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Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) wants to be a popular place to search for mentions of current news, in order, to get more public chatter, which normally is done on Twitter, says a report from TechCrunch. The social networking site though stumbled with its natural language Graph Search, refocused on keywords and is now seeing 2bn searches per day of its 2.5 trillion posts. In comparison, it was 1bn in September 2012 and 1.5bn searches per day in July 2015 – a 33% jump in just 9 months.

Facebook Inc. (NASDAQ:FB)

Facebook wants to rule chatting space

On the recent earning’s call, the Chief Executive – Mark Zuckerberg – said, “The growing way that people use search is to find what people are saying about a topic across more that 2.5 trillion posts. Now people are doing more than 2 billion searches a day between looking up people, businesses, and other things they care about.”

What the co-founder did not say, but certainly indicated was that the social network thinks the people should talk about things on its site because their words will find new audiences thanks to its massive user base and powerful search engine, the report says. This chatting space is actually ruled by Twitter, but since launching public post search last year, Facebook Inc(NASDAQ:FB) has been attempting to dominate the space.

Through paid search ads, the social media giant could open up new monetization opportunities if it can keep generating more search queries. However, the CEO cautioned that it was not going to happen overnight.

How it plans to do it?

Initially, Facebook’s search engine primarily focused in assisting the user find people they had met in real life and add them as friends. Then in 2013, the social network touted its semantic Graph Search engine as the third pillar of its service alongside the profile and feed. The users were, however, confused by the complex search queries required.

Eventually, the tech giant retreated the Graph Search, and released the true keyword search in late 2014 to allow users find posts by them or their friends. Later, the firm expanded that to include all 2 trillion posts on the social media.

For Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB), it was a huge turning point because it pitted its search engine finally against Twitter. The main aim of the social network is to underline why people should talk more on its network. For this, the social media giant built a special sports chatter feature called Stadium, and also focused on Facebook Live for citizen journalism.

Zuckerberg, on being asked about monetizing commercial searches, did hint of keeping the search business model for later. Even though this announcement was about search, its Twitter who should be concerned not Google.

On Wednesday, Facebook shares closed up 1.75% at $123.34. Year to date, the stock is up over 16% while in the last one-year, it is up over 27%.

http://learnbonds.com/130381/facebook-battles-twitter/

Categorized in Others

Big changes are coming to Facebook Live. The social network will let broadcasts run for up to four hours – or even continuously in some cases. Plus, you can now hide reactions and comments, view livestreams in full-screen, and restrict who sees your broadcast.

Here’s a quick roundup of all the changes coming to Facebook Live that marketers need to know.

1. 4 Hour Live Streams

Since Facebook Live launched, livestreams have been limited to 90 minutes. Now Facebook is more than doubling that.

Yes, broadcasters are now restricted to a mere four hours for users when broadcasting via the Facebook app or using the Live API.

2. Hide Reactions & Comments

Don’t want to see comments and reactions while you’re broadcasting or watching? Facebook will now let you hide both in a video-only mode.

All you have to do is swipe right to hide comments and reactions. Swipe left to bring them back.

In theory, this will help reduce distractions and help keep viewers focused on the broadcast.

3. Full-Screen Live

One significant change that is more geared toward viewers than broadcasters is that viewers can now watch broadcasts in full-screen mode, rather than as a square we’ve become used to over the past several months.

Although Android users will have to wait for full-screen mode until summer, iOS users can enjoy this new feature right away. Full-screen will work with both landscape and portrait viewing when fully rolled out.

4. Continuous Live

Want to go live indefinitely on Facebook? Now you can.

Continuous live video was actually added a couple months ago, but this one slipped under the radar of many marketers. “Some great use cases for continuous live include live feeds of aquariums, museums, and zoos,” according to Facebook.

The catch with continuous live? Your followers won’t receive a notification that you’re live. Also, once you end broadcasting, it’s gone forever. Your followers have to literally watch it when it’s live – there’s no rewinding or reliving it.

5. Geogating

Want only men to watch your livestream? Or people who are located in certain places?

New audience restrictions, what Facebook calls “geogating,” were added to the Live API at the same time as continuous streaming. Now you can target or exclude people by:

Location – country, state, city, or ZIP code.
Age – you can specify a minimum and maximum age.
Gender

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-live-update/169111/

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