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Google holds over 92% market share in the search engine and also comes as a default option on Mac. However, if you find your Mac changing the search engine from Google to Yahoo, then that's a problem worth fixing. If your Mac is the affected one by the search engine change, read along to learn how to to change the search engine from Yahoo to Google on Mac.

Yahoo search results are mostly inferior to Google, and you would want to use Google to get things done. The main reason behind the search engine change is the browser hijacking code or extensions.

Browser hijackers are a threat to millions of users. Some browsers are more affected by them, while there are a few exceptions.

Those in a habit of downloading PUAs (Potentially Unwanted Applications) are more vulnerable to browser hijackers. We will explain how to change the search engine from Yahoo to Google on Safari and Google Chrome.

1. CHANGE THE DEFAULT SEARCH ENGINE IN SAFARI

On paper, the Safari browser is more secure than Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge. You can easily change the search engine from Yahoo to Google from the browser. Here’s how.

Step 1: Open Safari browser on Mac.

Step 2: Click on the Safari name in the menu bar.

Step 3: Select the Preferences menu.

prefrence step3

Step 4: Go to Search > Search Engine and select Google from the drop-down menu.

2. CHANGE DEFAULT SEARCH ENGINE IN CHROME

Those using Google Chrome as the default browser on Mac can change the search engine from the Settings menu. Follow the steps below to change the search engine from Yahoo to Google in Google Chrome.

Step 1: Open Google Chrome on Mac.

Step 2: Click on the three-dot menu at the top and go to Settings.

step 2

Step 3: Select the Search engine from the left sidebar and select Google from the main menu.

That's it. You have successfully changed the search engine from Yahoo to Google on Mac's Safari and Google Chrome browser.

On Google Chrome, if you are still facing search engine automatically switching from Google to Yahoo, try using other tricks below.

3. DISABLE CHROME EXTENSIONS

Apple verifies every Safari extension and distributes only valid extensions from the Mac App Store. That’s not the case with Google Chrome though.

Extensions play an important role in the Chrome ecosystem. However, not every extension is actively maintained and could be out of date. Some malicious extensions might take over your Chrome home page and change the search engine to Yahoo.

It can be difficult to pinpoint a single extension. You can disable all the Chrome extensions and move back to Google.

Step 1: Open Google Chrome and click on the three-dot menu at the top.

Step 2: Go to More Tools > Extensions.

More Tools

Step 3: From the Extension menu, click on the Remove button or disable the extension for Chrome.

4. RESET CHROME SETTINGS

A wrong setting tweak in the Chrome browser may leave you with Yahoo search engine as the default option. Google Chrome offers a handy option to reset Chrome settings on the go. Here’s how to use it.

Step 1: Open Chrome and go to Settings.

Step 2: Select the Advanced option.

Step 3: Select Restore settings.

Step 4: Click on Restore settings to their original default option.

reset setting

Step 5: Press the Reset settings button to confirm your decision.

This will reset your startup page, new tab page, search engine, and pinned tabs. It will also disable all extensions and clear temporary data like cookies.

Your bookmarks, history, and saved passwords won’t be cleared.

TIPS FOR SAFE BROWSING ON MAC

Apple calls the Mac a potential threat to security due to its open nature. Unlike on iOS, anyone can go ahead and install apps from the web. This puts the user at risk of installing unverified apps from the web. Follow the tips below to make sure to create a safe environment on the Mac.

  • Try to verify if the app you want to download is available from the Mac App Store.
  • If the app isn’t available from the App Store, use the official website to download the app file.
  • If the website looks suspicious to you, scan the web address with VirusTotal and make sure it doesn’t contain any malicious files.
  • Try out CleanMyMac X that scans for corrupt files in the background, and removes them periodically.

USE GOOGLE ON MAC

Using Yahoo as a search is surely a pain for Mac users. It is a headache, especially when you don’t know what’s going around and how the OS changes the search engine without your permission. By following the steps above, you can take care of those browser hijackers and go back to using Google as the main search engine on Mac.

[Source: This article was published in guidingtech.com By Parth Shah - Uploaded by the Association Member: Deborah Tannen]
Categorized in Search Engine

Auto deletes are also rolling out to Google Accounts now.

Google is rolling out new privacy-focused features for those who sign into search with a Google Account.

Now, in the Google Account Menu, there's a new "quick delete" option on the Google mobile app that deletes the last 15 minutes of search history with a tap of a button. The option is viewable by tapping the avatar icon and selecting "Delete last 15 minutes".

Google announced the feature at its IO 2021 conference this May. It's a mobile-only option and is available now in the Google iOS app and is coming to the Android Google app "later this year", says Google

It offers users a simple two-click option to get rid of anything in their search history that a person might want to delete as soon as the mobile search has been completed. 

Google Search web users, meanwhile, are gaining "auto-delete" controls that let people choose to automatically and continuously delete their search history at specified intervals. Users can instruct Google to purge Web & App Activity from an account after three, 18, or 36 months. 

Google says that enabling Web & App Activity allows it to tailor the experience across Google services by saving search history. This history can be deleted from the My Activity section of user settings. 

Catering to people who share a device with family or friends, Google now lets users lock their My Activity page. Protecting this section of the account requires a password or two-factor authentication to view the records of a user's search history.

Another key privacy feature Google announced at I/O was the ability to passcode-protect a Locked Folder in the Photos app. 

This lets phone owners hand a device to a friend to show a photo on the camera roll without having to worry the person scrolls down to a sensitive pic. This rolled out to Pixel devices in August and is coming to other Android devices this year. 

quick delete max

[Source: This article was published in zdnet.com By Liam Tung - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson]
Categorized in Search Engine

Google has become so synonymous with the search that the company’s name has found its way into the dictionary as a verb—and all those times you’ve asked Google something can reveal a lot about your life, from the medical conditions you’ve been worried about, to where you’ve been on your vacations.

With so much sensitive data involved, you want to make sure that your search history is safe from prying eyes. There are ways to make extra sure that no one else can get a glimpse at what you’ve been searching for, and to block Google itself from knowing anything about your online queries.

Put a password on your Google search history

Google Search Password Option

Use extra verification on computers that other people have easy access to. David Nield

Your Google account is protected both by a password and two-factor authentication if you’ve switched that on (we recommend you do). That should minimize the risk of anyone else being able to log into your Google account and take a peek at what you’ve been searching for.

However, if you’re on a computer where you’re regularly logged into Google, your browser has your password saved, and other people (maybe housemates or colleagues) are likely to be wandering past, you might feel like an additional layer of security is required.

That’s perhaps why Google has introduced an extra password step just for your search history. Even if someone makes it to your Google account page, they’ll need your password to enter the search history section.

You can enable this by going to your Google account page, then clicking Data & personalization, Web & App Activity, Manage activity, and Manage my activity verification. Choose Require extra verification, then click Save.

Automatically delete your Google searches

Delete Google Search History

Google can clean up your search history after a set period of time. David Nield

Google will automatically clean up your search history if you want it to. Go to your Google account page, then click Data & personalization, Web & App Activity, and Auto-delete. On the next screen, you can delete search history data older than three months, 18 months, or 36 months.

If you choose Manage activity rather than Auto-delete, you can manually wipe everything you’ve ever searched for or just some of it. Use the search and filter options at the top to look for something specific, and either the Delete box at the top of the X buttons next to individual entries to erase what you want to erase.

Google has also added the option to delete just the last 15 minutes of your search history. For the time being, this is only available in the Google app for Android and iOS, though it should roll out to the web interface soon.

From inside the app, tap your profile picture (top right), then tap Delete last 15 min. You can also choose Search history instead, which gives you access to the screens we’ve already looked at. From here you can manually or automatically delete queries you’ve run through Google on the web.

Avoid Google entirely

Google Incognito Mode

Incognito mode keeps no record of your searches. David Nield

Another way to keep your Google search history private is not to allow Google to log it in the first place. If you open up an incognito or private window in your browser of choice before visiting Google and running your search, it won’t be recorded—as soon as you close the window, the browser (and Google) will forget the query ever happened.

In Google Chrome, for example, click the three dots in the top right-hand corner of the browser interface and choose New Incognito Window from the menu that appears. In Microsoft Edge, click the three dots (top right) then New InPrivate Window; in Firefox, click the three lines (top right), then New Private Window; and in Safari you can click File and New Private Window.

 

When you start off in an incognito or private browser window, you won’t be signed into any of your accounts, including your Google one. Make sure you don’t sign in to Google during the browsing session though—otherwise Google will log your search requests as normal, even if you’re using a private browsing mode.

You also have the option to run your web searches elsewhere: You can pick from Microsoft’s Bing or the privacy-focused DuckDuckGo, for instance. The developers behind the browser Brave have also launched a web search engine that you can try, which doesn’t track you or anything that you’re searching for.

Manage your browsing history and syncing

Clear Google Browsing Data

Your web browser has history clean-up options of its own. David Nield

If you use Chrome while signed in to your Google account, everything you search for on Google will be saved to the browser and your Google account. These lists of queries are one and the same, though the lists might be presented slightly differently. You can see your history in Chrome by clicking the three dots (top right) and then choosing History.

Having this setup also means you can delete your history from your browser as well as your Google account page on the web. From the History screen, you can select individual entries and then choose Delete, or click Clear browsing data for some more comprehensive options. Select Browsing history and the time period you want to cover, then select Clear data.

At the bottom of the dialog, you’ll see whether or not you’re signed into Google. If you want to clear the history in the local Chrome browser without affecting the history records in your Google account, you’ll need to sign out of Google first to break the sync—then repeat the steps that we’ve outlined above.

If you’re using a browser other than Chrome, you’ll have two separate search and browsing histories to think about: The one stored by Google and the one stored by your browser (unless you’re using private mode for all your searches). SafariEdge, and Firefox all have helpful options for clearing the history logged in your browser, across whatever time period you like, but you need to remember to run these wipes regularly.

[Source: This article was published in popsci.com By David Nield - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]

Categorized in Search Engine

Pro-privacy browser Brave, which has been testing its own brand search engine for several months — operating a waitlist where brave (ha!) early adopters could kick the tires of an upstart alternative in internet search — has now launched the tool, Brave Search, in global beta.

Users interested in checking out Brave’s non-tracking search engine, which is built on top of an independent index and touted as a privacy-safe alternative to surveillance tech products like Google search, will find it via Brave’s desktop and mobile browsers. It can also be reached from other browsers via search.brave.com — so doesn’t require switching to Brave’s browser to use.

Brave Search is being offered as one of the multiple search options that users of the company’s eponymous browser can pick from (including Google’s search engine). But Brave says it will make it the default search in its browser later this year.

As we reported back in March, the company acquired technology and developers who had previously worked on Cliqz, a European anti-tracking search-browser combo that closed down in May 2020 — building on a technology they’d started to develop, called Tailcat, to form the basis of the Brave-branded search engine.

The (now beta) search engine has been tested by more than 100,000 “early access users” at this point, per Brave. It’s made this video ad to tout its “all in one” alternative to Google search + Chrome.

The company recently passed 32 million monthly active users (up from 25 million back in March) for its wider suite of products — which, as well as its flagship pro-privacy browser, includes a newsreader Firewall+VPN service.

Brave also offers privacy-preserving Brave Ads for businesses wanting to reach its community of privacy-preferring users.

Growing public awareness of surveillance-based business models has been building momentum for pro-privacy consumer tech for a number of years. And several players which started out with a strong focus on one particular pro-privacy product (such as a browser, search engine, or email) have been expanding into a full suite of products — all under the same non-tracking umbrella.

As well as Brave, there’s the likes of DuckDuckGo — which offers non-tracking search but also a tracker blocker and an email inbox protector tool, among other products, and reckons it now has between 70 million-100 million users overall; and Proton, the maker of E2E-encrypted email service ProtonMail but also a cloud calendar and file storage as well as a VPN. The latter recently confirmed passing 50 million users globally.

There is also Apple itself too, of course — a Big Tech giant that competes with Google and the adtech complex by promising users a privacy premium to drive sales of its hardware and services. (At the start of this year Apple said there are now over 1 billion iOS users globally — and more than 1.65 billion Apple devices.)

Tl;dr: The market for privacy consumer tech is growing.

Still, even Apple doesn’t try to compete against Google search, which perhaps underlines the scale of the challenge involved in trying to poach users from the search behemoth. (Albeit, Apple extracts massive payments from Google to preload the latter’s search engine onto iOS devices — which does conflict with [and complicate] its wider, pro-privacy, pro-user promises while also adding a nice revenue boost for Apple… ).

DuckDuckGo has, by contrast, been at the non-tracking search coalface for years — and turning a profit since 2014. Though clearly not in the same profit league as Apple. But, more recently, it’s also taken in rare tranches of external funding as its investors spy growing opportunities for private search.

Other signs of expanding public appetite to protect people’s information from commercial snoopers include the surge of usage for E2E-encrypted alternatives to Facebook-owned WhatsApp — such as Signal — which saw a download spike earlier this year after the advertising giant announced unilateral changes to WhatsApp’s terms of service.

Credible players that have amassed a community of engaged users around a core user privacy promise are well-positioned to ride each new wave of privacy interest — and cross-sell a suite of consumer products where they’ve been able to expand their utility. Hence Brave believing the time is right for it to dabble in search.

Commenting in a statement, Brendan Eich, CEO, and co-founder of Brave said: “Brave Search is the industry’s most private search engine, as well as the only independent search engine, giving users the control and confidence they seek in alternatives to Big Tech. Unlike older search engines that track and profile users and newer search engines that are mostly skin on older engines and don’t have their own indexes, Brave Search offers a new way to get relevant results with a community-powered index, while guaranteeing privacy. Brave Search fills a clear void in the market today as millions of people have lost trust in the surveillance economy and actively seek solutions to be in control of their data.”

Brave touts its eponymous search offering as having a number of differentiating features versus rivals (including smaller rivals) — such as its own index, which it also says gives it independence from other search providers.

Why is having an independent index important? We put that question to Josep M. Pujol, chief of search at Brave, who told us: “There are plenty of incentives for censorship and biases, either by design, or what is even more difficult to combat, unintentional. The problem of search, and how people access the web, is that it is a mono-culture, and everybody knows that while it’s very efficient, it’s also very dangerous. A single disease can kill all the crops. The current landscape is not fail-tolerant, and this is something that even users are becoming aware of. We need more choices, not to replace Google or Bing, but to offer alternatives. More choices will entail more freedom and also get back to real competition, with checks and balances.

“Choice can only be achieved by being independent, as if we do not have our own index, then we are just a layer of paint on top of Google and Bing, unable to change much or anything in the results for users’ queries. Not having your own index, as with certain search engines, gives the impression of choice, but in reality, such engine ‘skins’ are the same players as the big two. Only by building our own index, which is a costly proposition, will we be in a position to offer true choice to the users for the benefit of all, whether they are Brave Search users or not.”

Although, for now, it’s worth noting that Brave is relying on some provision from other search providers — for specific queries and in areas like image search (where, for example, it says it’s currently fetching results from Microsoft-owned Bing) — to ensure its results achieve adequate relevancy.

Elsewhere it also says it’s relying upon anonymized contributions from the community to improve and refine results — and is seeking to live up to wider transparency claims vis-à-vis the search index (which it also claims has “no secret methods or algorithms to bias results”; and for which it will “soon” be offering community-curated open ranking models to ensure diversity and prevent algorithmic biases and outright censorship”).

In another transparency step, Brave is reporting the percentage of users’ queries that are independent by showing what it bills as “the industry’s first search independence metric” — meaning it displays the ratio of results coming exclusively from its own index.

“It is derived privately using the user’s browser as we do not build user profiles,” Brave notes in a press release. “Users can check this aggregate metric to verify the independence of their results and see how results are powered by our own index, or if third-parties are being used for long-tail results while we are still in the process of building our index.”

It adds that Brave Search will “typically be answering most queries, reflected by a high independence metric”. Although if you’re performing an image search, for example, you’ll see the independence metric take a hit (but Brave confirms this will not result in any tracking of users).

Transparency] is a key principle at Brave, and there will also be a global independence metric for Brave Search across all searches, which we will make publicly available to show how we are progressing towards complete independence,” it adds.

 

On the monetization side, Brave says it will “soon” be offering both a paid ad-free version of search in the future and an ad-supported free version — while still pledging “fully anonymous” search. Though it specifies that it won’t be flipping the ad switch during the early beta phase.

“We will offer options for both ad-free paid search and ad-supported free search later,” it notes. “When we are ready, we will explore bringing private ads with BAT revenue share to search, as we’ve done for Brave user ads.”

Users of the search engine who do not also use Brave’s own browser will be served contextual ads.

“In Brave Search via the browser, strong privacy guarantees for opt-in ads are a norm and a brand value that we uphold,” adds Pujol, confirming that users of its search and browser are likely to get the same type of ad targeting.

Asked about the pricing of the forthcoming ad-free version of the search engine he says: “Although we have not finalized the launch date or the price yet, our ad-free paid search will be affordable because we believe search, and access to information, should be available on fair terms for everyone.”

In an interesting recent development in Europe, Google — under pressure from antitrust regulators — has agreed to ditch a pay-to-play auction model for the choice screen it offers regional users of its Android platform, letting them pick a default search engine from a list with a number of rivals and its own brand Google search. The move should expand the number of alternative search engines to which Android users in Europe are exposed — and could help chip away at some of Google’s search market share.

Brave previously told us it would not participate in Google’s paid auction — but Pujol says that if the new model is “truly free to participate” it will likely take part in the future.

“Google and free-to-participate seem difficult to believe, given plenty of precedents but if this model is indeed truly free to participate, without contracts or nondisclosure agreements, then we would likely participate,” he says. “After all, Brave Search is open to everyone who would like to use it, and we are open and happy to put Brave Search on any platform.”

“We have localized browsers throughout the European market, so in addition to growth via the Brave browser growing, we intend to grow Brave Search’s usage by marketing our best-in-class privacy on all media that reach prospective users,” he adds.

[Source: This article was published in techcrunch.com By Natasha Lomas - Uploaded by the Association Member: Martin Grossner]
Categorized in Search Engine

Google is now letting its user's password protect the Web & App Activity page. It contains the histories of the web search with the Google Maps usage. A password can now prevent the activity of a user from having easy access by other people who are using the same device.

Google lets its user's password to protect their search history

The Web & App Activity page contains a lot of private data. Moreover, to the activity in the Search and Maps, track all your YouTube watch history. Also, it tracks the Google Play Usage, Google Assistant queries, and many more.

This data is usually helpful for those users who look back while trying to retrace how they found something. But the reason behind why Google tracks it is to serve the search results and ads with personalized suggestions.

Also, for the first time, users can prevent their data from getting the view from those people who should not see it. Previously those who wanted to see someone’s search history had to pick up their device and type activity.google.com from the address bar.

With this new verification option, users can easily set a password that will need to be entered before anyone views the Web & App Activity page. First, they have to log into your Google account. Then they can navigate to your activity.google.com. After that, one has to click on Manage My Activity verification. Then they have to click on the Require Extra Verification and Save. The next one has to enter the users password to confirm the identity.

As you have successfully protected your activity page, you will be able to see a Verify button in a historic place. Clicking on that button will take you to a screen. There you have to enter your account password. It will then take you to the activity page, where your fill history is visible. Google is also offering multiple ways to manage your activity history. From the top of the page, there is a row of buttons to toggle the data collection off and on.

[Source: This article was published in flipweb.org By Ishita Paul - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]
Categorized in Search Techniques

Artificial Intelligence offers "unprecedented potential to revolutionize" spam fighting. Blocks estimated 99% of spam from search results

Google announced the introduction of new artificial intelligence (AI) tools to help fight against a range of spam. Internal estimate calculates that the AI has the ability to block 99% of spam.

Unprecedented Potential to Fight Spam

There are multiple forms of spam that Google fights at different points in which Google interacts with web pages.

What Google has done is to create a spam-fighting artificial intelligence that Google describes as providing an “unprecedented potential to revolutionize” spam fighting.

Google specially focused its spam-fighting algorithms on sensitive searches that were especially important to users like those related to important topics like finding medical testing sites.

“By combining our deep knowledge of spam with AI, last year we were able to build our very own spam-fighting AI that is incredibly effective at catching both known and new spam trends.

For example, we have reduced sites with auto-generated and scraped content by more than 80% compared to a couple of years ago.”

Hacked Site Spam

Spammers will hack a site and add new pages with links to other sites. A widespread site hack that Google warns about is called the Japanese keyword hack because it adds Japanese language pages. It can also take over your Google search console account.

Google claimed to have caught “most” spam generated by site hacking. AI technology was able to increase Google’s ability to catch it by over 50%.

Three Areas Where Google Blocks Spam

Google published a diagram outlining three levels at which it encounters spam, diagnoses it as spam, and then rejects it.

Illustration: Three Area Where Google Blocks Spam

Diagram illustrating where Google AI blocks spam

Where Google Blocks Spam

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See all your organic keywords in GA and their specific performance metrics. Free Trial. Cancel anytime. Professional support. 4-minute setup.

  1. Crawled Spam
  2. Indexed Spam
  3. Spam Caught by Manual Action

Spam Blocked Before Making it to the Index

Google’s crawler (GoogleBot) is software that crawls the Internet to find web pages to include within Google’s search index in order to show those pages in search results.

The crawler itself can catch spam as it encounters it so that the spam doesn’t make it to the index.

Spam added through the Search Console Request Indexing tool is also caught and discarded before it is included in Google’s search index.

Spam in Search Index Blocked Before it is Ranked

These systems don’t catch all the spam and some spam makes it into Google’s search index. Whenever Google responds to a search query Google will scan web pages that are being considered for ranking in order to find more spam.

Spammy pages that are found at this level are used to create better spam-fighting algorithms at the web crawling level.

Where Manual Actions Come From

Google claims that these systems block 99% of spam from reaching users. What makes it through is culled through manual actions.

“We estimated that these automated systems help keep more than 99% of visits from Search completely spam-free.

As for the tiny percentage left, our teams take manual action and use the learnings from that to further improve our automated systems.”

Review Site Spam

Google added low-quality reviews and shopping sites to the list of sites that are analyzed by their AI tools. Google says it wants to reward content that is in-depth and useful.

“…we wanted to make sure that you’re getting the most useful information for your next purchase by rewarding content that has more in-depth research and useful information.”

Google Spam Fight Enhanced by AI

The AI tools were added sometime in 2020. It’s unclear how much this may have influenced search results but some sites may have received better rankings because of the removal of spam sites that were previously high ranking.

It’s difficult to say from our side how successful Google’s spam fight is. Everyone has an anecdote about a spam site that is getting away with ranking on Google.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Roger Montti - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon] 
Categorized in Search Engine

Google and Microsoft Bing are the largest search engines that satisfy users' informational needs every day. Let's explore a detailed comparison of the two here.

When it comes to optimizing a website, SEO professionals typically focus on Google. After all, it’s the world’s most popular search engine.

But what about Microsoft Bing? Is it worth optimizing your site for, as well?

Let’s see how these two search giants, Microsoft Bing (rebranded from simply ‘Bing’ in October 2020) and Google, compare.

Google vs. Microsoft Bing Market Share

One of the first distinctions between Microsoft Bing and Google is market share. According to Statista, in February 2021, Bing accounted for 6.7% of the global search market, while Google took 86.6%.

That’s pretty huge.

And while that may make it tempting to focus on Google alone, Microsoft Bing provides good conversions and has a user base that shouldn’t be ignored.

That 6.7% of search users accounts for millions who use Microsoft Bing every day.

It’s particularly important to optimize for Bing if you’re targeting an American audience. In fact, one-third of online queries in the U.S. are powered by Microsoft properties when you factor in Yahoo and voice searches.

Some have wondered over the years whether Bing is an acronym for “Because It’s Not Google.” I’m not sure how true that is, but the name does come from a campaign in the early 1990s for its predecessor, Live Search.

Another fun tidbit is that Ahrefs recently did a study on the Top 100 Bing searches globally and the #1 query searched was [Google].

Comparing Google vs. Microsoft Bing’s Functionality

From a search functionality perspective, the two search engines are similar, but Google offers more core features:

Feature Google  Microsoft Bing
Text Search Yes Yes
Video Search Yes Yes
Image Search Yes Yes
Maps Yes Yes
News Yes Yes
Shopping Yes Yes
Books Yes No
Flights Yes No
Finance Yes No
Scholarly Literature Yes No

How Google & Microsoft Bing Differ in Size of Index and Crawling

Google says:

“The Google Search index contains hundreds of billions of webpages and is well over 100,000,000 gigabytes in size.”

Even so, not even Google can crawl the entire web. That is just not going to happen.

This is why using structured data is so important. It provides a data feed about your content so Google can understand it better, which can help you qualify for rich results and get more clicks and impressions.

Microsoft Bing hasn’t released similar figures. However, this search engine index size estimating website puts the Microsoft Bing index at somewhere between 8 to 14 billion web pages.

The two engines have shared a little about their approaches to web indexing.

Microsoft Bing says:

“Bingbot uses an algorithm to determine which sites to crawl, how often, and how many pages to fetch from each site. The goal is to minimize bingbot crawl footprint on your web sites while ensuring that the freshest content is available.”

Around the same time the above statement was made, John Mueller from Google said:

“I think the hard part here is that we don’t crawl URLs with the same frequency all the time. So some URLs we will crawl daily. Some URLs maybe weekly. Other URLs every couple of months, maybe even every once half year or so. So this is something that we try to find the right balance for, so that we don’t overload your server.”

Google has a mobile-first index, while Microsoft Bing takes a different stance and does not have plans to apply a mobile-first indexing policy.

Instead, Microsoft Bing maintains a single index that is optimized for both desktop and mobile, so it is important to make sure your site experience is optimized, loads quickly, and gives users what they need.

Google has evolved into more than just a search engine with products like Gmail, Maps, Chrome OS, Android OS, YouTube, and more.

Microsoft Bing also offers email via Outlook, as well as other services like Office Online or OneDrive.

Unlike Google, however, it does not have its own operating system. Instead, it uses Windows Phone 8 or iOS on Apple devices.

Now, let’s take a look at where Bing is on par with Google – or superior.

Differences in User Interface & Tools

Google has a clean, simple interface that many people find easy to use.

bitcoin 1

So does Microsoft Bing, though; in my opinion, Bing is actually a little bit more visual.

Both search engines display useful information about related searches, images, companies, and news and do a great job of informing users of everything they need to know about a given topic.

Microsoft Bing seach

SEO professionals love our tools and data.

Thankfully, both Google and Microsoft Bing have decent keyword research tools that offer insights into performance:

bing kwr

One area where I think Google falls behind is the data it provides in Google Search Console. If you want to learn how to use it, check out How to Use Google Search Console for SEO: A Complete Guide.

One of the cool feature sets in Microsoft Bing is the ability to import data from Google Search Console:

bing wmt 60632365848fb

Another Microsoft Bing feature that I think beats Google is the fact that it provides SEO Reports.

According to Bing, these reports contain common page-level recommendations based on SEO best practices to improve your rankings.

The reports are automatically generated biweekly and provide tips as to what to work on or look into.

bing seo report

See A Complete Guide to Bing Webmaster Tools to learn more.

Microsoft Bing May Excel in Image Search Over Google

When it comes to image search, Microsoft Bing may have a leg up on Google by providing higher-quality images.

I like the filtering features in its image search, too, because you can turn titles off and search by image size, color, or type.

bing-pizza-606323628ed23.png

Test out Bing Visual Image Search, which allows you to do more with images. Check out its library of specialized skills to help you shop, identify landmarks and animals, or just have fun.

Then, see How Bing’s Image & Video Algorithm Works to learn more.

Google has more images available for viewing than Microsoft Bing. Make the most of it with the tips in A Guide to Google’s Advanced Image Search.

However, Microsoft Bing provides more detailed information about the image users are searching for.

google-pizza-6063236bdf99c.png

How Microsoft Bing & Google Handle Video Search

Microsoft Bing provides a much more visual video search results page, including a grid view of large thumbnails.

Google’s video results are more standard, featuring a vertical list of small thumbnails.

Microsoft Bing also provides a preview of certain videos and clicking on them does not take you away from Bing, which is cool. From my perspective, it also provides much more information in video results.

As you can see from the screenshot of a movie search below, they include ratings and reviews, as well as the cast and even where you can watch the movie, which is great.

bing avengers

I did not get this experience with Google video search.

This is one area where Microsoft Bing definitely outperforms Google.

google avengers

Map Listings on Both Search Engines Matter for Local SEO

Both engines have similar functionality for maps, including map listings and local listings in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

Make sure you claim all your listings in both Microsoft Bing and Google and optimize your profile with business information, photos, proper categories, and links.

Accurate name, address, and phone number (NAP) information are key.

See A Complete Guide to Google Maps Marketing.

Optimizing for Google Search vs. Microsoft Bing

Google is primarily concerned with E.A.T: Expertise, Authority, and Trust.

Google Searches are powered by machine-based algorithms that take into account users’ previous search history and location when generating results.

This means that if a particular user wants to find something specific on Google, it will be much easier than on Microsoft Bing because Google has a more complete picture of who that person is before they type anything in the browser.

Google has always been a link-orientated search engine in which the quality of links still matters instead of quantity. Links are not as important on Microsoft Bing.

In my opinion, Microsoft Bing has always been focused on on-page optimization. It puts more weight on content that is well optimized, or that includes important on-page elements like titles, descriptions, URLs, and content.

Unlike Google, Microsoft Bing states in its webmaster guidelines that it incorporates social signals into its algorithm. That means you should also focus on Twitter and Facebook – including building good quality content on your site and social platforms – if you want to rank highly in Microsoft Bing.

Content is extremely important for both search engines. Always focus on high-quality content that satisfies the user’s informational need. By creating useful and relevant content, users will naturally love it and link to it.

So, for example, if I am looking for cars, you should show me valuable content on the topic: how I can buy a car, cost, maintenance, what the shopping experience is like, etc.

Both speed, mobile-friendliness, and proper tech infrastructure matter for both engines. However, Microsoft Bing focuses more on anchor text usage. Bing has been known to reward sites with matching anchor text for a page title, which was devalued by Google many years ago.

Make sure you check out these resources for optimizing for various search engines:

  • Going Beyond Google: SEO on Other Search Engines
  • 7 Alternative Search Engines That Do Social Good
  • Embracing Bing Search & Giving It the Attention It Deserves
  • DuckDuckGo SEO: What You Should Know

Google Search vs. Microsoft Bing: The Verdict

Both Microsoft Bing and Google satisfy the informational needs of millions of people every day.

They both offer opportunities for your brand to reach new users and put you in front of millions of qualified customers who are looking for information, products, and services.

Optimizing for both search engines is similar. Microsoft Bing is more focused on on-page optimization and incorporates social signals, while Google is more focused on E.A.T. and links.

Microsoft Bing has definitely improved over the last year and is more competitive with Google, especially in its unique features.

That’s why I recommend optimizing for both, to reach the lion’s share of internet searches and maximize visibility.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Winston Burton - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]
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Categorized in Search Engine

Most web browsers access your geographic location via your IP address to serve local search results. Your browser may also have permission to use your device’s built-in camera and microphone. It’s certainly convenient, but it’s a huge security risk.

Here is a list of browser security settings you need to check now.

Browser cookies, extensions, and software bugs can slow your internet connection speeds to a crawl. Use these proven tricks to speed up Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge.

A browser is your gateway to the web and the cybercriminals looking to take advantage of you. If you’re ready to make a move to a more privacy-focused browser or see if yours makes my list, keep reading.

Best overall browser for privacy: Brave

If you’re fed up with trackers, ads, and data-hungry bits of code that follow you across the internet, Brave is the browser for you. Brave’s servers don’t see or store your browsing data, so it stays private until you delete it. That means your info is never packaged up and sold to advertisers.

The browser’s default settings block harmful junk like malware, phishing, and malicious advertising and plug-ins that could harm your computer.

Advertising and trackers are blocked by default. Because of all it stops, Brave says it is three times faster than Chrome overall and loads major sites up to six times faster than its competitors. 

Brave is free to use, but you can turn on Brave Rewards to give back to the sites you visit most.  Once enabled,  "privacy-respecting" ads will show to support the content you see. Your browsing history remains private.

What about user experience? It runs on the Chromium source code, which powers Google Chrome, so it will likely feel familiar.

Download Brave for free here. It’s also available as an app on Apple and Android devices.

Best browser for customizable privacy: Firefox

Mozilla’s Firefox bills itself as a fast browser that “doesn’t sell you out.” Detecting a theme here? Firefox collects very little data, and you don’t even need to give your email address to download it.

It also blocks trackers by default, so you don't have any settings to change.

The customization features make Firefox stand out. You can use global protection levels, such as "Strict" or "Standard" or go the custom route. You can choose precisely which trackers and scripts Firefox blocks to get the experience you want.

When it comes to privacy, it’s got many bells and whistles: a built-in password manager, breached website alerts, Private Browsing mode, and secure form autofill.

Firefox is compatible with Windows, Mac, and Linux, and smartphones to make it easy to sync across all your devices. Take Firefox for a test drive on your computer by clicking here. Or click to download it for Apple or Android.

Best browser for maximum security: Tor

If you’re super security-focused, you probably already use a virtual private network or VPN. Want even more anonymity? Turn to Tor. This name started as an acronym for "The Onion Router," and it's popular among computer-savvy circles.

Tor runs your connection through multiple servers across the globe before you reach your destination. Your data is encrypted between each “node,” adding layers of protection – hence the onion logo.

Tor has been used for illegal activity online, but the software itself is perfectly legal and shouldn’t pose any problems. It’s often the route into the Dark Web.

Tor runs on a modified version of the Firefox browser. You can download Tor here.

Best browser for privacy on Mac: Safari

Many people use the browser that came with their computer as a matter of convenience. If you've got a Mac, this is a good thing. Safari blocks cross-site tracking that lets you enjoy the sites you use most without worrying about being followed.

Safari uses Google as its default search browser, which blocks malicious websites and protects you from malware and phishing scams. It blocks pop-ups, too.

Safari’s built-in password manager (Keychain) lets you know if a site you saved was involved in a data breach and helps you change your password. Download Safari here, directly from Apple.

Alternative option: Microsoft Edge

Microsoft said so long to Internet Explorer, and the new Edge is a robust browser with lots of built-in privacy features. It, too, runs on Chromium and feels a lot like Google Chrome.

Edge offers protection from trackers and blocks ad providers from monitoring your activity and learning more about you.

Choose the level of restriction you prefer from three settings, and you can decide which sites to block or not on a case-by-case basis. Want to know what Edge is blocking for a particular site? Click the lock icon to the left of the URL, then click Trackers for a list.

Edge’s built-in Password Monitor will alert you if you visit a compromised website and prompt you to change your password to a stronger one. You can make your own or use a suggested password.

[Source: This article was published in usatoday.com By Kim Komando - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila] 
Categorized in Search Engine

Google Discover has a dedicated web stories carousel, but Search Advocate John Mueller says not all web stories get shown.

Google’s John Mueller advises site owners not to expect every web story they publish to get displayed in Discover.

Google Discover has its own web stories carousel, which was added last October, but only select content makes its way in.

The addition of a web story carousel leads some people to assume publishing one would automatically lead to visibility in Google Discover.

That’s at least true of a site owner who submitted a question answered by Mueller during the Google Search Central SEO hangout recorded on February 19.

The site owner asks: “How long does it usually take to show a web story in Discover after creating it?”

The short answer is – it depends.

For the full answer, see the section below.

Google’s John Mueller on Web Stories in Discover

When it comes to any piece of content, whether it’s a web story or any other type of web page, the speed at which it gets indexed can vary.

Content can sometimes get indexed quickly, and sometimes it can take a while.

On top of that, not everything in Google’s search index gets displayed in Discover.

Google Discover is a different thing from web search altogether.

Mueller refers to Discover as “another level” above web search where Google is more selective about what gets shown.

In his words, Google is “extra careful” about what gets shown in Discover because users are not looking for anything specific. The idea is to recommend the most appropriate content for each user based on what their interests are at that time.

It may take longer for some web stories to get recommended in Discover. But, unlike stories on other sites, there’s no shelf life for web stories. A web story will remain published for as long as a site owner chooses to keep it up.

However, it can also happen that a web story is never shown in Discover, Mueller says:

“The answer is: it depends. Unfortunately. It’s something where sometimes we can pick up content very quickly after it was created, and crawl it very quickly, and index it very quickly. Sometimes all of that takes a lot longer.

Discover in particular is yet another level on top of that, because for Discover we want to make sure we recommend something that is really appropriate for users. Because users are not searching for something specifically, so we have to be extra careful with regards to the content that we show in Discover.

So there in particular it could happen that it takes a little bit longer for it to start showing up in Discover. It can also happen that it’s never shown in Discover.”

Site owners cannot optimize a web story to get recommended in Discover any more than they can optimize a web page to do the same.

Impressions and traffic from Google Discover are known to be unpredictable. It’s great if you’re getting steady traffic from Discover, but it’s not something that should be depended on.

With that said, if your web stories are not being shown in Google Discover or Google Search, there may be a problem you need to fix.

Use Google’s AMP testing tool to check if your web story is valid. The tool will identify any issues preventing the content from being shown in Google’s web stories carousel.

Hear Mueller’s response in the video below:

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jay Harris]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google Search Console is changing how Core Web Vitals are measured and reported on, which is likely to be a positive thing for site owners.

Going forward, the metrics defining the boundaries for largest contentful paint (LCP), first input delay (FID), and cumulative layout shift (CLS) are now defined as = (less than or equal to).

Previously the boundaries for each of the Core Web Vitals were defined as (less than).

That meant the Google Search Console report would only show a “good” rating if measurements were under the ideal thresholds.

Site owners can now achieve a “good” rating if measurements meet the ideal thresholds.

For example, an ideal measurement for LCP was previously defined as less than 2.5 seconds. If LCP was recorded at exactly 2.5 seconds then the site owner would see a “needs improvement” rating in Search Console.

That is no longer the case. Now that same site will receive a “good” rating.

Google’s changelog notes site owners will likely see positive changes as a result of this update: “Therefore you might see a change in statuses (for the better) in this report.”

To refresh everyone’s understanding of what it takes to meet Google’s Core Web Vitals thresholds, refer to the updated verbiage below:

  • Largest Contentful Paint: The time it takes for a page’s main content to load. An ideal LCP measurement is less than or equal to 2.5 seconds.
  • First Input Delay: The time it takes for a page to become interactive. An ideal measurement is less than or equal to 100 ms.
  • Cumulative Layout Shift: The amount of unexpected layout shift of visual page content. An ideal measurement is less than or equal to 0.1.

Now would be a good time to review the Core Web Vitals report in Search Console to see where your site stands.

The rollout of Core Web Vitals as a ranking factor is still months away, but it’s never to early to start preparing.

Core Web Vitals will become ranking signals in May 2021. Google’s John Mueller has hinted at the fact that thresholds for all three Core Web Vitals may need to be met in order to benefit from the ranking boost. To optimize for all three rather than one or two.

Sites that meet the threshold for all three Core Web Vitals may also receive a special badge in Google search results, communicating to searchers that the site provides an optimal user experience.

Whether Google will go through with rolling out a badge in search results is undetermined at this point. But it’s 100% confirmed Core Web Vitals will be ranking factors.

Expect more information from Google as we get closer to May.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne] 

Categorized in Search Engine
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