fbpx

Need to find a job? These are the best job search engines on the web

If you're in the market for a new job, you'll want to check out this list of the best eight job search engines on the web. All of these job search tools offer unique features and can streamline your employment search efforts so your efforts are more productive. Each one is an incredibly useful tool that will help you localize your search, find interesting new positions that correlate to your experience and interests, and help you to find employment in a wide variety of genres. 

1- Monster.com

Monster Logo
Monster

Newly redesigned Monster.com is one of the oldest job search engines on the Web. While some of its usefulness has been diminished in recent years due to a lack of good filtering and too many posts by spammy recruiters, it's still an important site on which to conduct a job search. You can narrow your search by location, keywords, and employer; plus, Monster has plenty of job search extras: networking boards, job search alerts, and online resume posting.

Employers can also use Monster.com to find employees for a nominal fee, a useful tool for those looking to expand their hiring repertoire, find a new full-time or contract employee, or gather a pool of potential applicants for an upcoming position.  More »

Indeed logo
Indeed

Indeed.com is a very solid job search engine, with the ability to compile a resume and submit it onsite for employer searches of keywords, jobs, niches, and more. Indeed uncovers a wide variety of jobs and fields that you wouldn't normally find on most job search sites, and they do a good job of making their job search features as easy to use as possible. You can subscribe to job alerts via email; you can set these up for a certain keyword, geolocation, salary, and much more. 

In addition, Indeed makes it as simple as possible to keep track of jobs you've applied for; all you need to do is create a login (free) and every job you've applied for from within Indeed.com or that you've just expressed interest in will be saved to your profile. 

Daily and weekly alerts can be created with notifications going to your inbox; criteria include job title, location, salary requirements, and skill sets.  More »

USAJobs
USA Jobs

Think of USAjobs as your gateway into the huge world of US government jobs. Navigate to the USAjobs.gov home page, and you'll be able to narrow your search by keyword, job title, control number, agency skills, or location. One particularly interesting feature is the ability to search worldwide within any country that currently is advertising a vacancy. 

Just like many other job search engines on this list, you can create a user account (free) on USAjobs.gov, making the application process for government jobs extremely streamlined and easy.  More »

CareerBuilder Logo
Career Builder

CareerBuilder offers job searchers the ability to find a job, post a resume, create job alerts, get job advice and job resources, look up job fairs, and much more. This is a truly massive job search engine that offers a lot of good resources to the job searcher; I especially appreciate the list of job search communities. 

According to the CareerBuilder website, more than 24 million unique visitors a month visit CareerBuilder to find new jobs and obtain career advice, and offers job searches in over 60 different countries worldwide.  More »

5- Dice

DiceLogo
Dice

Dice.com is a job search engine dedicated to only finding technology jobs. It offers a targeted niche space for finding exactly the technology position you might be looking for.

One of the most appealing features that Dice offers is the ability to drill down to extremely specialized tech positions, giving job seekers the opportunity to find the niche tech jobs that are sometimes elusive on other job search engines.  More »

6- SimplyHired

SimplyHired Screenshot
Simply Hired

SimplyHired also offers a unique job search experience; the user trains the job search engine by rating jobs he or she is interested in. SimplyHired also gives you the ability to research salaries, add jobs to a job map, and view pretty detailed profiles of various companies.

If you're looking for a good job search engine that focuses on local job listings, SimplyHired can be a good choice. You can browse by town, by zip code, or by state to find the job that might be right for you.   More »

7- LinkedIn

linked in logo
LinkedIN

LinkedIn.com combines the best of two worlds: the ability to scour the Internet for jobs with its job search engine, and the opportunity to network with like-minded friends and individuals to deepen your job search.

LinkedIn's job postings are of the highest quality, and if you are connected to someone who already knows about that particular job, you've got a way in before you even hand in your resume.  More »

8- Craigslist

Craigslist logo
Craigslist

There are all sorts of interesting jobs on Craigslist. Just find your city, look under Jobs, then look under your job category. Non-profit, systems, government, writing, etc. jobs are all represented here.

You can also set up various RSS feeds that pertain to whatever job you might be looking for, in whatever location.

Caution: Craigslist this is a free marketplace and some of the jobs posted at on this site could be scams. Use caution and common sense when replying to job listings on Craigslist.  More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Categorized in Search Engine

If you need to do a little bit of sleuthing about someone, the Web can be a fantastic resource. Track down an address or a phone number, find a long-lost school friend, or simply verify information with this list of the best six people search engines on the Web. All of these search engines are hyper-focused on finding only people-related information.

These resources are free to use, at least for initial searches. Some sites will charge for detailed searches. Should you pay to find someone online? It really depends on the kind of information you're seeking.

1-Pipl

Pipl

Pipl is a people search engine that scours the Invisible Web for information; basically, what that means is that you're going to get more than just the usual search engine results for whatever name you might be searching for.

Pipl searches across social networking services, search engines, databases, etc. to find tidbits you might not usually find on a rudimentary search using a more generalized search engine.

One interesting thing sets Pipl apart: It offers special services for nonprofits at a steep discount in order to create more ways for these organizations to help their clients. 

2-Wink

Wink searches across what you would find using a regular search engine as well as across social communities, online profiles, etc. You can also use Wink to manage your online presence by creating a profile with it.

You can claim and add various places where you might be active online, and manage them all in one convenient place. If you're looking for small tidbits of information across many different sources, Wink is a good choice to continue to put the clues together about whatever you might be looking for. 

3-Facebook

Facebook

As one of the world's largest social networks with hundreds of millions of people accessing it daily, it makes sense to use Facebook as an incredibly useful tool to find people online. You can use the social media platform to search for people you went to high school and college with, as well as work colleagues, friends from elementary school, and non-profit organizations.

Facebook is also great for finding people in specific geographic locations living in your local area that you might not know about, as well as any kind of association, club, or group. 

While many people keep their Facebook profiles private and only give information to those visible in their immediate circles of friends and family, others do not. When a profile is public, it allows anyone who finds it immediate access to a person's posts, photos, check-in statuses and other personal details.

4-PeekYou

PeekYou adds an interesting twist to the world of free people search engines; it allows you to search for usernames across a variety of social networking communities.

For instance, if you want to learn more about the person who uses the handle "I-Love-Kittens"; PeekYou will show you anything else that username might be doing on the Web. There is an astonishing amount of information you can dig up on someone using only their username

5-LinkedIn

linkedin.jpg

Use LinkedIn to search for professional networks that other people are involved in. When you add your business profile to the network, you can pick up quite a few details about people. 

By signing up for your own profile, you can view other LinkedIn users' profiles. This lets you can see where someone works, who they work with, their former positions, current or former supervisors, any kind of recommendations they might have received, and much more.

Depending on privacy settings, you might not be able to see everything that someone on LinkedIn has provided in their profile. In addition, if you are a registered user on LinkedIn, the fact that you looked at someone's profile typically will be made known to them. 

6-Zabasearch

Zabasearch is a free people search engine that scours freely accessible public information and records. Everything found at Zabasearch is culled from public domain information, such as databases, court records, and phone directories. It's a smart place to start a search because of all the public information it retrieves and shows in one place.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Categorized in Search Engine

In my work as a writer and career coach, I spend a great deal of time on LinkedIn. I review hundreds of profiles a month, including those of new colleagues, potential clients, podcast guests, speaking agents, journalists, thought leaders and more. I also train my clients and course members how to communicate more powerfully, and build stronger LinkedIn content that elicits interest and follow up.

This work allows me a window into “seeing” people’s real personalities, challenges, and blocks through their writing. What I’ve learned is this: How you do LinkedIn is how you do your professional life.   And if you're not careful, your LinkedIn profile shares aspects of your professional life and how you view yourself that you won’t want others to know.

Here are five things your LinkedIn profile reveals that you’re probably not aware of (and will want to change).

#1: You’re hiding

If you don’t have a photo up on your profile, you’re hiding, plain and simple. LinkedIn is the world's largest professional network with more than 530 million users in over 200 countries and territories. With that volume of activity, many users undoubtedly would be interested in what you stand for and care about in your work. But without a photo on your profile, you’re saying “Don’t see me. Just pass me over. I’m not important or worthy enough for you to see my face.”

Tip: This week, take a photo (or have someone take it of you) – face front, smiling – and upload it. Make it professional (no bathing suits, etc.). This is a professional platform, not a dating app. Also, upload a great cover image (a photo for the banner at the top of your page) that represents something that will tell us more about you, what you care about, and why we should care. Always keep in mind who you want to engage with, and make sure your content will connect with people you'll be excited to talk to.

#2: You’re not passionate about your work

It’s clear how you feel about your work by the words you use to explain it. If you choose words that are drab, boring, passive, unclear –without any indication of what lights you up from the inside – then the message is that you don’t like your work. People who have deep passion for their field and endeavors communicate that with a vitality and energy that speaks volumes about how much they’re connected to what they’re doing.

Tip: Go through your profile, and replace every single word that is boring, repetitive, overused and uninspired. Find a way to talk about what you do so that people can say “Wow! She loves what she does and is good at it!” (If you can’t do that no matter how hard you try, it’s indicative that you’re in the wrong career, job or employer.)

#3: You don’t know your value or what you’re great at

I can’t tell you how many professionals miss the boat in terms of failing to share exciting, juicy facts of who they are, what they’ve done and the “needles” they moved in their roles. You need to communicate on LinkedIn exactly what you do that brings about important outcomes that help the company thrive or grow. And you need to communicate how you do what you do in ways that are different from how anyone else on the planet would do it.

Tip: Spend this weekend sitting quietly without distractions, and write down everything that’s made you who you are (your ancestry, cultural training, achievements, traumas, pivotal moments, relationships that flattened you and those that enlivened you, your passions and talents, and unique perspectives, etc.) Then connect the dots. Answer the question “How has every one of these influences shaped me in a way that makes me a powerful, valuable contributor to the work I do?”

Write down the "20 facts of you" – what you’ve accomplished, achieved and made possible, and the scope of those achievements (with metrics that illustrate the impact) and why these outcomes mattered to the organization. Sharing these facts is not bragging. It's helping people understand what you're capable of and how that's of use in the world.

#4: You’re seeking employment but don’t know how or where to look

When you write your headline with the words “Looking for opportunities” or “Seeking employment” you’re shooting yourself in the foot. You’re focused on what you’re lacking (a job) whereas your profile should be written to highlight what you have to offer. Write it with the express intent of engaging the reader. Your headline is the place for you to tell the world WHY they should hire you, HOW you’re unique and valuable, and WHAT is vitally important about your career trajectory and experience that others should take heed of because it will be useful for them. And make sure you are crystal clear about what you can do going forward, not just recite your past history.

 Tip: Never use your headline to talk about looking for opportunities. That’s a given. We’re all looking for opportunities there. Use that precious real estate to share what you do, who you do it for, and the outcomes you’re passionate about bringing forward.

#5: You’re not sure why your work matters

Finally, if you list only the tasks that you’ve performed and not the “what happened” after these tasks were accomplished, you’re leaving us guessing about why your work matters. Make it clear that the work you do has an impact, and can continue to make a difference in other situations, opportunities, and employers. You’re more than just your current job (please recognize that), but if you don’t share how you can apply your talents and abilities in ways that move organizations forward, the reader can’t envision exciting future possibilities for you.

Tip: Make sure that everything you write is not task-oriented, but benefit-focused. And share most about what you love doing, not the boring, mundane work you never want to do again. Every word you write has the power to attract you more of same. So if 80% of your work makes you feel dead inside, then emphasize the 20% that makes you feel alive, important and valuable in the world.

Source: This article was published forbes.com By Kathy Caprino

Categorized in Social

What are your most effective sources for finding talent? Do you leverage job postings? Ask for employee referrals?

These are both successful ways to fill a position. In fact, each one can play an integral role in your recruiting.

The only downside is that they’re reactive. You have to wait for the talent to come to you, in hopes that the right candidate is among them.

What you need is the ability to aggressively seek and go after ideal candidates. You need to build an active pipeline to fill today’s requisitions, make connections for hard-to-fill roles, and prepare for future needs.

You need to be proactive.

Luckily, there are several sourcing techniques you can start leveraging right now:

Boolean Sourcing for Google

Boolean sourcing allows recruiters to search for candidate information from all over the web.

You can find resumes and cover letters that are stored within personal websites, job boards and social platforms by using a unique set of search commands.

These commands tell search engines exactly what you’re looking for, and help drill down your search results to reveal the candidates who truly align with your requisition.

Getting started with boolean sourcing is as simple as learning some basic commands. The following operators work best when used within Google.

OR The command OR will return results containing at least one of your specified keywords or phrases. For example, entering programmer OR developer OR engineer would produce results containing any of these terms but not necessarily all of them.
"" Use quotations to return sites containing the exact phrase you’re searching for. For example, the senior manager would return pages containing either of these keywords, but "senior manager" would only return pages containing that exact phrase.
- Use the minus or dash command "-" before a keyword to return pages that exclude that word. For example, if you searched "marketing -manager" your results would exclude any pages that contain the word manager.
* Use the asterisk (*) within your query to identify a placeholder or wildcard terms. For example "Master's degree in *" would return pages containing the phrase "Master's degree in Marketing," "Master's degree in Computer Science, " etc.
() Brackets are for grouping Boolean phrases, and are generally used in more complex search strings. For example, if you searched for (Engineer or "Software Developer")(CISCO OR Microsoft OR HP), your results would show pages containing any of your job title keywords that also contain one of the company keywords. This is a great combination for finding talent who has worked for one of your target competitors.
site: Use the command site: to search pages within a specific website. For example, search for Facebook profiles by entering site:facebook.com. Searching for site:facebook.com "web designers" Phoenix would return Facebook profiles containing both keywords Web Designer and Phoenix.


Use these basic commands to create more elaborate search strings and effectively find candidates through Google. By adding more criteria to your search queries, you can produce more relevant results and ultimately find the best candidates who align with your job.

Job Board Sourcing

You can also leverage most online job boards to proactively source your candidates. Look for the option to search or source the job board's resume database by using common keywords your prospects would use.

Social Sourcing

Leverage the social platforms where your prospects already spend a lot of their time. Sites like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook offer unique tools to proactively find your next great hire.

In March 2013, Facebook released Graph Search. It’s a free tool that allows anyone to use specific queries to search for individuals. Find people who work for a specific industry, near a special location or for a particular company.

Here is an example of a common Facebook Graph query:
Facebook Graph

Twitter is also a great tool for sourcing candidates. Use its search engine to identify professionals by specific keywords, phrases, and locations. The best part is that Twitter is an open network, so you’re free to connect with anyone.

You can also find candidates on LinkedIn by using the Boolean logic you’ve already learned. After you replace the italicized words with your keywords, enter this powerful search string into Google to return precise LinkedIn profiles:
site:linkedin.com "web designer" "location * Greater Phoenix Area"

Go After Your Talent

Identifying qualified candidates is the most critical part of the recruiting process. It can also be the most difficult—especially if you're waiting around for the right job seekers to apply. Instead, set yourself up for success by proactively finding them yourself.

But before you get started with methods like Boolean, job board, and social sourcing, make sure you have a clear understanding of the job you’re recruiting for and the keywords your prospects may use during their job search.

Knowing how your candidates describe themselves and which terms resonate with them will give you a head start on your proactive search for talent.

Initiate Conversation

When you finally find the candidates you’re looking for, connect with them! Send them a message about your available position and ask if they would be interested in the opportunity. For more tips on reaching out to candidates, read Candidate Sourcing: Get More Replies to Your Contact Emails.

Categorized in Research Methods

Give me someone's name, and I'll find their personal email address. Sure, it may take some extensive digging and sleuthing, but I'll find you eventually. And I'm not paying to root you out or buying your private info from a lead gen company (though sometimes that would be easier). This is just good old fashioned, organic searching, scanning and scouring the Internet like a Web gumshoe. And not stopping until I ferret out that personal email.

How to find someone's email address [Summary]:

  1. Google Name + "Email"
  2. Google Name + Place of Work
  3. Search LinkedIn
  4. Search their company website
  5. Use Google's site search operator
  6. Use advanced Google search operators
  7. Try some "kitchen sink" queries
  8. Check social media profiles
  9. Check their personal blog
  10. Check Whois
  11. Check people search sites
  12. Message via Twitter or LinkedIn

We'll look at each of these methods in a little more detail, but first:

Why is it important to use someone's personal email address?

If you're sending out an important email that you really want to be taken seriously and improve your chances of getting an actual response, you need to go directly to the source. Sending an important, personal email to the info[at]companyX.com, or dumping it into a "Contact Us" form is a virtual black hole.

This is especially true if you're trying to get in touch with someone you don't know or you've never contacted before. Primary examples of this include:

  • Applying for a job
  • Any form of outreach, like a link request, interview request for your blog, if you're seeking media coverage for a story, etc.

What's more, by taking this extra step and getting directly to the source, you show real initiative and will distinguish yourself from the candidates applying for that same job or requesting that same link.

12 Tips and Tricks to Find Anyone's Email Address

Now, when I say "personal" email address, I'm not talking about a Gmail, Hotmail or AOL account exclusively. I'm also referring to their personal company email address, Web hosting domain email, blogger mail account, or any Web property email address I can find. Because of the depth and breadth and ubiquity of content sources on the Web, you can find contact information for pretty much anyone who has an email address, even if they don't actively promote it on their website. All you have to do is search and keep refining your searches until you strike pay dirt.

Let the Hunt Begin

1) Basic Name Queries by Googling Emails

You can start your sleuthing by running a generic search query for someone's name. But understand that this approach probably won't get you very far, unless the person you're seeking has a unique name, like say Jets WR Jerricho Cotchery. However, if that person's name is at all common, you'll need to add some distinguishing modifiers. Think of it as engaging in the long tail of name searching.

Some initial modifiers you should incorporate to narrow and refine your search are:

  • [name] + email (or) email address
  • [name] + contact (or) contact information (or) contact me

2) Name Queries with Personal Modifiers

Now, if that doesn't work, get even more granular and add any personal information you may have already or uncovered about this person in your initial search, such as:

  • [name] + "home town"
  • [name] + "company they work for"

You can even mix and match all the above modifiers. If you succeed here, terrific. Mission accomplished. But all too often, this is only the initial stage of your research, as this method yields results less than 10 % of the time. To really find who you're looking for, you'll need to go corporate.

Hunting for Company Email Addresses

3) Business Networking Search Queries

One of the best resources for finding direct contact information is through a company email network. Anyone working for an organization has an in-house email. Now, typically if you're searching for someone's direct email for a job interview, link outreach or media coverage, you likely know where they work or conduct business already. But if you're still in the dark, ZoomInfo and LinkedIn are pretty fertile grounds for harvesting personal information.

You can either search the websites internal engine or run queries in Google, like so:

  • [name] + LinkedIn
  • [name] + ZoomInfo

Notice the quick success I had with a probe of ZoomInfo.

4) Basic Company Name Queries

Now, once you get a place of business from their profile, you should visit the company website and start running queries, using the person's name in the hope that you'll find any indexed document with their email address. Most times, generic name searches yield citations (like so-and-so pitched a gem for the company softball team), not actual email addresses. So again, get more specific with modifiers.

  • [name] + email
  • [name] + contact

Adding these modifiers will really boost your chances of finding your target.

5) Basic Company Search Operators

However, if you're still coming up short, you'll need to roll up your sleeves. This is when I break out my super-sleuth hat and get creative with Google search operators. In the majority of cases, Google information retrieval yields more results than a company's internal search. If you're not familiar with search operators, read this.

So what you'll do now is search Google, using the Google Search Operator Query "site:companywebsite.com" as your root and sprinkle in modifiers, like so:

  • site:companywebsite.com + [name] + email
  • site:companywebsite.com + [name] + contact

6) Advanced Company Search Operators

Pretty much every organization has a unique, yet uniform company email addresses structure, which you can leverage in your search efforts, using advanced search operators. For example, at WordStream our email structure is “first initial + This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.." But since each company has their own format, you'll need to play around with a host of possible email address structures using the root search operator.

Note: Use the standard format here "@," I'm using [at] so as not to activate hyperlinks.

  • site:companywebsite.com + ken.lyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + kenlyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + klyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + ken [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + ken_lyons [at] companyname.com

It's important to mention here that the information you're seeking with these queries will be bolded in the meta tags text snippets, like so:

Find anyone's email site search operators

An example search engine results page (SERP) with results displayed
for site-search operation results 

I'd say this method yeilds results 80% of the time for me.

7) Random Kitchen Sink Queries

However, if you're still coming up short, you can drop the company search operator root and pound away with random combinations of the above suggestions. 99% of the time, this is very effective. For example, here's a random query I ran for a faculty member at Boston University (note: name is blurred for privacy):

Find anyone's email search by email domain

Notice my query: "BU [person's name] @bu.edu." It's kind of nonsensical, but nevertheless this query combination succeeded where the other techniques failed, yielding this person's email address. Point being, at this stage, I throw everything at the wall to see what sticks.

Even More Options to Find an Email Address

8) Social Networking Profile Queries

Another avenue you can explore for personal information are social media profiles. I've had the most success with social sites like Twitter. And chances are that employing the original basic queries that I mentioned above will display if this person has a Twitter profile.

  • [name] + Twitter

9) Personal Website or Blog Search Operators

Very often, my Web sleuthing reveals a personal website that I didn't know existed. Also, people include their personal websites or their blogs on their Twitter or LinkedIn profiles. This provides you a whole new channel to explore to find contact info for them. If you do find a personal site or blog, there's often have a contact page or even their email address listed right on the site somewhere. Even still, I prefer a direct line to that person. So if you've explored the site and come up short, navigate back out to Google and run some advanced search operators.

  • site:personalblog.com + [name] + email
  • site:personalblog.com + [name] + contact
  • site:personalblog.com + ken.lyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + kenlyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + klyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + ken [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + ken_lyons [at] personalblog.com

10) Whois Search

If you're still coming up empty after a deep dive of their personal website or blog, go to Network Solutions and run a Whois search for their domain registration data for an email address. 60% of the time, you'll find a personal email address here.

11) People Search Sites

Another resource for finding personal contact information are websites such as 123PeopleSearch, Intelius, and PeopleSmart. I've had great luck in the past using this type of free people search to locate the hard-to-find, and some sites allow you to search across multiple countries for personal contact info.

However, your mileage may vary from one search provider to another, and these days, it's getting harder and harder to find reliable, up-to-date information on these sites. As the Web has matured, many of these sites have either gone out of business or offer sub-par results. Sure, you might luck out, but be prepared for a mixed bag in terms of results.

It's always worth checking free people search sites as part of your research, but relying solely on sites like this is a mistake. 

12) If All Else Fails

Okay, if all else fails, you may have to resort to alternative, less "direct" methods like emailing your target through LinkedIn, or @-ting them on Twitter and asking them to follow you back so you can DM them and ask for contact information (if they're willing). For me, these are usually last-ditch efforts, which I've resorted to only a handful of times after if I've exhausted all of the other options I detailed in this post. But even though I prefer to send an email to someone's personal account, shooting them an unsolicited LinkedIn message to me is still far better than an info[at]companyX.com black hole.

Point being, 99% of the time if you're dogged, persistent, relentless and love the thrill of the chase like me, then ain't nothing gonna' stop you from finding the personal contact information you seek.

Happy email hunting!

Source: This article was published wordstream.com By Ken Lyons

Categorized in Research Methods

Searching for people online? Looking for an email address? Look closer to find friends old and new as well as business contacts with these email address directories and people search engines. Here are your best bets.

1-Pipl People Search - Free People Search Site

In real time, Pipl scours databases and directories such as ICQ, Amazon profiles, flickr, or SEC records to find information and people web search engines do not see. More »

2-Intelius People Search - People Search Site
Accessing various public records, Intelius provides comprehensive email address search for the U.S. and can reveal the person behind an email address, too. More »

3-LinkedIn People Search - Free People Search Site
LinkedIn worldwide network of professionals can be searched by name, industry, company, region and more. Of course, LinkedIn offers means to get in touch. More »

4-LexisNexis Public Records - People Search Service
For serious research: LexisNexis's public records and private database search covers hundreds of millions of people and businesses.

5-PeopleSmart - People Search Service
PeopleSmart finds people competently and relays messages to their email addresses so you can contact them. In addition, PeopleSmart can look up the person behind an email address in reverse email search. More »

6-Data.com Connect - Free People Search Site
Data.com Connect helps you find business contacts—across companies and countries, with many a criterion to narrow your search. More »

7-Facebook People Search
You can find everybody on Facebook (and just about everybody is on Facebook after all) by college, company, school, or name. More »

8-yasni - Free People Search Site
yasni scours social networks, the web, blogs, Amazon wishlists, and its own records for whomever you seek. If your search is fruitless, you can swiftly create a missing person ad. More »

9-FreshAddress.com - Free People Search Site
FreshAddress.com links old and new email addresses, but it's always up to date database can also be searched for other criteria. More »

10-EmailSherlock.com Email Search
EmailSherlock smartly searches directories and public records but also web services such as online calendars to return data and details about the person behind an email address. More »

11-Spokeo - Reverse Email Address Search Site
Spokeo's reverse email search shows you the name, photos, videos, social networking profiles, blogs, and non-email contact information behind an email address. More »

12-MyLife - Free People Search Site
Hand MyLife a name and approximate age, and it will often find the person you seek. After registering, you can see their details, too. More »

13-Myspace.com Discover People
The space to meet friends on the web was once heavily populated. You can still find ways to get in touch with artists, though, and possibly old friends on Myspace.com. More »

14-Plaxo Business Card Search
After becoming a Plaxo member yourself, you can search—and contact—others in their directory. More »

15-InfoTracer
InfoTracer aggregates publicly available information—from Social Security records to blogs and business ownerships—for search by name, location, and also email address. More »

16-Email Finder Reverse Email Lookup - People Search Site
Email Finder finds more than email addresses. It looks up the person behind an email address, in fact, with a detailed profile—for members only.

17-Reunion.com People Search - Free People Search Site
After registering yourself (which puts you in the directory), Reunion.com turns up comprehensive results that get you back in touch with people you knew. You can also search by school, for example, and find out who's looking for you. More »

18-XING - Free People Search Site
Popular in Europe, XING helps you find and connect to businesses and their people. More »

19-ICQ White Pages - Free People Search Site
Search the directory of ICQ users with numerous criteria to find old and new friends and their email addresses. More »

20-PeekYou People Search - Free People Search Site
You can search PeekYou's profiles for people (and a way to contact them) by name, company or school. More »

21-ThatsThem.com
You can search ThatsThem.com by name and address or, for reverse lookups, by email address with, in my experience, mixed results. More »

 

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Heinz Tschabitscher

Categorized in Search Engine

How do you generate leads for your business?

Do you buy them? Let them come to you?

Kidnap them? (Free tip: no!)

Or do you approach lead generation with a thoughtful and proven strategy?

If you have been struggling to generate leads for your business, don’t worry. I have been there. I know the struggle.

I know how hard it can be to build up a list of potential customers who actually want and need your product.

Which is why I am uniquely suited to help you overcome this problem.

While there are a ton of methods you can use to generate leads, one of my favorites is through LinkedIn.

Everyone and their cousin uses email, Facebook, and Google Adwords. But very few entrepreneurs have tapped into the limitless lead generating power that is LinkedIn.

In this article, I am going to show you a simple 5-step process for generating more leads than you can imagine.

Step 1: Optimize your profile

If you are using LinkedIn to connect with people that you do not know, your profile needs to be optimized.

Think about it.

If you have never met someone before and they try and connect with you through LinkedIn, what are you going to be looking for?

If you see an unprofessional selfie and a simple word or two describing what you do, they will be immediately turned off and unlikely to accept your invitation.

However, if they see a professional, high quality picture showcasing a handsome/beautiful businessperson and an intriguing biography, they are going to want to know more.

This means that optimizing your profile is pretty simple.

Completely fill out your profile.

Get a professional picture taken.

Then write an informative description/title, and you are off to the races.

Step 2: Create your own group

Creating your own LinkedIn group is a powerful way to generate new leads and build up your authority within your niche.

Luckily starting a LinkedIn group is easy to do. (Maintaining and growing your group however, is not)

Simply hover over the “interests” menu on LinkedIn, pick “groups”, select “my groups”, and then click “create”.

Follow the remaining steps you will see on screen and you are off to the races.

Once you have created your LinkedIn group, you will want to start adding content, even before you start adding new members.

A great way to do this is to use Buzzsumo to find trending content within your niche and then rewrite that content offering even more value to your audience.

Once this is accomplished, it is time to start targeting leads.

Step 3: Create your “potential customers” list

Now that you have your group started and you have some content rolling in, it’s time to start bringing in the leads.

Your goal should be to create a list of 500-1,000 potential leads.

I know this seems like a lot.

But it really isn’t, especially with LinkedIn’s built-in search function.

If you think about it, LinkedIn has over 400 million users.

This means that you could easily generate tens of thousands of potential leads if you had the time to reach out to them.

Use the filters on LinkedIn’s built-in search to find the best potential leads for your business.

You want to focus on people within your industry who are roughly at the same level as you. (CEOs if you are a CEO, managers if you are manager)

Once you have accomplished this and built up a large enough list of potential leads, it’s time to get the gloves on and start connecting.

Step 4: Start connecting with members on your list

This step is by far the most time consuming aspect of the entire process.

Your list of thousands of potential leads will not be built in a single afternoon.

Make sure that your profile is optimized for the industry that you are reaching out to.

Once you have done this, you need to start reaching out to each member by sending out messages requesting to connect.

Don’t overdo it. Just send a simple message and you will be fine.

Step 5: Engage with your members and then close

The final step in this process is to start engaging with your audience and then close the sale.

You want to make sure that you pace this step.

Spend a couple of months building up rapport with the members of your group.

Become known as an industry leader and influencer by regularly blogging and publishing relevant content.

Offer massive value to every member. Connect anytime that they reach out to you. Try and genuinely solve their problems.

Then, after you have laid the groundwork, host a webinar and invite your entire group.

If you have been able to successfully engage with your audience, you will have a high turnout rate and will be able to easily convert a large portion of your group with little effort.

Once this is done, keep the group going, start another one, and do it all over again.

Conclusion

Generating sales through LinkedIn is a time consuming process. It can take months before you will see results.

But because of the rapport that you can build and the advanced targeting options within LinkedIn, it is well worth it.

By using the above strategy, you will be able to generate more conversions than you can imagine.

If you can execute these steps properly, this is possible the most effective strategy in online marketing for generating leads.

So stop reading this article, and go start your group -- now!

Drop me a line in a couple of months when you are converting leads in numbers you had never thought possible.

Source: This article was published forbes.com By Neil Patel

Categorized in How to

LinkedIn's Advanced Search holds the keys to the kingdom when it comes to finding your ideal clients and customers on the platform. Here's how it works.

What if you take the power of Google Search with the real-time communication abilities of Facebook and make it work specifically for professionals?

That's exactly what it's like to leverage LinkedIn's extraordinary internal search engine, which indexes data points on its 500 million users.


Far too few of the platform's users understand the hidden treasure of LinkedIn's Advanced Search features, which allow you to instantly create a targeted list of your ideal B2B prospects with a few clicks.

I'm going to explore a few of them with the rest of this post.

3 Steps to Finding Sales Leads on LinkedIn

If you follow the simple steps I've outlined below, you'll walk away with a fast, easy, and efficient way to generate more sales leads than you know what to do with on the world's largest platform for professionals.

As someone who has spent the past five years showing others how to generate new business with LinkedIn, I still meet people each day who had no idea what's possible on the platform.


If you're in that camp, prepare to have your eyes opened -- wide!

Step 1 -- Do an Advanced Search on LinkedIn

Start by typing in the job title of your ideal prospect. It might be "business coach" or "chiropractor" ... even if your ideal prospect could be anyone, begin by niching down to a target audience where you've had experience or success.

On LinkedIn, the #1 rule of sales and marketing is this -- the riches are in the niches!

Once you've chosen a job title and gotten your initial search results, choose "People," and use the filters on the right side of the page to narrow this list even further.

TIP: If you filter this list down to 2nd-level connections, you can send that group of potential customers invitations to connect.

LinkedIn Advance Search

Step 2 -- Create Customized Connections

Here's where you get strategic. Based on your search filters, you can drill down to where someone lives, went to school, their industry, and so on. You take that information and personalize your invitations and messages accordingly.

For example, say you search for "marketing directors" and filter by 2nd-level connections located in Chicago. Here's a script you could use to connect with those marketing directors:

Hey [insert name] -- I see you live in the Windy City! It's my favorite town; I actually lived there for 10 years. I'm a copywriter here in the Twin Cities now and I am just looking to connect with marketers like yourself here on LinkedIn!

You think the Cubbies have a team this year -- or are you a Sox fan like my husband?

Cheers!

The trick is to not only personalize, but to also find a way to ask about where they live, or about the weather in their city as part of your invite. This begins an easy dialog that has nothing to do with work, breaking the ice and getting the relationship off on the right foot.

Step 3 -- Reach Out and Scale Up

Use these scripts as a quick and easy way to personalize a batch of invites based off your search filters, with a quick copy and paste.

(Note: You can also use third-party automation tools like LinMailPro to save yourself an immense amount of time!)

To send a personalized note with each connection request, you have to click "Add a Note." You can do this one at a time for each person on your list, and within a few minutes you can send out 5-10 personalized invites to people based on those search filters.

Always, always, always do one-on-one personalized marketing when you're connecting with new leads.


I can't say this enough: Personalization is key to success for lead generation on LinkedIn!

The Keys to the Kingdom

LinkedIn's internal search engine is immensely powerful, and yet many members still don't realize it or don't use it this way. As a result, you can get ahead of your competition and add a huge funnel of prospects.

What's more, with LinkedIn's new messaging features, you can instantly launch into a real-time chat with your new connections as good as any face-to-face coffee meet-up!

These conversations on LinkedIn can give you the opportunity to -- at the right time -- ask to share a relevant blog post you've done, or some other way to bring value to the relationship as you build toward a transaction.

If you're not using LinkedIn's Advanced Search like this already, take the steps I've outlined above and get going!

Source: This article was published inc.com By John Nemo

Categorized in Social

CREDIT: Getty Images

This will help you decide whether to keep or delete them.

Answer honestly: Do you know every single one of your LinkedIn contacts?

Let me guess: The answer is no.

Maybe you ended up in this situation because it was a strategic move, you wanted to be more closely connected to recruiters or people at your dream company. Or maybe you think the whole point is to build out your network with new people. Maybe someone had a ton of mutual contacts, wrote you a personalized note, or just had a really cool job title.

The list goes on, but the point is: You're probably connected to quite a few strangers on LinkedIn. And more often than not, you probably wonder:

Does it make more sense to stay connected or delete them?

While I can't tell you to keep them all, or delete them all, I can show you a few pros and cons to your decision.

Pro: It's Pretty Simple to Remove Someone

The steps laid out on LinkedIn Help are pretty straightforward, so you can make the change without a ton of effort:

  • Go to the other person's profile page.
  • Click the "..." to the right of their photo.
  • Select "Remove connection."
  • See "Remove Connection" now read as "No Longer Connected."

Con: You Can't Undo It

Before you go on a deleting spree, keep in mind that while removing someone only takes a few clicks, there's no "undo" button. In order to be connected again, you'll have to send a new request.

So, this is a good time to distinguish between strangers (that person on the other side of the country, in a different industry, who's never commented on a single status update) and someone you've never met, but who's in your industry, comments on your posts, and is connected to your colleagues.

Also, keep in mind that you can message connections for free, but you can't send InMail to strangers unless you pay for a Premium account.

Pro: They Won't Be Notified

LinkedIn's not going to send the other person a message that they've been deleted, so it's possible they won't realize it. Again, this is especially true if you really don't interact at all (i.e., you don't share groups, and they've never sent you one of those pre-written birthday notes).

Con: They Might Eventually Notice Changes

At the same time, LinkedIn will remove all connectivity between your profiles, so any endorsements you've given each other will be deleted. (Recommendations you've given each other will be deleted too, but that shouldn't be relevant.)

Plus, if they go to view your profile, you'll no longer show up as a first-degree connection, and what they see may vary if your public profile is different.

Pro: You Can Streamline Your Feed

You've seen the "LinkedIn is not Facebook" memes and probably have some contacts (even ones you know!) who share things that you could do without. If there are strangers who are just cluttering your feed, then yes, deleting them means you won't see anything they post anymore.

Con: That's Not Always a Good Thing

At the same time, having different voices on your feed means you'll see other viewpoints and articles you might not have seen otherwise. So, if you don't know someone, but they're always sharing interesting content, you may want to think twice before deleting them. (Note to self: High-quality shares can encourage people to keep you on their list!)

Truth talk: You don't want a useless network full of strangers. And so, if there's someone you can't imagine yourself messaging, or, if you'd deny their request if they sent it today, then it's OK to hit "Remove connection."

That said, if there's a chance you'll ever want to reach out to them--or could bump into them--it's probably better to stay connected. If your goal is just to spend your time on LinkedIn more effectively and only see posts from people you know, consider using the "unfollow" button, instead. (It's a drop-down option on the upper-right section of statuses).

This'll hide the selected person's posts, so you'll only see updates the people you want to stay in touch with.

This post originally appeared on the The Muse.

Categorized in Social

Snapchat Stories kicked off a new trend for listing friends that have viewed your updates / Getty

LinkedIn is probably the most generous social network of them all for online lurkers

Lots of us would love to know which of our friends and connections are secretly looking at our social media updates without engaging with them but, more often than not, networks deliberately make this information either difficult or impossible to access.

Users can openly express interest with likes, comments and retweets, but we’ll always be curious about the unknown. 

Fortunately, there are a number of straightforward ways to dig up telltale “stalking” signs across the biggest social networks, with some providing a little more insight than others.

 

Facebook

The sheer number of dodgy-looking ‘Who Viewed My Profile?’ type apps that are available to download show just how desperate a lot of Facebook users are to identify potential secret admirers. 

While the site doesn’t allow you to find out who’s visited your profile, it keeps track of the friends who’ve checked out your ephemeral Facebook Stories updates, gathering their names in a list that only you can see.

Assuming that your privacy settings allow people to follow you, you can find a complete list of the people who don't want to be your friend but do want to know what you get up to by clicking the Friends tab on your profile and selecting Followers. 

Somewhat unnervingly, Facebook also allows users to create secret lists of friends. As of yet there’s no way to find out if you’re on somebody’s list, but if you are, its creator will get a notification each time you post something.  

Twitter

As a social network built more heavily around news and opinions rather than personal pictures and activities, Twitter-stalking doesn’t appear to be quite as much of a thing.   

There’s still a way to find out more information about who’s viewing your updates, but it’s not particularly precise. 

The microblogging site’s Analytics Dashboard offers up a number of useful insights, including tweet impressions, link clicks, detail expands and the gender, location, age and interests of the people interacting with your posts, but you’re ultimately unlikely to identify a stalker this way.   

Instagram

As is the case with Facebook, it’s Instagram’s Stories feature that gives the game away. It works in a similar manner, to Facebook Stories listing the names of the people who’ve viewed your 24-hour posts.

However, making your account public allows people who don’t follow you to watch your Instagram Stories posts too. Only in their case, you’ll know that they went out of their way to see what you've been getting up to. Just like your friends, their names will be included in a list that only you can see. 

Making your account private will cut off Stories access for non-followers, and you can also hide your Story from people who actually do follow you.

Snapchat

As most people are aware, both Facebook Stories and Instagram Stories are ripped from Snapchat, which has something of a reputation for being one of the raciest social networks.

Snapchat Stories kicked off the trend for displaying all of the friends that have viewed your pictures and videos, but it goes a step further by also notifying you when any of them screenshot your updates. 

LinkedIn

At the opposite end of the spectrum is LinkedIn, but the professional network is arguably the most generous of the bunch for online stalkers. ‘Who’s Viewed Your Profile’ is a core feature, with the site notifying you whenever a fellow user visits your page, and vice versa.

However, you can't view the names of members who've chosen to visit your profile in private mode, even if you’ve paid for a Premium account.

You can try to turn the tables on your stalkers – without coughing up for advanced features – by selecting Anonymous LinkedIn Member under Profile Viewing Options in the privacy menu, though this also hides the identity of every single person who visits your profile.

Source : This article was published independent.co.uk By AATIF SULLEYMAN

Categorized in Social
Page 2 of 4

AOFIRS

World's leading professional association of Internet Research Specialists - We deliver Knowledge, Education, Training, and Certification in the field of Professional Online Research. The AOFIRS is considered a major contributor in improving Web Search Skills and recognizes Online Research work as a full-time occupation for those that use the Internet as their primary source of information.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.