which I’ll talk more about below.  

Carefully Craft Headlines and Descriptions 

Your ad copy is the headline and description people read when they see your advertisement. You can have all the right keywords and bids, but if your headline is sloppy, people won’t click on it.  

To create a great headline, you need to think about the customer’s intent:

  • What are they searching for? 
  • Why are they clicking on your ad? 

The answers to these questions can help you write your headlines and descriptions.  

You also want to stand out from similar ads. If you run a cleaning service, your ad can blend in with all the other local cleaning services. Figure out what distinguishes your business from similar ones, and find a way to include it into your ad copy.  

If your ad receives more clicks, the chance of a conversion occurring is higher. Even better, if you have a high CTR, you will have a lower Cost per Click (CPC) and a higher quality score. Google ranks ads with higher quality scores above others, which will lead to more clicks and conversions. If you craft a great headline, everything else can improve along with it.   

Test different headlines and descriptions to see which works best for your audience. Sometimes the headline should be creative and attention-grabbing, while other times a more straightforward and informative ad copy is better. You won’t know unless you monitor your ads and adapt along the way.  

Read Through Search Terms Frequently 

Search terms are the words people type directly into the Google Search bar. When you first create your keyword list, you may be unsure which should be Exact, Broad, and Phrase match types. If you monitor search terms that lead to clicks on your ads, you can improve your keyword list and consequently increase your clicks. 

If you notice a specific search term is high in volume and causes a high conversion rate, you may want to make it an exact match type keyword. Sometimes, you may not think of search terms relevant to your ad until you start reading through a search term list. Checking the search terms often can help you refine your keyword list and rank your ads higher. 

Alternatively, if there are search terms you do not want to show up for, you can add these in as negative keywords. Once a search term is added as a negative keyword, your ad will no longer show for this term.

Final Thoughts 

Understanding Google’s algorithm and figuring out how to improve your ads’ performance can be confusing, but hopefully, these expert tips can help lead you in the right direction. A Google AdWords Consultant can help get your search campaign started or fix a messy campaign. If you’re creating a search campaign on your own, just be sure to do your research first and be prepared to monitor data and adapt along the way!  

[Source: This article was published in smallbiztrends.com By Lior Krolewicz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Rene Meyer]
Categorized in Search Techniques

Google has become such an integral part of all our lives that we now use the verb “google” to refer to the action of using the search engine. By simply typing a few keywords, you can find anything from the closest grocery store to the latest breaking news.

But sometimes, the magic of Google fails to give us the results we are searching for. You try several different word combinations and go deep into the search results but still can’t find what you need.

But there may be a solution to this! Did you know that Google provides different options to refine your search to find exactly what you want from thousands of matches?

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Use quotation marks to match exact phrases

"search query"

You can use quotation marks around a word or a phrase you enter into the search box to get a list of results that contain the exact search term.

If you search ‘When to use Node.js’ (sans quotation marks), Google returns a set of results that contains all four or less of these words in any order.
Syndi1.jpgRegular search.

But if you use quotation marks and search for “When to use Node.js” instead, Google gives priority to the results that contain this phrase exactly. 

Syndi2

Use AND/OR operators

When typing an inquiry with two or more words into the search bar, the results may only contain a few of the listed words.

javescript

keyword1 and keyword2

If you want to search for pages that contain both of these terms, you can use the AND operator in between the two words to specify that both of them should be in search results.

javascript1

keyword1 or keyword2

You can also use the OR operator to specify when you want the results to contain only one of the keywords. 

Syndi5

Searching with OR operator.

Exclude certain terms using minus sign

keyword1 -ignore

If you want to exclude web pages that contain a certain phrase from your search results, use the minus sign to indicate this in the search term.

When you search the word, ‘Ruby’, on Google, you get results related to Ruby programming language and Ruby gemstone.

Syndi6 Dual meaning words.

To exclude any results relating to the Ruby gemstone, you can search for ‘Ruby -gemstone’. Now, we get a list of results that are solely about the programming language.

Syndi7 Search excluding certain words.

Use wildcards in your search term

phrase * phrase

This trick is quite useful when looking for information and you are unsure of what exactly you are looking for. This trick is also useful for when you want to see how far down the Google algorithm rabbit hole you can go.

When you use an asterisk (*) in the search terms, this acts as a placeholder that Google automatically fills before delivering the results.

Let’s try the search term, ‘how to do * in Python‘, and see what Google decides to show us.
As you can see, the first three search results focus on three different things we can do with Python: doing math, commenting, and learning Python.

Syndi7Search excluding certain words.

Use wildcards in your search term

phrase * phrase

This trick is quite useful when looking for information and you are unsure of what exactly you are looking for. This trick is also useful for when you want to see how far down the Google algorithm rabbit hole you can go.

When you use an asterisk (*) in the search terms, this acts as a placeholder that Google automatically fills before delivering the results.

Let’s try the search term, ‘how to do * in Python‘, and see what Google decides to show us.
As you can see, the first three search results focus on three different things we can do with Python: doing math, commenting, and learning Python.

Syndi8

It’s an interesting way to allow Google to lead the way when you are unsure of the path you should take. 

Find websites similar to another website

This is a method that will become a constant in your googling habits as soon as you start using it!

How many times have you wondered if there was a way to discover another website similar to one of your favorite? If your answer is at least more than one, then you will love this technique.

To search for websites similar to another website, simply use a search syntax like this:

related:[website_url]

For example, let’s search for websites that are similar to GitHub with this syntax.

Syndi9

We can see Bitbucket, Git, Stack Overflow, and SourceForge show up on the results page. We receive these results because they serve a similar purpose to GitHub: repository management and developer communities.

Search for a specific webpage using Google

keyword1 site:[website_url]

Did you know that you can search for a specific webpage using Google? With this feature, you can find articles, blog posts, and pages published on a particular site. This is particularly useful when the site doesn’t have an in-built search feature available.

Let’s search the Live Code Stream website using the keyword, machine learning.

Syndi10

Find content in a specific file type

keyword1 filetype:[file type]

Let’s say you want to find PDFs or PowerPoint slides discussing a specific topic, Google will allow you to search for content only in this file type.

Let’s search for PowerPoint slides on the topic of algorithms using this method.

Syndi11

Use ‘before’ and ‘after’ operators

When you are searching for content that was published before a specific date, you should use the ‘before’ operator. You can provide a specific year or a complete date (in yyyy-mm-dd format) for this search term. 

keyword1 before:[date]

Syndi12

keyword1 after:[date]

Similarly, if you want to search for pages published after a certain date, use the ‘after’ operator with a specific year or date.

Syndi13

Use Google as a calculator

[mathematical operation]

Did you know that you can use Google’s search box as a calculator? When you are too lazy to grab your calculator (or the calculator app) to do some simple math operations, quickly turn to Google for support.

Syndi14

Using google as a simple calculator.

Syndi15

Gradually increase the words in your search term

Google recommends that you start a search with only the basic terms. For example, if you are trying to find courses for learning Javascript, start with the most basic phrase and gradually increase the number of words in your search term until you find what you are looking for.

  • Javascript courses
  • Javascript courses for beginners
  • Javascript courses for beginners udemy

Following this strategy has a few benefits. Using a broader search term first gives you the chance to get a bigger picture of the topic and the different avenues available. It also ensures that you don’t miss any important information by going straight to a refined, focused search term. As you add more words to the search term, you will see results that are more targeted to your specific request.

Use website language in your search terms

When you put search terms into the Google search box, try to use the kind of language websites use. Instead of using the search term, ‘my image doesn’t center on web page’, think of the kind of language websites use and search for centering images with CSS.

The trick here is not to search for the terms that you would use, but a professional website would. Especially, when you are going deep into a topic, using website language in the search term will give you better results.

Summary

Googling is technique developers have to master to efficiently find the information they want. So, we have provided you with a number of tips and tricks on how to refine your Google search skills. When you start using these tips correctly, you can reduce the amount of time you spend on Google and find the right answers to your queries.

Next time you start typing something into the Google search box, think of these tips and tricks and see which ones you can use without wasting any more time.

[Source: This article was published in thenextweb.com By Juan Cruz Martinez - Uploaded by the Association Member: Rene Meyer] 
Categorized in Search Techniques

Google has become so synonymous with the search that the company’s name has found its way into the dictionary as a verb—and all those times you’ve asked Google something can reveal a lot about your life, from the medical conditions you’ve been worried about, to where you’ve been on your vacations.

With so much sensitive data involved, you want to make sure that your search history is safe from prying eyes. There are ways to make extra sure that no one else can get a glimpse at what you’ve been searching for, and to block Google itself from knowing anything about your online queries.

Put a password on your Google search history

Google Search Password Option

Use extra verification on computers that other people have easy access to. David Nield

Your Google account is protected both by a password and two-factor authentication if you’ve switched that on (we recommend you do). That should minimize the risk of anyone else being able to log into your Google account and take a peek at what you’ve been searching for.

However, if you’re on a computer where you’re regularly logged into Google, your browser has your password saved, and other people (maybe housemates or colleagues) are likely to be wandering past, you might feel like an additional layer of security is required.

That’s perhaps why Google has introduced an extra password step just for your search history. Even if someone makes it to your Google account page, they’ll need your password to enter the search history section.

You can enable this by going to your Google account page, then clicking Data & personalization, Web & App Activity, Manage activity, and Manage my activity verification. Choose Require extra verification, then click Save.

Automatically delete your Google searches

Delete Google Search History

Google can clean up your search history after a set period of time. David Nield

Google will automatically clean up your search history if you want it to. Go to your Google account page, then click Data & personalization, Web & App Activity, and Auto-delete. On the next screen, you can delete search history data older than three months, 18 months, or 36 months.

If you choose Manage activity rather than Auto-delete, you can manually wipe everything you’ve ever searched for or just some of it. Use the search and filter options at the top to look for something specific, and either the Delete box at the top of the X buttons next to individual entries to erase what you want to erase.

Google has also added the option to delete just the last 15 minutes of your search history. For the time being, this is only available in the Google app for Android and iOS, though it should roll out to the web interface soon.

From inside the app, tap your profile picture (top right), then tap Delete last 15 min. You can also choose Search history instead, which gives you access to the screens we’ve already looked at. From here you can manually or automatically delete queries you’ve run through Google on the web.

Avoid Google entirely

Google Incognito Mode

Incognito mode keeps no record of your searches. David Nield

Another way to keep your Google search history private is not to allow Google to log it in the first place. If you open up an incognito or private window in your browser of choice before visiting Google and running your search, it won’t be recorded—as soon as you close the window, the browser (and Google) will forget the query ever happened.

In Google Chrome, for example, click the three dots in the top right-hand corner of the browser interface and choose New Incognito Window from the menu that appears. In Microsoft Edge, click the three dots (top right) then New InPrivate Window; in Firefox, click the three lines (top right), then New Private Window; and in Safari you can click File and New Private Window.

 

When you start off in an incognito or private browser window, you won’t be signed into any of your accounts, including your Google one. Make sure you don’t sign in to Google during the browsing session though—otherwise Google will log your search requests as normal, even if you’re using a private browsing mode.

You also have the option to run your web searches elsewhere: You can pick from Microsoft’s Bing or the privacy-focused DuckDuckGo, for instance. The developers behind the browser Brave have also launched a web search engine that you can try, which doesn’t track you or anything that you’re searching for.

Manage your browsing history and syncing

Clear Google Browsing Data

Your web browser has history clean-up options of its own. David Nield

If you use Chrome while signed in to your Google account, everything you search for on Google will be saved to the browser and your Google account. These lists of queries are one and the same, though the lists might be presented slightly differently. You can see your history in Chrome by clicking the three dots (top right) and then choosing History.

Having this setup also means you can delete your history from your browser as well as your Google account page on the web. From the History screen, you can select individual entries and then choose Delete, or click Clear browsing data for some more comprehensive options. Select Browsing history and the time period you want to cover, then select Clear data.

At the bottom of the dialog, you’ll see whether or not you’re signed into Google. If you want to clear the history in the local Chrome browser without affecting the history records in your Google account, you’ll need to sign out of Google first to break the sync—then repeat the steps that we’ve outlined above.

If you’re using a browser other than Chrome, you’ll have two separate search and browsing histories to think about: The one stored by Google and the one stored by your browser (unless you’re using private mode for all your searches). SafariEdge, and Firefox all have helpful options for clearing the history logged in your browser, across whatever time period you like, but you need to remember to run these wipes regularly.

[Source: This article was published in popsci.com By David Nield - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google said this launched in November, so it seems Google is November but is just announcing this now.

Google announced on Twitter that in November 2020 it has released an update to Google Image Search that reduces duplicative images in the image search results: “We made an improvement to Image Search to reduce duplicate images so that we can display others that are relevant yet visually distinct.”

Visually distinct. Google has said the images it shows are now more visually distinct from each other, providing a more diverse set of relevant images for your query.

Here are some screenshots Google embedded to convey the differences:

Screenshot google

November 2020. Google said in its announcement that this went live in November 2020, “we hope this improvement, which we introduced in November, helps everyone better make use of Google Images to be inspired and informed as they search visually.”

If your site gets a lot of Google Image Search traffic, you may want to check back at your analytics to November time to see if there were any substantial changes to your image search traffic.

Alternate meanings. Google added that it made improvements to the images and categories it uses for alternate meanings of words. The obvious example Google presented was the jaguar, which can be the animal, sports team, car manufacturer or others.

Google previously added a menu at the top to let you filter based on those alternate meanings and better narrow down the search results to what you are looking for.

Here are the examples of this:

google search liason

Why we care. If your site depends on Google Images for traffic, you may have already noticed changes to your traffic back in November. Either way, this update is from a few months back and Google is now just announcing that it went live. Hopefully, you fared well with this update.

Google launched it in order to provide a better set of diverse images for searchers when they use Google Image Search.

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Paul L.]
Categorized in Search Engine

Google Search Console is changing how Core Web Vitals are measured and reported on, which is likely to be a positive thing for site owners.

Going forward, the metrics defining the boundaries for largest contentful paint (LCP), first input delay (FID), and cumulative layout shift (CLS) are now defined as = (less than or equal to).

Previously the boundaries for each of the Core Web Vitals were defined as (less than).

That meant the Google Search Console report would only show a “good” rating if measurements were under the ideal thresholds.

Site owners can now achieve a “good” rating if measurements meet the ideal thresholds.

For example, an ideal measurement for LCP was previously defined as less than 2.5 seconds. If LCP was recorded at exactly 2.5 seconds then the site owner would see a “needs improvement” rating in Search Console.

That is no longer the case. Now that same site will receive a “good” rating.

Google’s changelog notes site owners will likely see positive changes as a result of this update: “Therefore you might see a change in statuses (for the better) in this report.”

To refresh everyone’s understanding of what it takes to meet Google’s Core Web Vitals thresholds, refer to the updated verbiage below:

  • Largest Contentful Paint: The time it takes for a page’s main content to load. An ideal LCP measurement is less than or equal to 2.5 seconds.
  • First Input Delay: The time it takes for a page to become interactive. An ideal measurement is less than or equal to 100 ms.
  • Cumulative Layout Shift: The amount of unexpected layout shift of visual page content. An ideal measurement is less than or equal to 0.1.

Now would be a good time to review the Core Web Vitals report in Search Console to see where your site stands.

The rollout of Core Web Vitals as a ranking factor is still months away, but it’s never to early to start preparing.

Core Web Vitals will become ranking signals in May 2021. Google’s John Mueller has hinted at the fact that thresholds for all three Core Web Vitals may need to be met in order to benefit from the ranking boost. To optimize for all three rather than one or two.

Sites that meet the threshold for all three Core Web Vitals may also receive a special badge in Google search results, communicating to searchers that the site provides an optimal user experience.

Whether Google will go through with rolling out a badge in search results is undetermined at this point. But it’s 100% confirmed Core Web Vitals will be ranking factors.

Expect more information from Google as we get closer to May.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne] 

Categorized in Search Engine

Did you know Google doesn't show everything? These alternative search engines help search the internet in a way Google won't.

Google is synonymous with searching the web, but did you know there's a lot that Google isn't showing you? Here are some alternative search engines to search the internet in a way Google won't.

There is nothing wrong with Google Search when it comes to finding web pages. But Google can't search within your computer and cloud accounts to find a file. Google also restricts itself to the language you've set. And why are we helping a corporation get bigger by handing over data in exchange for them earning ad revenue?

5 Search Engines to Find More Than What Google Shows

Break the habit and try one of these search engines instead.

1. Command E (Windows, macOS): Lightning Fast Search for Local Files and Online Apps

Command E might finally replace Everything and Spotlight as the fastest way to find any file on your computer. Available for both Windows and macOS, this universal search bar is lightning fast and hooks into oft-used cloud services.

Currently, Command E connects to accounts on Google Suite, Github, Slack, Salesforce, Jira, Zendesk, Notion, Hubspot, Asana, Figma, Evernote, Dropbox, Trello, and other popular online productivity suites. Once you've authorized access, give it a few minutes to index, and then fire up the console by pressing Command+E or Ctrl+E.

The console enables instant universal search across all accounts. Type a few characters and you'll start seeing results, changing on the fly as you type. It's super-fast, and a treat for keyboard warriors. All your data's file indexes are stored in an encrypted database on your computer, to quell privacy concerns. Try it out, you'll fall in love.

For download links to the Command E apps for Windows and macOS, you'll need to register on their website, which triggers the auto-download.

2. Million Short (Web): Search the Less Popular Results

google alternative search engine million short

Do your Google search results look a little too similar each time, as if the same websites keep showing up? Search engines prioritize big and popular sites. While that often gives good results, it also hides the serendipitous finds of gems in the deep recesses of the internet. Million Short wants to help you search these overlooked websites.

The idea of Million Short is to search by eliminating top sites. When you search any keyword, you have the option to remove the top 100, 1000, 10,000, 100K, or one million websites from the results. This will show you results that you wouldn't easily find on Google or other big search engines.

Million Short provides further filters to only show or fully remove e-commerce and live chat sites. You can also filter results by date and location. It's a fantastic way to find unique search results that others won't come across, which is especially useful when you're researching for an assignment or trying to make an impression with trivia.

3. Hopely (Web): Help Charities by Searching the Web

google alternative search engine hopely

Hopely is on a mission to help the world using an activity we all do every day: search the internet. The idea is so simple. Every search you do results in ad revenue for Hopely. The organization will keep half of that revenue, and donate the other half to charity. Can you imagine Google or Microsoft Bing promising that?

On the main page, you can choose which charity causes you'd like to support. The main organizations are Bread for the World, Doctors Without Borders, and the World Wildlife Fund. You can pick all three, or only the one you want to donate to.

The search results are not too different from what you'd get on Google or other pages. You can even sort results by images, videos, news, and maps. Hopely doesn't have additional filters though, like date, video length, type of site, image resolution and other options that you'd get on Google.

Still, for a basic regular search engine, Hopely does the job well enough to consider switching to it and helping the world. It's an excellent Google search alternative that feeds real people rather than large corporations. On the rare occasion that Hopely doesn't give you what you want, you can always Google it instead.

4. Sourceful (Web): Search and Discover Public Google Docs, Sheets, Slides

google alternative search engine sourceful

Google Docs gives you the option to make any Doc, Sheet, or Slide into a publicly viewable file on the internet. Sourceful finds these files and indexes them to make a library of public documents, which anyone can search.

You can refine the search by document, spreadsheet, or slideshow, and further sort results by Hot, Best, or New. There are a few popular search results already available to browse. For example, click "coronavirus" to find publicly available files about it, like trackers and statistics, toolkits and checklists, advisories and presentations, and more.

Sourceful users can also refine the description of each file, and add tags to make it easier to search. You can also comment on the results to start a discussion.

If you have an interesting file to share, whether your own or someone else's, add it to Sourceful.

5. 2Lingual (Web): Search in Two Languages Simultaneously

google alternative search engine 2lingual

The world speaks way more languages than English alone, and so does the internet. But when you Google search for an English keyword, you don't see pages in Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Hindi, and several other languages. 2Lingual is here to fix that, by searching in two languages simultaneously.

Powered by Google, you can select from a range of languages from Arabic to Vietnamese. The results appear side-by-side in two panes, which lets you see the difference between simple English results and how much more there is to the subject.

In most cases, you'll need to know how to read the second language as well. But if you're searching something regional, you could turn on "automatic query translation" and try to parse the results. You'll probably get better local insights that way.

Protect Your Privacy While Searching

Google and Bing are the leading search engines in the world, but both are notorious for how little they value your privacy. They track all your searches, use it to feed advertising, and you're never in control of where your data might finally end up.

There are a few other choices for search that protect their users. DuckDuckGo is the most famous name among them, with plenty of integrations across platforms. But you might want to also check out some of the other best privacy focused search engines if you're ready to dump Google for good.

[Source: This article was published in muo.com By Mihir Patkar - Uploaded by the Association Member: Paul L.]
Categorized in Search Engine

has become a platform for most people to find answers to their everyday queries. Whenever one needs or wants to know something, they google. However, many of the times, one does not get specific or relevant answers to the queries.

Nevertheless, this problem can be sorted by conducting some smart Google search tips. Here are a few of them:

1. Search using Google Scholar

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If you are into academic research, you need to go to Google Scholar and enter your queries in the search tab so that you find more scholarly and reliable sources of information.

2. Search using ‘+’ sign

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When one uses the ‘+’ sign (plus sign) before the keyword, this indicator firmly directs Google that s/he requires that keyword in every search result.

3. Search using ‘-‘ sign

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The use of ‘-‘ sign (minus) with some words commands Google that it is not required in the search results. For example, if one wants to search for the recipe of gluten-free bread, they can type ‘bread recipe-gluten’.

4. Search using quotation marks

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By the use of quotation marks (”  “), one directs Google to find the webpages which have those words written with quotation marks in the exact order of words and spelling of the words. One can use this tip while searching for books, lyrics of the songs, writers, etc.

5. Search using file type

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If one is looking for a particular file type, be it pdf or Word or PowerPoint or Excel, one can simply type ‘filetype:’ and mention the file type and search for the results. By being specific about the file type, you can find about 10 times fewer search results.

6. Search using an asterisk

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While searching, if one is confused about the spelling or does not know the particular word in a phrase or partly remembers something, one can use ‘*’  (asterisk sign) instead of that word. This way, Google will try to find that word and shows the search results accordingly.

7. Search using specific websites

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Some of the information one looks for can be found on a particular website only. For example, one has to go the official website of Nepal Rastra Bank to know the official forex rate in Nepal. In such case or in the case where one wants to find out about that word/phrase on one specific website, one can type ‘site:sitename.com’ along with the keyword.

8. Search using specific tabs

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There lie eight tabs (All, Images, News, Videos, Maps, More, Settings, and Tools) just below the Google search bar. One can narrow down their search result by using these tools. For example, if you are searching for some image, click on the ‘Images’ tab.

[Source: This article was published in english.onlinekhabar.com By Chaim Gartenberg - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez]
Categorized in Search Engine

Google detailed a host of new improvements at its “Search On” event that it will make to its foundational Google search service in the coming weeks and months. The changes are largely focused on using new AI and machine learning techniques to provide better search results for users. Chief among them: a new spell checking tool that Google promises will help identify even the most poorly spelled queries.

According to Prabhakar Raghavan, Google’s head of search, 15 percent of Google search queries each day are ones that Google has never seen before, meaning the company has to constantly work to improve its results.

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Part of that is because of poorly spelled queries. According to Cathy Edwards, VP engineering at Google, 1 in 10 search queries on Google are misspelled. Google has long tried to help with its “did you mean” feature that suggests proper spellings. By the end of the month, it’ll be rolling out a massive update to that feature, which uses a new spelling algorithm powered by a neural net with 680 million parameters. It runs in under three milliseconds after each search, and the company promises it’ll offer even better suggestions for misspelled words.

Another new change: Google search can now index individual passages from webpages, instead of just the whole webpage. For example, if users search for the phrase “how can I determine if my house windows are UV glass,” the new algorithm can find a single paragraph on a DIY forum to find an answer. According to Edwards, when the algorithm starts to roll out next month, it’ll improve 7 percent of queries across all languages.

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Google is also using AI to divide broader searches into subtopics to help provide better results (say, helping find home exercise equipment designed for smaller apartments versus just providing general workout gear information).

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Lastly, the company is also starting to use computer vision and speech recognition to automatically tag and divide videos into parts, an automated version of the existing chapter tools it already provides. Cooking videos, for example, or sports games can be parsed and automatically divided into chapters (something Google already offers to creators to do by hand), which can then be surfaced in search. It’s a similar effort to the company’s existing work in surfacing specific podcast episodes in search, instead of just showing the general feed.

[Source: This article was published in theverge.com By Chaim Gartenberg - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]
Categorized in Search Engine

Most of us use Google every day, but many have likely only scratched the surface of the search engine's power. Here's how to get better results from a Google search.

A product so ubiquitous that it spawned its own verb. Google accounts for 86 percent of the world's web searches, and thanks to the proliferation of smartphones, anyone can search for anything from anywhere—all you need is an internet connection. That means Google serves several billion searches a day.

It's easy to take for granted what a modern web search can do for you, but it's truly amazing how seamless Google has made the internet. Google can tell you the weather, translate languages, define words, give you directions, and do so much more. When was the last time you argued with friends over something and didn't check Google for the answer? 

23 Google Search Tips You'll Want to Learn

Even if you use Google multiple times a day, there's probably a lot you don't know about the search engine. If you've ever struggled to get the results you want, or just want to know a few inside tricks, the tips below will improve your Googling skills.

Google's search algorithm is remarkably adept at returning the information you are looking for—even when you aren't exactly sure yourself. But for those times when Google doesn't seem to be giving you exactly what you need, there are a few ways you can refine your search results.

Exclude terms with a minus (-) symbol: Want to exclude certain terms from your search results? Use the minus symbol to exclude all the terms you don't want, e.g. best apps -android for results that omit roundups of top Android apps.

Use quotations to search for the exact order: If you search for Patrick Stewart young, you will get results that have all those words, but not necessarily in the order you search. By adding quotations and searching "Patrick Stewart young" you will get only results that include all those words in that order.

Find one result or the other: If you're looking for results that are about one topic or another, but nothing else, use the OR modifier to get more accurate results. For example, searching apple microsoft will surface results relating to either term, but searching "apple OR microsoft" provides you with separate links about Apple and links about Microsoft.

Search operators change where Google searches. Instead of crawling the web at large, you'll find results from specific websites, web headings, and file types.

Search titles only: Use the search intitle: to look for words in the webpage title. For example Microsoft Bing intitle:bad will only return results about Microsoft Bing that have "bad" in the title. Conversely, allintitle: will only return links with multiple words in the title, i.e. allintitle: Google is faster than Bing.

Search File Types: If you're looking for a specific kind of file on the internet, use filetype: to search only for uploaded files that match your query. For example, use filetype:pdf to find a PDF or filetype:doc to locate a Microsoft Office document. You can find a comprehensive list of (occasionally obscure) searchable file types here.

For a comprehensive set of search modifiers and qualifiers, check out this guide.

Learn Google's Search Operators

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Search operators change where Google searches. Instead of crawling the web at large, you'll find results from specific websites, web headings, and file types.

A single website: If you want results from one specific website, use site: followed directly by the site URL you wish to use. You must include the site's domain, e.g. Google Photos tips site:pcmag.com, and not Google Photos tips site:pcmag.

Search titles only: Use the search intitle: to look for words in the webpage title. For example Microsoft Bing intitle:bad will only return results about Microsoft Bing that have "bad" in the title. Conversely, allintitle: will only return links with multiple words in the title, i.e. allintitle: Google is faster than Bing.

Search text only: intext: or allintext: allows you to only search in the text of a site, as opposed to the title and URL, which the search algorithm usually takes into consideration.

Search File Types: If you're looking for a specific kind of file on the internet, use filetype: to search only for uploaded files that match your query. For example, use filetype:pdf to find a PDF or filetype:doc to locate a Microsoft Office document. You can find a comprehensive list of (occasionally obscure) searchable file types here.

Search Related Websites: Search for similar websites by using the related: qualifier to show related results. Searching related:amazon.com brings up results including Walmart and Overstock. Searching related:google.com shows Yahoo and Bing. 

For a comprehensive set of search modifiers and qualifiers, check out this guide.

Set Google Search Result Time Restraints

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Looking for only the latest news about a subject or trying to find information relevant to a specific time frame? Use Google's search tools on desktop and mobile to filter your search results. After you conduct a search, click Tools on the top right and select Any time to open a drop-down menu to narrow results to hours, week, months, or a custom date range.

Perform an Advanced Google Image Search

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Google supports "backward" image searches on most browsers. This function allows you to upload an image file and find information on that image. For example, if you uploaded a picture of the Eiffel Tower, Google will recognize it and give you information on the Paris monument. It also works with faces, and can direct you to websites where the image appears, identify a work of art, or show you images that are "visually similar." 

Go to Google Images, where you can drag and drop an image into the image search bar, or click the camera icon to upload an image or enter an image's URL. (Here's how to do a reverse image search on your phone.)

Do Math in Your Google Search Box

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Whether you want to figure out a tip on a meal, or create a complex geographical rendering, Google search has you covered.

You can do basic calculations directly in the search bar. For example, searching 34+7 will prompt a calculator below the bar with the correct answer already filled in. You can also search 3 times 7 or 20% of $67.42 and receive the answer.

Super math nerds can create interactive 3D virtual objects (on desktop browsers that support WebGL) by plugging in an equation that uses "x" and "y" as free variables. Or plug in different numbers along with some cos(x)s, sin(y)s, and tan(x)s and see what renders.

If these more advanced math functions are something you can use for your everyday activities, Google has an in-depth, mathlete-level explainer here.

Use Google Search as a Converter

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Google will help you convert just about anything. You can search 38 Celsius in Fahrenheit, 10 ounces in pounds, and even 17.5 millimeters in light years. Not only will Google provide you with the answer, it will also provide an interactive conversion calculator for further converting.

Additionally, you can find up-to-date currency conversion rates with just a few keystrokes without needing to know the official currency symbol ($, €, etc.) or ISO designator (i.e. USD for the US dollar or GBP for the British pound). Google's algorithm is able to discern sentence-style queries to provide an answer, interactive chart, and a calculator for further conversions. 

For example, a search for 38 dollars in Iceland returns the answer that (as of Sept. 11, 2020) $38 was equal to 5,176.36 Icelandic króna. You can even search 1 bitcoin in dollars to find out it is worth $10,312.20.

Define Words in Google Search

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Ask Google search to define unfamiliar words (or two-word phrases) just by typing the word and define/definition. This will prompt Google to return a card with the definition, pronunciation, and—when available—a detailed etymology. Sometimes Google will define the word inside the autocomplete box before you press Search.

Track Packages in Google Search

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Google Voice Search

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To search by voice in your desktop browser, click the little microphone in the search box. This feature works much better on mobile devices, where the "OK, Google" trigger is more intuitive. If you ask basic questions, Google Assistant will even answer for you. This function is only supported in the Chrome browser at this time.

Search for the Time

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Calculating time difference is hard, so why not let Google do the work for you? Type time [any location], which could be the name of a country, city or (if it's in the US) a ZIP code, to return a card with the up-to-date local time of your search. It beats having to manually figure out how many hours ahead or behind you are.

Search for Sunrise and Sunset

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Want to know when the sun will rise or set in your neck of the woods? Search sunrise or sunset. You can also search for the sunrise/set times for other locations, as well.

Search for the Weather

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You can find out the weather in your area by simply searching weather—Google Autocomplete will even give you today's current forecast as you type. Conduct a search and Google will present an interactive card with weather information courtesy of The Weather Channel. 

By default, a search for weather will prompt an info card for the location of your IP address. However, you can also search weather [any location] to get the weather report for just about anywhere in the world, e.g. weather Toledo, OH or weather Kabul Afghanistan.

Real-Time Stock Quotes

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Type in any publicly traded company's ticker symbol and Google will present real-time price information on that company, e.g. GOOG (for Alphabet), AAPL (for Apple), or AMZN (for Amazon). Most of the larger exchanges are in real time, though Google offers a comprehensive disclaimer for which exchanges are on a delay.

Check Flight Times

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People may be flying less these days, but if you're headed to the airport or picking up a loved one, type in a flight number and Google will return a card with up-to-date times and terminal/gate information. If you're looking to book a flight, check out Google Flights to find the cheapest flights online.

Find Local Attractions

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If you're thinking about taking a trip, Google can help you find some interesting sights to see. Google any city or country you're thinking about visiting, and Google should include a series of Top Sights cards near the top of the search results. If you're searching for a city, click "More things to do." If you're searching for a country, click the travel guide button that Google provides. 

You will be taken to Google's travel page for that city or country, allowing you to see places to visit, popular food to try, suggested trips, and relevant travel articles. Additional tabs allow you to see flights, hotels, and rentals.

Shop With Google

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If you hate shopping and searching through several different websites to find what you need, use Google instead. Type in your search and click the Shopping tab to find images of what you want from different stores across the internet. Filter results further, if necessary, and when you're ready to make a purchase, click a listing to be taken directly to the store's webpage.

Track Google Results With Google Trends

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Ever wonder what other people are searching for? Google Trends allows anyone to see trending Google results and compare search terms. While it's primarily used by professionals, it can also be fun to see what topics are the most popular in your area. View search data, compare trending topics, view visualization maps, explore trending topics, review results from past years, and subscribe to specific search results.

Play Games in Google Search

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Google has a host of built-in games and tools you can access by Googling them, including Pac-Man, tic tac toe, Solitaire, Minesweeper, and Snake. Search flip a coin and Google will do it for you; same thing with a die or spinner. Google also has a built-in calculator, metronome, breathing exercise, and a color picker that provides the Hex Code and Decimal Code for any shade. 

Filter Explicit Content

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Have a kid using the computer? Protect them from explicit content with Google's SafeSearch feature. By opening Settings and selecting Turn on SafeSearch, you can filter out any explicit links, images, or video that may be deemed inappropriate for an all-ages audience. While Google admits it is not a 100 percent fix, it's a good start. (For a more robust solution, check out our picks for the Best Parental Control Software.)

Let Google Search for You

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With Google Alerts, you can create custom alerts that will notify you any time a new page is published containing your selected keywords. Create an Alert by first selecting an email address where these results will be sent, then add topics to track. Type in what you're looking for and Google will show you what the alert will look like with existing stories already indexed by the search engine. Choose how often you receive an update, the sources included, and a few other limitations.

I'm Feeling Something Else

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Remember Google's "I'm Feeling Lucky" button? Type in a search term and click I'm Feeling Lucky to be immediately taken to the first search result. It's a good way to save time when you know exactly what you're looking for. However, Google has added a new wrinkle that can help you find something else. 

Before you type anything into Google, hover over the I'm Feeling Lucky button and the wording will change. It may change to "I'm Feeling Adventurous," which will provide you with a coin to flip. "I'm Feeling Hungry" will Google nearby restaurants. "I'm Feeling Trendy" will show you recent Google trends. Every day there are new suggestions with different results.

Google Search Easter Eggs

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As we've detailed in the past, Google's engineers apparently have a lot of extra time on their hands with which to implement all manner of Easter eggs and April Fool's pranks. And why should Google's main raison d'etre be left out of the fun? Here are just a few cool Easter Eggs you can uncover through search.

  • "askew" will tilt your screen 
  •  Festivus" adds a Festivus pole to the left side of the screen
  • "do a barrel roll" or "z or r twice" will cause the screen to do a 360
  • "Google in 1998" will make the page appear as Google did in 1998

 [Source: This article was published in pcmag.com By Jason Cohen- Uploaded by the Association Member: Jennifer Levin]
Categorized in Search Engine
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