Billions of searches are conducted each day on popular search engines and social networking websites by people all around the world. But what exactly do these people search for? A number of major search engines provide a way to glimpse into the web’s query stream to discover the most popular search trends, keywords, and topics.

google-trends-keywords

  • Google Trends: This allows you to tap into Google’s database of searches, to determine which keywords are most popular. View the volume of search queries over time (since 2004) worldwide or by regions and subregions, by languages, categories, and in Google properties such as news, image, or product search. Compare multiple terms, as well. Offers a list of what is trending now in Hot Searches.
  • Google Autocomplete: Google’s Autocomplete is a tool that can help round out your research by providing keywords as seen through the searcher's experience. When a searcher begins to type into the search box on Google.com, additional keywords are offered for searches that could be similar to what is typed. Google’s algorithm works to predict search queries in real-time based on indexed web pages, personalized search history, other users’ search activity, and Google+ (for person’s name). Since the results are personalized, you may wish for more control over the Autocomplete feature. This can be accomplished by logging out of Google, turning off customizations, deleting web history, and Google+ settings.
  • Yahoo Buzz Log: This Shows top overall keyword searches by Yahoo users with rank, buzz score, and how the search volume has moved in rank. There are additional options to narrow the buzz log by categories such as actors, movies, music, etc.
  • Bing Trends: More of a report, the Bing Community Search Blog breaks down billions of search queries from the previous year and offers insights by popular interests.
  • Bing Webmaster Keyword Research Beta: Find query volumes for phrases and keywords by country and language. This keyword research tool shows data show from organic searches on Bing. It also provides the number of impressions for a time period with Average Bid and Average CPC for ad placements on the top and sides of search results. A comprehensive description of this tool can be found in Bing Keyword Research Tool: Highlights & Limitations.
  • AOL Search Trends: Lists the top 50 search trends both hourly and daily on AOL. Data in AOL contains web and image searches (powered by Google), video (powered by Blinkx), News, Shopping, Maps, and Yellow Pages (powered by various providers).

twitter-search-image2

  • Twitter Search: This allows you to see what people are talking about on Twitter by keyword, hashtag, or username. Advanced search has many features, notable is the use of emoticons to find tweets with a specific attitude, for example, the sad emoticon represents a negative attitude.
  • YouTube Keyword Tool: Keyword suggestions for terms you enter with monthly search volume on YouTube. As one of the largest search engines, this keyword list will reveal valuable insights as to how people search when they are looking for video media specifically, rather than general search engine queries.
  • YouTube Trends: Provides insights into popular videos based on keywords and video views. Trending Topics are algorithmically generated topics from keywords in the title, tags, and description of the video within sets of videos that are currently rising in popularity. Trending videos are based on embedded video views and views on YouTube.
  • Google AdWords Keyword Tool: Enter a term or terms, to see search volume and keyword competition. Advanced options and filters allow you to refine by locations and languages and by desktop or mobile.

Top Searches, Questions, Topics, Memes & More

The major search engines and social networks also put out yearly recaps of the top trends of the year. Check out these past articles to get a glimpse of the top keywords, questions, topics, and trends people searched for each year:

2012

2011

2010

It's straightforward to comprehend why people use People Search Engines. They can be useful for obtaining micro facts about anyone, and these small bits of knowledge are important when looking into recruiting new staff or renting out our space so that we don't make mistakes with delicate tasks, such as working on one yourself!  One thing is universally accepted: there aren't any better social media than others if you want more detailed data gathered from their records (especially since they're called "People'' databases), but while the Association of Internet Research Specialist compiled this list of Specialized Search Engines - which includes alternative sources besides just the top 10 best people Search Engines - Please have a look.

Source: This article was published searchenginewatch.com By Lisa Raehsler

Published in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By SEMrush - Contributed by Member: Deborah Tannen

This is a sponsored post written by SEMrush. The opinions expressed in this article are the sponsor’s own.

According to recent SEMrush research, finding the balance between the creative element and search optimization is the most challenging task for copywriters. Some even believe there’s a clash between SEO and human-centered content creation.

It stands to reason that producing texts appealing both to people and search engines requires thorough research, and many writers see as a restriction on their creativity.

Is it still possible to marry SEO and content and make this alliance a happy one? We believe so.

Here are three points any writer should take into account in order to create catchy content that will also attract organic traffic:

  • Choosing a trending topic.
  • Increasing semantic relatedness.
  • Raising chances of getting into Google’s Featured Snippet.

1. Choosing a Trending Topic

Point: Picking the right topic is way more than just a free flight of imagination. You have to define what content your target audience prefers, what factors influence their choices, and what exact words can drive them to action.

Tip: Dive deep into local communities, learn the joys and sorrows of your “buyer persona.”

It may also be advantageous to take a closer look at those who are already successful in your niche. What lets them dominate the minds and the SERPs? What subtopics do your rivals cover, what headlines do they use, etc.?

SEMrush Solution:

Topic Research scrapes, organizes and sorts popular search queries and Google suggestions. It also provides examples of the headlines your SERP rivals used.

Meet four needs with one deed: gain insights into real needs of your audience, find original topic ideas, reveal common patterns in your rivals’ content strategies, and increase your chances of getting a featured snippet.

Topic Research

2. Increasing Semantic Relatedness

Point: As time passes, Google continues to evolve and get smarter about how it understands words and term relationships.

Tip: To keep pace with the search engines you need to enhance your keyword research and include more semantically connected words in your writing to rank higher.

SEMrush Solutions:

SEO Content Template comes in handy when you need to optimize the text on a single page without going into too much detail. Enter one or more target keywords, and the tool will analyze the first 10 pages from Google that rank for these keywords, and give you recommendations on which ones to use. The tool will also show you excerpts of your rivals’ texts with your target keywords highlighted.

SEO Content Template tool uses TF-IDF to provide you with the list of keywords with the highest potential. The list is automatically sorted by each word’s frequency.

SEO Writing Assistant is an extension for Google Docs that generates instant content optimization recommendations based on best-performing articles in Google’s Top 10. This gives content marketers an opportunity to check if their texts or the texts of external writers meet various requirements, such as general quality of the content, readability (appropriate reading-ease score, target and recommended keyword density.

SEO Writing Assistant

3. Raising Chances of Getting into Featured Snippet

PointGoogle’s featured snippet is something all content creators dream about because it guarantees maximum visibility for their texts and a serious increase in traffic inflow.

Tips: There are no surefire recipes to take you to so-called “position zero,” but some tactics are worth trying out.

  • Identify the pages of your website that already rank in the Top 10 and try to optimize them for popular queries.
  • Target question-based keywords and provide structured answers (paragraphs, lists, or tables may come in handy here).
  • Make sure you use header tags correctly.

Just find what can be improved on your page and keep working. When you are dealing with highly competitive keywords, it is worth the effort.

SEMrush Solution:

Position tracking is a versatile tool that will among other things let you find the keywords with the potential of taking you to the featured snippet. You’ll see your position in Google’s Top 100 and the SERP features available for each word on your target device and in your target location. You’ll also be able to compare your progress against your competitors.

screenshot-1 People Search - AOFIRS

As you get closer to your goal, you’ll able to monitor your target snippets (whether you or your rival is featured) and the new ones that appear for your target keywords.

Position Tracking

Finally

In the 21st century content just can’t do without SEO and vice versa. The amount of information offered to users is so great that even the best content is at risk of being lost if not carefully dealt with in accordance with basic SEO principles.

Will it harm creativity? With the right tools and a well-thought-out approach, you’ll be able to automate the most burdensome part of the routine and uncover more inspirational insights and opportunities to get as close to your audience as possible.

Published in Search Engine

Use Facebook Advanced Search to Find All Kinds of Things

A search for people who like cats on Facebook

Facebook advanced search is more a concept than a function. The world's largest social network had a standalone advanced search feature in the early days of its history but released a new service called Graph Search in early 2013 that essentially replaces the older advanced search features with a powerful new search engine.

To do an advanced search on Facebook, it's best to sign up for the graph search feature if you haven't already activated it and start learning how it works.

Our "Facebook Search Guide - Intro to Graph Search" provides an overview of how it works and the types of content you can look for and find with the so-called Graph Search. This article provides screenshots and explanations of more advanced query types and refinement options.

Reviewing the Basics

To start searching, remember you can just click on the Facebook logo with the help of a facebook advanced search or your name in the upper left corner and type any query. You can search for people, places, and things matching all kinds of different traits or criteria, including geography, dates, and clicks on the "like" button.

Two general filters you likely will use are "friends" and "like," since those refer to friend connections and the use of the "like" button throughout Facebook.

Also remember, it's smart to pay attention to the phrasing suggestions Facebook presents in a drop-down list whenever you start typing a query. OK, that's it for basics, ready to move on?

Query Phrasing Examples

Let's start with a general query not restricted to friends. You might type, "people who live in Chicago, Illinois and are single and like cats."

When I did this, the query turned up more than 1,000 people who matched the search, so Facebook presented two suggested phrasings that sought clarification on whether I meant "cats" as an animal or "cats" as a business. Those suggestions are shown in the image above.

When I specified the "animal" type of cats, Facebook presented a list of matching users, with a vertical stack of profile photos of people who live in Chicago and have clicked the like button on cat photos.

Facebook also asked if I wanted to see people who had liked "Cats & Dogs," the movie. And if I clicked the "see more" button, it offered "West Chicago" as a refinement option.

Click the "NEXT" button below to see the list of additional filters that facebook advanced search typically shows for people searches like this one.

Facebook people search filter

Advanced Search Filters for Chicago Cat Lovers

Running an advanced Facebook search like "people who live in Chicago, Illinois and are single and like cats" can produce so many results that you'll have to refine the query if you want to see any meaningful results.

The image above shows the typical people search filter box that is available on the results page for any query involving people. I've found that using this box is the best way to narrow a Facebook people search.

As you can see, the box allows you to refine Facebook advanced search results by gender, employer, hometown, employer, and so forth.

Each of those filters has additional sub-categories you can choose. For example, under "friends," you can select one of these:

  • My close friends
  • My friends
  • Friends of my friends
  • Not my friends
  • Friends of Joe SixPack (substitute any friend of yours for Joe)

Okay, let's look at a totally different example, this one involving Paula Deen and restaurants. It will allow us to explore the "places" bucket of content and the "like" button.

Click "NEXT" for a new example.

Facebook restaurant search

OK, let's try an advanced Facebook search involving restaurants. Say you're a Paula Deen fan and you start typing a query that says something general: "restaurants liked by people who like Paula Deen..."

Facebook may ask you to be more precise since there are so many restaurants liked by Paula Deen fans.

It may suggest you look at Savannah, Georgia restaurants, in Deen territory. It also will likely offer suggestions for types of restaurant queries that it can handle, as shown in the image above. It may rank them by popularity, such as Asian, American, Mexican, and so forth.

If you typed a more general phrase, leaving out a connector such as "by," and simply said "restaurants like friends Paula Deen," it would offer more precise versions of that query, such as restaurants...

  • liked by my friends who like Paula Deen (public figure)
  • liked by friends OF Paula Deen (person)
  • Cafes liked by my friends who like Paula Deen

You get the idea.

Next, let's explore more general searches based on geography, religion, and political views. Click "Next" below to see examples.

Facebook-Religious-Views-Search4-580713c83df78cbc28cac2e8 People Search - AOFIRS

Facebook Graph search makes it easy to do a search by city because one powerful search parameter for people on the social network involves geography.

You can find Facebook friends by city using either the city where they currently live or their hometown. Both are examples of structured data Facebook stores about users, making it easy to search.

You can also do a Facebook search by city for people you don't know, and based on the privacy settings of each individual, see a list of people living in particular cities who use Facebook that you are not friends with.

I started with a general search on "People who live in Los Angeles, California" and it helpfully told me: "Your results include people who've lived in Los Angeles, California at any time. you may want to limit your search to Current Los Angeles, California residents." As I phrased the question in different ways, it also asked if I wanted people who live IN L.A. or people who live NEAR L.A.

The "see more" button prompted me to check for "my friends" who live in L.A. I clicked that option, and it spits out a list of my 14 friends who happen to currently live in or near Los Angeles, along with a list below that of friends of friends who live there.

Advanced Facebook People Search Filters

The filter box for refining "people search results" even further is accessible through a small rectangular tab or label on the right, usually overlaid on the visual search results. What the label says varies with the type of search; in this case, it said "14 Friends" since that's how many matches I had. But it usually has three tiny stacked, horizontal bars. When you click on that little label, the filter box opens up with many more options for narrowing(or broadening) your search.

The people filter offers all kinds of basic and advanced refinements. They are classified under headings such as "Relationships & Family, Work and Education, Likes and Interest, Photos and Videos," and so forth.

Sort People by Political or Religious Views?

These filters are very granular, and some are potentially controversial. They allow you, for example, to sort people by their age range, religious views (Buddhist? Catholic? Christian? Hindu? Jewish? Muslim? Protestant), and political views (Conservative? Democrat? Green? Liberal? Libertarian? Republican?) You can even specify what languages they speak. Some filters get into highly personal areas and, therefore, have privacy implications that worry many people.

The image above, for example, shows the religious views options in the search filter box. It's similar to the political views box.

The political views filter, along with the ability to search on who "liked" Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, allowed me to easily sort my friends into those favoring the Democratic or Republican party, at least around the time of the 2012 election. That was a new thing for me--I'd never seen anything like that before--a bunch of profile pictures of my friends sorted by political views.

Extend Your Search in Other Ways

In my L.A. people search, the "extend this search" area at the bottom of the filter box suggested that I might want to expand my search to see "photos of these people," or "these people's friends," or "places where they've worked."

A remarkable variety of Facebook advanced search options, indeed. Click "Next" to see more search examples, this time involving apps and who uses them.

Finding Facebook Photos Lots of Friends Like or Commented On

Facebook photo search filters

One of my favorite facebook advanced searches is quite simple: "Photos I have liked."

Despite all the time I've spent on Facebook, I've actually clicked the "Like" button on just under 100 pictures. They obviously moved me, so it was fun going back and looking at them all again.

The "refine this search" button allowed me to also change my query easily to see all the photos that my friends have liked (provided their privacy settings allowed that.) That, of course, turned up the volume on the results, producing more than 1,000 photos.

Facebook's search results counter seems to stop at 1,000; when your results exceed that amount, it won't tell you how many more there are, just that there are more than 1,000. At least, that's what happened in all my trials.

You can do a lot of more specific photo searches similar to the example shown above, in which I searched for photos my friends took at zoos and aquariums. The background image shows photos that matched my query, and the filter box popped up on the right after I clicked the little horizontal bars previously mentioned.

I had fun playing around with this one using the filter box (shown on the right), especially using the "commented on" and "liked" filters to see which of my friends had commented and what they said.

(More examples of photo searches are available in our Introduction to Facebook Searching. Also, see our basic Facebook Photos Guide for general info on using pictures on the social network.)

Click "Next" below to see ways you can search for Facebook apps used by your friends.

Facebook Apps Your Friends Use

Facebook apps friends

Another interesting Facebook search you can run is "Apps my friends use."

Facebook's advanced search will spit out a list of apps with their icons in order of popularity with your friends, or which ones are most used by your pals.

Beneath the name of each app, it will list the names of a few friends who use it, along with the total number of your friends who use it.

Beneath the names of your pal, it will show a couple of other links allowing you to run additional, related searches. They are outlined in red in the image above.

Clicking "People" will produce a list of a bunch more people who use that app, not necessarily limited to your friends. This one is kind of creepy, but if you have not restricted the privacy settings for your use of this particular app, you could show up in the search results to anyone running a search like this.

Clicking "similar" is less creepy and more useful; it will show a list of other apps similar to that one.

Also fun is using Graph Search to find Facebook apps friends use. Facebook app search is a powerful capability of the new search engine. Here are a few specific queries Facebook may suggest relating to apps if you type apps and friends into the search bar, besides the most obvious one, "apps my friends use":

  • Apps my friends use that I use
  • Apps used by my friends who joined X (where X is a group you belong to)
  • Sports apps my friends use
  • Books apps my friends use
  • Apps my friends who live nearby use
  • Movies apps my friends use

As always, the suggested searches likely will vary based on your personal connections, likes, and interests on Facebook advanced search.

That's it for this tutorial. Now go explore the blue search bar. Have fun, and try not to get too creeped out.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Leslie Walker

Published in Search Engine

Searching for people online? Looking for an email address? Look closer to find friends old and new as well as business contacts with these email address directories and people search engines. Here are your best bets.

1-Pipl People Search - Free People Search Site

In real time, Pipl scours databases and directories such as ICQ, Amazon profiles, flickr, or SEC records to find information and people web search engines do not see. More »

2-Intelius People Search - People Search Site
Accessing various public records, Intelius provides comprehensive email address search for the U.S. and can reveal the person behind an email address, too. More »

3-LinkedIn People Search - Free People Search Site
LinkedIn worldwide network of professionals can be searched by name, industry, company, region and more. Of course, LinkedIn offers means to get in touch. More »

4-LexisNexis Public Records - People Search Service
For serious research: LexisNexis's public records and private database search covers hundreds of millions of people and businesses.

5-PeopleSmart - People Search Service
PeopleSmart finds people competently and relays messages to their email addresses so you can contact them. In addition, PeopleSmart can look up the person behind an email address in reverse email search. More »

6-Data.com Connect - Free People Search Site
Data.com Connect helps you find business contacts—across companies and countries, with many a criterion to narrow your search. More »

7-Facebook People Search
You can find everybody on Facebook (and just about everybody is on Facebook after all) by college, company, school, or name. More »

8-yasni - Free People Search Site
yasni scours social networks, the web, blogs, Amazon wishlists, and its own records for whomever you seek. If your search is fruitless, you can swiftly create a missing person ad. More »

9-FreshAddress.com - Free People Search Site
FreshAddress.com links old and new email addresses, but it's always up to date database can also be searched for other criteria. More »

10-EmailSherlock.com Email Search
EmailSherlock smartly searches directories and public records but also web services such as online calendars to return data and details about the person behind an email address. More »

11-Spokeo - Reverse Email Address Search Site
Spokeo's reverse email search shows you the name, photos, videos, social networking profiles, blogs, and non-email contact information behind an email address. More »

12-MyLife - Free People Search Site
Hand MyLife a name and approximate age, and it will often find the person you seek. After registering, you can see their details, too. More »

13-Myspace.com Discover People
The space to meet friends on the web was once heavily populated. You can still find ways to get in touch with artists, though, and possibly old friends on Myspace.com. More »

14-Plaxo Business Card Search
After becoming a Plaxo member yourself, you can search—and contact—others in their directory. More »

15-InfoTracer
InfoTracer aggregates publicly available information—from Social Security records to blogs and business ownerships—for search by name, location, and also email address. More »

16-Email Finder Reverse Email Lookup - People Search Site
Email Finder finds more than email addresses. It looks up the person behind an email address, in fact, with a detailed profile—for members only.

17-Reunion.com People Search - Free People Search Site
After registering yourself (which puts you in the directory), Reunion.com turns up comprehensive results that get you back in touch with people you knew. You can also search by school, for example, and find out who's looking for you. More »

18-XING - Free People Search Site
Popular in Europe, XING helps you find and connect to businesses and their people. More »

19-ICQ White Pages - Free People Search Site
Search the directory of ICQ users with numerous criteria to find old and new friends and their email addresses. More »

20-PeekYou People Search - Free People Search Site
You can search PeekYou's profiles for people (and a way to contact them) by name, company or school. More »

21-ThatsThem.com
You can search ThatsThem.com by name and address or, for reverse lookups, by email address with, in my experience, mixed results. More »

 

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Heinz Tschabitscher

Published in Search Engine

Facebook is the largest and most popular social networking site on the Web today. Millions of people check into Facebook daily, which makes it a fantastically powerful tool for finding people you might have lost contact with: friends, family, high school chums, military buddies, etc. In this article, we are going to look at a few ways you can use Facebook to reconnect. Note: as technology moves forward very quickly, keep in mind that some of the methods listed here might become outdated; however, at the time of this writing, all of these were tested and found to work correctly.

Facebook Friends Page

Go to the find your friends on Facebook page. You have a number of options here: find people you know by email, find people you know by the last name, find people on your IM (instant messenger) list, browse for people alphabetically (this is somewhat tedious) or browse Facebook pages by name.

Piggyback on Your Friends' Friends

Use your Facebook friends as a resource. Click on their Friends and scroll through their list of friends. This is a great way to find someone in common that you might have forgotten about.

Facebook Suggestions

Use the Facebook Suggestions link (found to the right of your news stream) as a jumping off point. You will not only see potential friends and fan pages here but if you scroll down a little, you will also see an opportunity to search within your groups: college, high school, workplace, camps, etc.

By default, when you search for a topic on Facebook, the results you see will be from your list of contacts; your "circle of friends", so to speak. If you would like to expand that circle to include results from anyone who has chosen to make their Facebook information publicly accessible, simply click on "Posts By Everyone." This gives you the option to view information from people who are not included in your contact list.

Search Facebook Profiles

Facebook has a page designated especially for the networks that people choose to belong to. On this search page, you can search by name, email, school name and graduation year, and company. More »

Filter Your Facebook Results

Once you start typing something into the Facebook search bar, a feature called Facebook Typeahead kicks in, which returns the most relevant results from your immediate contacts.By default, when you search for someone on Facebook, you will get all the result on one page: people, pages, groups, events, networks, etc. You can filter these easily by using the search filters on the left-hand side of the search results page. Once you click on one of those filters, your search results will rearrange themselves into only results that coincide with that particular subject, making it easier for you to track down who you are looking for.

[moduleplant id="558]

Search For Two Things at Once

Facebook (unfortunately) does not have much in the way of advanced search, but you can search for two things at once by using the pipe character (you can make this character by pressing shift backslash). For example, you could look for baseball and Billy Smith with this search: "baseball (pipe character) Billy Smith."

Find Classmates on Facebook

Search for former classmates on Facebook. You can either simply browse through a graduation year (this is a GREAT way to find people you have lost touch with), or you can type in a specific name to get more narrowed results.You'llo be given people from your alma mater if you include it in your own Facebook profile.

Find work colleagues on Facebook

If someone has ever been affiliated with a company (and has put this affiliation on their Facebook profile), you will be able to find it using the Facebook company search page.

Search for Facebook Networks

This Facebook search page is especially helpful. Use the drop down menu to search within your networks, or browse the left-hand side menu to filter your search results (recently updated, lists, possible connections, etc.).

Facebook's general search page searches ALL results; friends, groups, posts by friends, and Web results (powered by Bing). You are given the option to "like" pages and groups that you might be intereste

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Wendy Boswell

Published in Search Engine

Yet another online people search website has been targeted for allegedly breaking an Illinois privacy law, as a new class action alleges WhitePages.com also wrongly uses a web search advertising technique to use people’s names to market their search reports.

On Feb. 1, plaintiff Kevin Klingler, identified only as a resident of Illinois, filed suit in Cook County Circuit Court, alleging the behavior of Seattle-based Whitepages violates the Illinois Right of Publicity Law.

Klingler is being represented in the action by attorney Ryan Sullivan, of the firm of Kozonis & Associates, of Chicago.

The putative class action is the latest in a string of legal complaints launched in recent weeks in Cook County court against the online people search companies, which purport to help people locate and learn information about other particular people.

In January, attorneys with the law firm of Edelson P.C., in Chicago, filed class actions against the companies the operate the websites Spokeo, Instant Checkmate and PeopleLooker, alleging their use of the advertising technique, known as “Dynamic Keyword Insertion,” violates the rights of Illinois residents under the state law.

WhitePages is accused in Klingler’s complaint of also using the technique.

Under that practice, when a person inputs the name of a person – either their own, or that of another – into a search engine, like Google or Bing, online advertising purchased by Spokeo or similar sites seizes on that search to create a web ad specifically targeted at the person conducting the search. It does so by simply inserting the name of the person whose name had been plugged into the search engine, making the user believe WhitePages, Spokeo or similar sites can help the searcher find more information about someone.

In the case of WhitePages, Klingler contends, after he conducted a web search of his name, he was invited to purchase a membership allowing him to access information about himself.

“We Found Kevin Klingler,” the advertisement read, according to the lawsuit.

“WhitePages is exploiting an individual’s identity for commercial purposes,” Klingler’s lawsuit said. “WhitePages induces Internet users to click on the paid ad and purchase a monthly membership plan because it purports to have valuable information on the person they are searching for online.”

Klingler’s lawsuit contends WhitePages needed to obtain his “written consent” to use his name in such a way.

The lawsuit has asked the court to expand Klingler’s action to include a group of additional plaintiffs, which could “all Illinois residents whose names were displayed in one or more of WhitePages’ advertisements on Bing or similar search engines and who have never purchased any products or services from Whitepages.”

The lawsuit seeks damages of $1,000 per violation, as allowed under the Illinois law, plus punitive damages and attorney fees.

Author : Jonathan Bilyk

Source : http://cookcountyrecord.com/stories/511080122-whitepages-latest-people-search-site-hit-by-class-action-alleging-wrongly-uses-people-s-names-for-ads

Published in Search Engine

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World's leading professional association of Internet Research Specialists - We deliver Knowledge, Education, Training, and Certification in the field of Professional Online Research. The AOFIRS is considered a major contributor in improving Web Search Skills and recognizes Online Research work as a full-time occupation for those that use the Internet as their primary source of information.

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