LinkedIn Events and LinkedIn Live are coming together to create a new virtual event solution.

LinkedIn Pages are being updated with the ability to create virtual events, in response to the rapid shift from in-person to online conferences.

Virtual events are made possible by combining two existing features: LinkedIn Events and LinkedIn Live.

The two features can now work together, allowing marketers to stream live video content directly to LinkedIn Events attendees.linkedin.png

We’re in the midst of a social media live video boom right now, and LinkedIn is included in that.

According to LinkedIn’s data, live video is driving significantly more engagement than other types of videos.

Live video on LinkedIn is seeing 23X more comments per post and 6X more reactions per post than native video.

It’s the most effective solution for generating real-time engagement between a LinkedIn page and its followers.

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Why Host a Virtual Event on LinkedIn?

In an announcement, LinkedIn emphasizes the following benefits of hosting a virtual event on its platform:

  • A safe and trusted environment: Using LinkedIn Live, you can choose to live stream to your Page followers or Event attendees, so you can meet audiences where they are.
  • Attract the right professional audiences: Make your event open to Page followers only and send direct invitations to your first-degree profile connections.
  • Additional buzz and engagement: Build buzz for your event or live broadcast by posting an update to your Page or Event feed.
  • Greater longevity: Live broadcasts will be saved in the page’s Video tab for later viewing.

While on the topic of benefits, it’s also worth mentioning that virtual events are free and easy to set up.

How to Host a Virtual Event on LinkedIn

In order to create virtual events, your Page will first have to apply for access to LinkedIn Live and get approved.

To get approved for LinkedIn Live your page must have at least 1,000 followers.

LinkedIn also notes it only approves pages that actively engage with their communities by responding to comments and creating back-and-forth dialogue.

For those approved for LinkedIn Live, the process of creating a virtual event is as follows:

  • Create a LinkedIn Event
  • During the creation process indicate that it is “online-only.”
  • On the day of the event, open your third party broadcast tool and select the event as the stream destination, rather than your organization’s Page.

Currently, third-party broadcast tools that integrate LinkedIn Live and LinkedIn Events include Streamyard, Restream, Wirecast and Socialive. Wowza is coming soon.

As soon as the stream starts all event attendees will be notified.

Deciding on the Right Time to Go Live

Not sure when to go live?

Here’s a pro tip!

You can figure out the optimal time to go live by reviewing the “Followers” tab under Analytics.

Using the data in this tab you can see where most of your audience is located.

Then, go live at a time that allows the largest segment of your audience to join (e.g. during the word day or right after).

This new functionality is available now as part of a regular quarterly update to LinkedIn pages.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez] 

Published in Social

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]

LinkedIn is rolling out new tools to help pages drive leads and measure the results.

The company says its listening to feedback from page admins and introducing custom call-to-action (CTA) buttons.

“As a Page Admin, we’ve heard that you want the ability to customize the way you engage with your Page followers and visitors. Beyond the primary “Follow” button, we’ve now added the ability to select a custom CTA button for your Page.”

Custom CTA buttons can be set up to drive leads in five different ways. Options include:

  • Contact us
  • Learn more
  • Register
  • Sign up
  • Visit website

In order to measure results from the CTA buttons, page admins will have access to new analytics dashboards.

Admins can find the click-through analytics for their custom CTA buttons either in the page admin home dashboard or at the top of the visitor analytics tab.

Other new features

In addition to CTA buttons and new analytics, LinkedIn is bringing two more features to pages.

Communities hashtags

You can now associate your page with relevant hashtags using the communities feature in the admin center. This will give you the ability to engage directly with LinkedIn members through the hashtag content feed.

Mobile admin editing

Admins can now update key page details and edit already published posts their your mobile device.

Communities hashtags and custom CTA buttons are available on desktop only.

Published in Social

 [Source: This article was published in cnbc.com By Karen Gilchrist - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]

What are the most useful skills to have in today’s shifting work environment?

It’s a question that’s on the minds of employers and employees alike, but LinkedIn claims to have the answer.

In a new “Future of Skills” report, the professional networking site has drawn on data from a regional subset of its more than 600 million members to identify what it sees as the “rising skills” of the workforce.

Focusing specifically on the Asia Pacific region, the report highlights 10 skills that have experienced “exponential growth” over the past 5 years. That refers to both a surge in listings of those skills on members’ profiles and also an increase in demand from employers.

Typically, demand for those “rising skills” was three times higher than for other areas of expertise in the past 12 months, LinkedIn said. That’s a figure the company expects will rise further over the coming years, it added.

“These skills may be nascent now but will potentially see wide-scale adoption in the future,” the report noted.

Indeed, 42 percent of the core skills required for common occupations are expected to change by 2020, according to 2018 research from the World Economic Forum cited by the report.

Here are LinkedIn’s 10 rising skills in Asia Pacific and the jobs to which they are best applied:

Artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is an area of computer science that uses machines to perform human-like tasks. As companies become more dependent on data, AI is playing an increasing role in their decision-making processes. Airbnb, for example, now uses visual recognition and machine learning to understand what photos are most attractive to potential guests.

Occupational applications:

  • Business analyst
  • Data scientist
  • Software engineer

Blockchain

Blockchain refers to a decentralized public ledger which stores a growing list of records, known as blocks. Blockchain has risen to prominence over recent years as the underlying technology behind cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, but it’s applications are wide-reaching. Today, the technology is used in sectors such as the law, security and even education.

Occupational applications:

  • Blockchain developer
  • Chief technology officer
  • Consultant

Compliance

In an increasingly globalized world, businesses need to make sure they comply with the various regulatory and legal frameworks of each of the countries in which they operate. That has spawned a growing demand for compliance experts.

Occupational applications:

  • Chief data officer
  • Compliance officer
  • Risk management officer

Continuous integration

In software engineering, continuous integration refers to the regular merging of all developers’ work onto one shared platform. The aim of the role is to help detect problems early on in the development process.

Occupational applications:

  • DevOps engineer
  • Full-stack engineer
  • Software engineer
Continuous integration
A young female Asian employee writes notes on a glass window in the meeting room.
Kelvin Murray | Taxi | Getty Images

Frontend web development

Frontend web development is the process of converting data into the graphical interface, or web pages, seen by internet users. In today’s increasingly digital world, that process is required by businesses across most industries. However, LinkedIn highlighted opportunities in Asia Pacific’s retail sector, where e-commerce sales are expected to reach $3.5 trillion by 2021.

Occupational applications:

  • Frontend developer
  • Full-stack engineer
  • Web developer

Gesture recognition technology

Gesture recognition technology aims to close the gap between humans and devices by teaching computers to read human movements. The global gesture recognition market is expected to be worth $30.6 billion by 2025, and the banking, higher education and advertising sectors are jumping aboard.

Occupational applications:

  • Mobile engineer
  • Researcher
  • Software engineer

Human-centered design

The human-centered design aims to put user experience at the forefront of all design decisions. It is an approach for which Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was famed, and one that will be increasingly in demand in the Asia Pacific as product development ramps up, according to LinkedIn.

Occupational applications:

  • Graphics designer
  • Product designer
  • User experience designer
Human centered design
skynesher | E+ | Getty Images

Robotic process automation (RPA)

Robotic process automation is an emerging form of business process automation. Using robotics or artificial intelligence, the process aims to automate high volume, repetitive tasks. Examples of its use are in banking and telecoms, where transactions and customer complaint procedures can be automated.

Occupational applications:

  • Business analyst
  • Consultant
  • Robotics engineer

Social media marketing

Social media marketing is the use of social media to promote product and services. With social media adoption continuing to grow rapidly in Asia Pacific, businesses are increasingly using it to reach new and existing customers. Indeed, 74 percent say they believe social media marketing contributes to their bottom lines.

Occupational applications:

  • Digital marketing specialist
  • Marketing manager
  • Social media marketing manager

Workflow automation

Workflow automation is the process of automating manual processes based on pre-defined business rules. By automating repetitive, low skilled processes, businesses say they can free up employees’ time for more creative and higher skilled tasks.

Occupational applications:

  • Consultant
  • Project manager
  • Software engineer
Published in Online Research

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Bridget Miller]

LinkedIn has released a list of professional skills that companies need most in 2019.

There are 50,000 professional skills in the world, according to LinkedIn data.

The company has combed through its data to determine the hard skills and soft skills that are most valuable this year.

“These are the skills your boss and your boss’s boss find most valuable, but have a hard time finding – and the skills that’ll most help you better serve your clients and customers.”

Those who are looking to improve their skill set this year could consider this data a starting point.

Most In-Demand Soft Skills

According to LinkedIn data, 57% of senior leaders today say soft skills are more important than hard skills.

Here’s what they need most and why:

  1. Creativity: Organizations most need creative employees who can conceive the solutions of tomorrow.
  2. Persuasion: The key to having a great product is persuading people to buy into it.
  3. Collaboration: As projects grow increasingly more complex, effective collaboration is becoming more important.
  4. Adaptability: An adaptable mind is an essential tool for navigating today’s ever-changing world.
  5. Time Management: Mastering time management today will serve you the rest of your career.

Most In-Demand Hard Skills

To no surprise, many of the most valuable hard skills are those that can be utilized in today’s increasingly digital world.

Here’s are the top 5 skills companies need most and why:

  1. Cloud Computing: Companies are desperately searching for engineers who have the skills to accommodate a shift toward the cloud.
  2. Artificial Intelligence: Data suggests that the age of AI has arrived.
  3. Analytical Reasoning: Companies are hungry for professionals who can make smart decisions based on vast arrays of data.
  4. People Management: Companies are shifting toward having leaders who can coach and empower others.
  5. UX Design: This is is the key to making a digital world work for humans.

Here are the rest of the most in-demand hard skills in order:

  • Mobile Application Development
  • Video Production
  • Sales Leadership
  • Translation
  • Audio Production
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Scientific Computing
  • Game Development
  • Social Media Marketing
  • Animation
  • Business Analysis
  • Journalism
  • Digital Marketing
  • Industrial Design
  • Competitive Strategies
  • Customer Service Systems
  • Software Testing
  • Data Science
  • Computer Graphics
  • Corporate Communications

LinkedIn measured demand by identifying the skills listed on the LinkedIn profiles of people who are getting hired at the highest rates. Only cities with 100,000 LinkedIn members were included.

Published in Social

 Source: This article was published business2community.com - Contributed by Member: Patrick Moore

In order to get more exposure for your personal brand, it’s important to know exactly what your target audience is seeking after. With the right research strategies in place, your business can attract more leads to your products or services.

LinkedIn is a premier networking resource as well as a warm lead generator. This large social network is an ideal platform for gathering information and conducting research for your niche. There are several ways your brand can attract the right leads for your business.

  • Connect with the right people – It’s important to be specific when gaining insights. Only seek after those who are in a related or similar field of interest, have influencer status, and are active both online and offline. Many times you can network at events, webinars, social media groups, Twitter chats, ect., which can open the doors to find targeted leads.
  • Take advantage of advanced search options – Use LinkedIn’s expanded queries to set up specific criteria – this includes people, jobs, content, companies, groups, and schools. Another method is to take a look at specific content that relates to your brand and conduct research on the author.
  • Create the new business or work opportunities – LinkedIn is an online portal to not only find jobs but also qualified candidates and new clients for your business. You can also see what your competitors are looking for inside your target market as it relates specifically to their skills and knowledge.
  • Become a trusted source through groups – Once you become a member of an active, professional group within your niche your brand can gain valuable feedback through asking and answering questions, sharing valuable insights and content, and posting videos and images that can add value to your community. This also applies to those who want to create their own professional group for even more networking opportunities.

LinkedIn is an ideal place for personal brands to link up with professionals in their industry as well as attract new leads. By being helpful, professional, and consistent your network will grow and attract more loyal followers to your brand. This is one of the few resources left where you can to gather insights and information on your industry and potential customers for free without the need to pay for advertising.

Published in How to

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Greg Sterling - Contributed by Member: Patrick Moore

New campaign finance rules require near real-time disclosure of data.

Google will pause state and local political ads in the state of Washington, according to an article appearing in GeekWire. That’s in response to a new campaign finance law that requires near “real-time disclosure of detailed information about election ads in response to public records requests.”

Here’s what Google said in its AdWords policy update:

Starting June 7th, 2018, ads related to ballot measures and state and local elections in the state of Washington, U.S.A., will not be accepted. Notifications will be sent to affected advertisers, and the Political content policy page will be updated on June 6th.

Google does not believe it’s currently able to comply with the new rules and so is not running the ads. LinkedIn has made a similar decision, however globally. Its policy now reads: “Political ads are prohibited, including ads advocating for or against a particular candidate or ballot proposition, or otherwise intended to influence an election outcome.”

Bing also generally does not allow ads with “political and religious content.”

The Washington state law, mandating new political ad disclosures and transparency requirements, is an effort to:

[S]implify the political reporting and enforcement process without sacrificing transparency and the public’s right to know who funds political campaigns. The legislature also intends to expedite the public disclosure commission’s enforcement procedures so that remedial campaign finance violations can be dealt with administratively.

This comes against the backdrop of “fake news” and election manipulation by outside and dark-money groups. The new Washington state rules require information about geotargeting, audience targeting and impressions, among other data. As indicated, the data must be contemporaneously available upon request.

Separately, Facebook and Google were sued this week by Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson for failing to comply with state records requirements for buyers of political ads. The state is seeking penalties, legal fees and injunctions against both Google and Facebook.

Published in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published blog.kissmetrics.com By Jonathan Cabin - Contributed by Member: Issac Avila

Have you ever been looking for something but didn’t know where to find it? If that something is online, then your search is over (or just about to begin). The following are 40 advanced and alternative search engines that you can use to find just about anything on the Internet. Use them to follow discussions about your industry, monitor your online reputation, and much more!

General Search

To start off our search adventure, let’s look at some general search engines beyond the top three.

DuckDuckGo

duckduckgo-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Concerned about online privacy? DuckDuckGo prides itself as being the search engine that does not track or personalize your searches and results. They even offer handy visual guides on Google tracking and filter bubbling. And if you’re an iOS user, you can set DuckDuckGo to be the default search engine in Safari. It’s also an option for Safari on MacOS.

Search Encrypt

search-encrypt-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Looking for an alternative to DuckDuckGo? Give Search Encrypt a try. Like DuckDuckGo, they are a privacy-based search engine. It includes a general search function, as well as image and video search.

Ecosia

Ecosia-homepage-december-2017 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Want trees planted while you search? That’s what Ecosia does! Simply run your normal searches and Ecosia will use its surplus income to conservationist organizations that plant trees. And you don’t have to sacrifice low-quality results to do good – Ecosia uses Bing and its own search algorithms.

Dogpile

dogpile LinkedIn - AOFIRS

If you want results from the top three search engines, but don’t want to go to them individually, try Dogpile. It’s results are pulled from the top three search engines “without all the mess.”

Blekko

blekko LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Want spam-free search results? Blekko‘s mission is to provide a differentiated, editorial voice in search. They look for quality over quantity, source-based authority over link-based, remove sites whose primary purpose is monetization over information, and uses human curating through the use of user tags.

WolframAlpha

wolframalpha LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Looking for a search engine based on computation and metrics? Try WolframAlpha. It will give you website data, historical information by date, unit conversions, stock data, sports statistics, and more. You can see examples by topicto learn more.

Gigablast

gigablast-homepage-2017 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Want an open-source search engine? Check out Gigablast. While it doesn’t always get things right, it does provide a retro look, results return quickly, and a feature similar to the now-defunct Google Instant.

Social Network-Specific Advanced Search

Need to find something specific on one of the top social networks? Here are some greatly advanced search pages.

Facebook Search

Want to see a particular search across different areas of Facebook? Use Facebook Advanced Search. When you type in your query, click on the “see more results” link at bottom of the suggestions. Then use the filters on the left to see results within people, pages, places, groups, and more.

LinkedIn People Search

linkedin-people-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

If you want to find some new connections on LinkedIn, use the Advanced People Search. This will let you narrow down your results by the above plus relationship and language. Premium members will have access to additional search filters including groups, company size, years of experience, and more.

LinkedIn Job Search

linkedin-job-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

LinkedIn offers job seekers an Advanced Job Search to find jobs using the above information plus experience level and industry. Premium members can narrow their search down further by the salary offered.

LinkedIn Answers Search

linkedin-answers-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

LinkedIn Answers is a great way to gain exposure and build authority in your industry. Use the Answers Advanced Search to find the perfect questions to answer.

Twitter Search

twitter-advanced-search-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Twitter’s Advanced Search is a great way to find better results on Twitter. It is especially great for businesses looking for a local audience by allowing them to filter their results using the Near this place field.

Social Search

The following search engines will allow you to search one or more social networks in one place and gain additional data about the results.

Keyhole

keyhole-homepage-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Keyhole allows you to search for hashtags, keywords, @mentions, and URLs. Want to see how your latest blog post was shared across social networks? Just select URL on Keyhole and put in the URL and you’ll see who has shared it.

Social Mention

socialmention LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Social Mention allows you to search across multiple types of networks including blogs, microblogs, bookmarks, comments, events, images, news, and more.

Buzzsumo

buzzsumo-homepage-2016 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Use Buzzsumo if you have a topic in mind and want to see which articles on the web were most shared for that particular search. There is a paid version that can give you access to more tools for each topic.

Forums

Want to participate in forums in your industry? Use this search engine to find results specifically on forums.

Boardreader

boardreader LinkedIn - AOFIRS

BoardReader allows you to search forums and narrow results down by date (last day through last year) and language.

Blogs

Find industry-related blogs and posts using the following search engines.

Regator

regator LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Regator allows you to search for blogs and posts on any topic, then narrow down your results by posts with audio or video, date range, topic, and domain.

Documents, eBooks, and Presentations

If you’re looking for documents, eBooks, presentations, or other similar file types, try the following searches.

Google Advanced Search

file-type-in-google-advanced-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Google Advanced Search allows you to search for specific types of documents. Looking specifically for PDFs? Set that as your criteria. Want to search for Word docs or Powerpoint presentations? Then tell Google to find those file types.

Scribd

scribd-marketing-search-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Scribd is the largest social reading and publishing network that allows you to discover original written content across the web. Sort results by category, language, length, file types, upload date, and cost (free or for sale).

SlideShare

slideshare LinkedIn - AOFIRS

SlideShare is the largest community for sharing presentations. If you missed a conference or webinar, there’s a good chance the slides from your favorite speakers are here.

Image Search

Looking for beautiful images? Try these image search engines – note that you must gain permission to use any images you find unless they are specifically marked as Creative Commons licensed.

Flickr

flickr LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Flickr offers an advanced search screen that allows you to find photos, screenshots, illustrations, and videos on their network. You can also search within Creative Commons-licensed content.

Pinterest

whales-pinterest-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

The ultimate image platform, Pinterest allows you to search for anything visual – clothing, cars, floors, airplanes, etc and pin it to your favorites. Just be sure you don’t steal copyright work. You will need to have an account before you can begin searching.

Bing

bing-image-homepage-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Bing offers an image search that starts out with the top trending images, then leads to images which can be filtered by size, layout, and other criteria. They also display tabs above the results with related search queries.

Google

google-advanced-image-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Google Advanced Image Search allows you to get even more specific about the images you are looking for, including specifying whether they are faces, photos, clip arts, or line drawings. You can also search within images labeled for reuse commercially and with modifications.

TinEye

tineye-image-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Have you seen an image around the web and want to know where it came from? That’s what TinEye is for. Just put your image in the search box and TinEye will find where that image has been seen from around the web.

Creative Commons Media

Need to find media created by others to use on your website? Try these Creative Commons searches.

Creative Commons

creative-commons LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Looking for only images that you can repurpose, use for commercial purposes, or modify? Try the Creative Commons Search which will allow you to look through multiple sources including Flickr, Google Images, Wikimedia, and YouTube.

Wikimedia

wikimedia-commons LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Wikimedia Commons has over 12 million files in their database of freely usable images, sound bites, and videos. Use the search box or browse by categories for different types of media.

Video Search

Looking for a video to embed on your website or simply entertain you? Try these video search engines that look across multiple sources to find what you need.

Yahoo

yahoo-video LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Yahoo Video Search allows you to search through video content from their own network, YouTube, Dailymotion, Metacafe, Myspace, Hulu, and other online video providers for videos on any topic.

360Daily

360daily-homepage-2018 LinkedIn - AOFIRS

360Daily allows you to go beyond YouTube to find videos on any topic from hundreds of sites including big names like YouTube and Hulu. If you’re looking for a video, you’ll likely find it here.

AOL Video aggregates the day's best clips from around the web, but you can also use it as a search engine.

Google Video

google-video-search-marketing LinkedIn - AOFIRS

With Google Video Search you’ll be able to search for videos on any topic and filter your results by duration, the date when uploaded, video source, and much more.

Website Data & Statistics

Looking for information about your favorite brands and websites? Try out these search engines for data and statistics.

CrunchBase

crunchbase LinkedIn - AOFIRS

CrunchBase offers insight into your favorite online brands and companies. Listings will tell you people who are associated with a company, contact information, related videos, screenshots, and more.

SimilarWeb

similarweb-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

SimilarWeb allows you to search for website or app profiles based specific domains or app names. Domains with a high volume of traffic will have data including total regional visitors per month, pageviews online vs. mobile, demographics, sites similar audiences like, and more.

BuiltWith

builtwith LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Curious to see what technology your favorite sites use and usage trends of that technology? BuiltWith allows you to search for domains and see the technology they use, including analytics, content management systems, coding, and widgets. You can also click on any of the products to see usage trends, industries using the technology, and more.

Advanced Google

Can’t get away from Google, but want to get more out of it than a simple Google.com search? Try these advanced Google search features.

Google Advanced Search

google-advanced-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Looking for something specific? Try Google Advanced Search or use Advanced Operators in your search queries.

Google Scholar

google-scholar LinkedIn - AOFIRS

If you are looking for articles, theses, books, abstracts, court opinions or other information provided by academic publishers, professional societies, and university, try Google Scholar Advanced Search. You can also use Advanced Operators to refine your search results even more.

Google Books

google-book-search LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Google Advanced Book Search will help you find search queries in books. You can also find entire books published online that might be available to download via PDF (when in the public domain).

Google Search Features

google-search-features LinkedIn - AOFIRS

Need to check stock quotes, the time in another city, sports scores, or other specific information? The Google Search Features page allows you to search for everyday essentials, local listings, health information, and much more.

Published in Search Engine

Need to find a job? These are the best job search engines on the web

If you're in the market for a new job, you'll want to check out this list of the best eight job search engines on the web. All of these job search tools offer unique features and can streamline your employment search efforts so your efforts are more productive. Each one is an incredibly useful tool that will help you localize your search, find interesting new positions that correlate to your experience and interests, and help you to find employment in a wide variety of genres. 

1- Monster.com

Monster Logo
Monster

Newly redesigned Monster.com is one of the oldest job search engines on the Web. While some of its usefulness has been diminished in recent years due to a lack of good filtering and too many posts by spammy recruiters, it's still an important site on which to conduct a job search. You can narrow your search by location, keywords, and employer; plus, Monster has plenty of job search extras: networking boards, job search alerts, and online resume posting.

Employers can also use Monster.com to find employees for a nominal fee, a useful tool for those looking to expand their hiring repertoire, find a new full-time or contract employee, or gather a pool of potential applicants for an upcoming position.  More »

Indeed logo
Indeed

Indeed.com is a very solid job search engine, with the ability to compile a resume and submit it onsite for employer searches of keywords, jobs, niches, and more. Indeed uncovers a wide variety of jobs and fields that you wouldn't normally find on most job search sites, and they do a good job of making their job search features as easy to use as possible. You can subscribe to job alerts via email; you can set these up for a certain keyword, geolocation, salary, and much more. 

In addition, Indeed makes it as simple as possible to keep track of jobs you've applied for; all you need to do is create a login (free) and every job you've applied for from within Indeed.com or that you've just expressed interest in will be saved to your profile. 

Daily and weekly alerts can be created with notifications going to your inbox; criteria include job title, location, salary requirements, and skill sets.  More »

USAJobs
USA Jobs

Think of USAjobs as your gateway into the huge world of US government jobs. Navigate to the USAjobs.gov home page, and you'll be able to narrow your search by keyword, job title, control number, agency skills, or location. One particularly interesting feature is the ability to search worldwide within any country that currently is advertising a vacancy. 

Just like many other job search engines on this list, you can create a user account (free) on USAjobs.gov, making the application process for government jobs extremely streamlined and easy.  More »

CareerBuilder Logo
Career Builder

CareerBuilder offers job searchers the ability to find a job, post a resume, create job alerts, get job advice and job resources, look up job fairs, and much more. This is a truly massive job search engine that offers a lot of good resources to the job searcher; I especially appreciate the list of job search communities. 

According to the CareerBuilder website, more than 24 million unique visitors a month visit CareerBuilder to find new jobs and obtain career advice, and offers job searches in over 60 different countries worldwide.  More »

5- Dice

DiceLogo
Dice

Dice.com is a job search engine dedicated to only finding technology jobs. It offers a targeted niche space for finding exactly the technology position you might be looking for.

One of the most appealing features that Dice offers is the ability to drill down to extremely specialized tech positions, giving job seekers the opportunity to find the niche tech jobs that are sometimes elusive on other job search engines.  More »

6- SimplyHired

SimplyHired Screenshot
Simply Hired

SimplyHired also offers a unique job search experience; the user trains the job search engine by rating jobs he or she is interested in. SimplyHired also gives you the ability to research salaries, add jobs to a job map, and view pretty detailed profiles of various companies.

If you're looking for a good job search engine that focuses on local job listings, SimplyHired can be a good choice. You can browse by town, by zip code, or by state to find the job that might be right for you.   More »

7- LinkedIn

linked in logo
LinkedIN

LinkedIn.com combines the best of two worlds: the ability to scour the Internet for jobs with its job search engine, and the opportunity to network with like-minded friends and individuals to deepen your job search.

LinkedIn's job postings are of the highest quality, and if you are connected to someone who already knows about that particular job, you've got a way in before you even hand in your resume.  More »

8- Craigslist

Craigslist logo
Craigslist

There are all sorts of interesting jobs on Craigslist. Just find your city, look under Jobs, then look under your job category. Non-profit, systems, government, writing, etc. jobs are all represented here.

You can also set up various RSS feeds that pertain to whatever job you might be looking for, in whatever location.

Caution: Craigslist this is a free marketplace and some of the jobs posted at on this site could be scams. Use caution and common sense when replying to job listings on Craigslist.  More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Search Engine

In my work as a writer and career coach, I spend a great deal of time on LinkedIn. I review hundreds of profiles a month, including those of new colleagues, potential clients, podcast guests, speaking agents, journalists, thought leaders and more. I also train my clients and course members how to communicate more powerfully, and build stronger LinkedIn content that elicits interest and follow up.

This work allows me a window into “seeing” people’s real personalities, challenges, and blocks through their writing. What I’ve learned is this: How you do LinkedIn is how you do your professional life.   And if you're not careful, your LinkedIn profile shares aspects of your professional life and how you view yourself that you won’t want others to know.

Here are five things your LinkedIn profile reveals that you’re probably not aware of (and will want to change).

#1: You’re hiding

If you don’t have a photo up on your profile, you’re hiding, plain and simple. LinkedIn is the world's largest professional network with more than 530 million users in over 200 countries and territories. With that volume of activity, many users undoubtedly would be interested in what you stand for and care about in your work. But without a photo on your profile, you’re saying “Don’t see me. Just pass me over. I’m not important or worthy enough for you to see my face.”

Tip: This week, take a photo (or have someone take it of you) – face front, smiling – and upload it. Make it professional (no bathing suits, etc.). This is a professional platform, not a dating app. Also, upload a great cover image (a photo for the banner at the top of your page) that represents something that will tell us more about you, what you care about, and why we should care. Always keep in mind who you want to engage with, and make sure your content will connect with people you'll be excited to talk to.

#2: You’re not passionate about your work

It’s clear how you feel about your work by the words you use to explain it. If you choose words that are drab, boring, passive, unclear –without any indication of what lights you up from the inside – then the message is that you don’t like your work. People who have deep passion for their field and endeavors communicate that with a vitality and energy that speaks volumes about how much they’re connected to what they’re doing.

Tip: Go through your profile, and replace every single word that is boring, repetitive, overused and uninspired. Find a way to talk about what you do so that people can say “Wow! She loves what she does and is good at it!” (If you can’t do that no matter how hard you try, it’s indicative that you’re in the wrong career, job or employer.)

#3: You don’t know your value or what you’re great at

I can’t tell you how many professionals miss the boat in terms of failing to share exciting, juicy facts of who they are, what they’ve done and the “needles” they moved in their roles. You need to communicate on LinkedIn exactly what you do that brings about important outcomes that help the company thrive or grow. And you need to communicate how you do what you do in ways that are different from how anyone else on the planet would do it.

Tip: Spend this weekend sitting quietly without distractions, and write down everything that’s made you who you are (your ancestry, cultural training, achievements, traumas, pivotal moments, relationships that flattened you and those that enlivened you, your passions and talents, and unique perspectives, etc.) Then connect the dots. Answer the question “How has every one of these influences shaped me in a way that makes me a powerful, valuable contributor to the work I do?”

Write down the "20 facts of you" – what you’ve accomplished, achieved and made possible, and the scope of those achievements (with metrics that illustrate the impact) and why these outcomes mattered to the organization. Sharing these facts is not bragging. It's helping people understand what you're capable of and how that's of use in the world.

#4: You’re seeking employment but don’t know how or where to look

When you write your headline with the words “Looking for opportunities” or “Seeking employment” you’re shooting yourself in the foot. You’re focused on what you’re lacking (a job) whereas your profile should be written to highlight what you have to offer. Write it with the express intent of engaging the reader. Your headline is the place for you to tell the world WHY they should hire you, HOW you’re unique and valuable, and WHAT is vitally important about your career trajectory and experience that others should take heed of because it will be useful for them. And make sure you are crystal clear about what you can do going forward, not just recite your past history.

 Tip: Never use your headline to talk about looking for opportunities. That’s a given. We’re all looking for opportunities there. Use that precious real estate to share what you do, who you do it for, and the outcomes you’re passionate about bringing forward.

#5: You’re not sure why your work matters

Finally, if you list only the tasks that you’ve performed and not the “what happened” after these tasks were accomplished, you’re leaving us guessing about why your work matters. Make it clear that the work you do has an impact, and can continue to make a difference in other situations, opportunities, and employers. You’re more than just your current job (please recognize that), but if you don’t share how you can apply your talents and abilities in ways that move organizations forward, the reader can’t envision exciting future possibilities for you.

Tip: Make sure that everything you write is not task-oriented, but benefit-focused. And share most about what you love doing, not the boring, mundane work you never want to do again. Every word you write has the power to attract you more of same. So if 80% of your work makes you feel dead inside, then emphasize the 20% that makes you feel alive, important and valuable in the world.

Source: This article was published forbes.com By Kathy Caprino

Published in Social

What are your most effective sources for finding talent? Do you leverage job postings? Ask for employee referrals?

These are both successful ways to fill a position. In fact, each one can play an integral role in your recruiting.

The only downside is that they’re reactive. You have to wait for the talent to come to you, in hopes that the right candidate is among them.

What you need is the ability to aggressively seek and go after ideal candidates. You need to build an active pipeline to fill today’s requisitions, make connections for hard-to-fill roles, and prepare for future needs.

You need to be proactive.

Luckily, there are several sourcing techniques you can start leveraging right now:

Boolean Sourcing for Google

Boolean sourcing allows recruiters to search for candidate information from all over the web.

You can find resumes and cover letters that are stored within personal websites, job boards and social platforms by using a unique set of search commands.

These commands tell search engines exactly what you’re looking for, and help drill down your search results to reveal the candidates who truly align with your requisition.

Getting started with boolean sourcing is as simple as learning some basic commands. The following operators work best when used within Google.

OR The command OR will return results containing at least one of your specified keywords or phrases. For example, entering programmer OR developer OR engineer would produce results containing any of these terms but not necessarily all of them.
"" Use quotations to return sites containing the exact phrase you’re searching for. For example, the senior manager would return pages containing either of these keywords, but "senior manager" would only return pages containing that exact phrase.
- Use the minus or dash command "-" before a keyword to return pages that exclude that word. For example, if you searched "marketing -manager" your results would exclude any pages that contain the word manager.
* Use the asterisk (*) within your query to identify a placeholder or wildcard terms. For example "Master's degree in *" would return pages containing the phrase "Master's degree in Marketing," "Master's degree in Computer Science, " etc.
() Brackets are for grouping Boolean phrases, and are generally used in more complex search strings. For example, if you searched for (Engineer or "Software Developer")(CISCO OR Microsoft OR HP), your results would show pages containing any of your job title keywords that also contain one of the company keywords. This is a great combination for finding talent who has worked for one of your target competitors.
site: Use the command site: to search pages within a specific website. For example, search for Facebook profiles by entering site:facebook.com. Searching for site:facebook.com "web designers" Phoenix would return Facebook profiles containing both keywords Web Designer and Phoenix.


Use these basic commands to create more elaborate search strings and effectively find candidates through Google. By adding more criteria to your search queries, you can produce more relevant results and ultimately find the best candidates who align with your job.

Job Board Sourcing

You can also leverage most online job boards to proactively source your candidates. Look for the option to search or source the job board's resume database by using common keywords your prospects would use.

Social Sourcing

Leverage the social platforms where your prospects already spend a lot of their time. Sites like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook offer unique tools to proactively find your next great hire.

In March 2013, Facebook released Graph Search. It’s a free tool that allows anyone to use specific queries to search for individuals. Find people who work for a specific industry, near a special location or for a particular company.

Here is an example of a common Facebook Graph query:
Facebook Graph

Twitter is also a great tool for sourcing candidates. Use its search engine to identify professionals by specific keywords, phrases, and locations. The best part is that Twitter is an open network, so you’re free to connect with anyone.

You can also find candidates on LinkedIn by using the Boolean logic you’ve already learned. After you replace the italicized words with your keywords, enter this powerful search string into Google to return precise LinkedIn profiles:
site:linkedin.com "web designer" "location * Greater Phoenix Area"

Go After Your Talent

Identifying qualified candidates is the most critical part of the recruiting process. It can also be the most difficult—especially if you're waiting around for the right job seekers to apply. Instead, set yourself up for success by proactively finding them yourself.

But before you get started with methods like Boolean, job board, and social sourcing, make sure you have a clear understanding of the job you’re recruiting for and the keywords your prospects may use during their job search.

Knowing how your candidates describe themselves and which terms resonate with them will give you a head start on your proactive search for talent.

Initiate Conversation

When you finally find the candidates you’re looking for, connect with them! Send them a message about your available position and ask if they would be interested in the opportunity. For more tips on reaching out to candidates, read Candidate Sourcing: Get More Replies to Your Contact Emails.

Published in Research Methods
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