fbpx
×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 1564

Google is undeniably king of the search engine world, but other engines are worth talking about, especially when it comes to privacy. In the second in a series of blog posts reviewing alternative search engines, I find out more about DuckDuckGo.

Following the review of Ecosia in celebration of Earth Day, the next search engine I’m reviewing is DuckDuckGo, so get your disguise on as we’re going incognito. No, literally. This search engine sells itself on its tight privacy controls. With the roll out of the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) in May 2018, privacy is a subject being discussed more and more, and the conversations could lead to consumers becoming more aware of their privacy and data protection rights.

What’s it all about then?

DuckDuckGo vs Google - Dog HidingDuckDuckGo states it will not track your IP address or user agent when you’re searching, nor does it share or collect any personally identifiable information about its users. So if you are concerned about your data being collected, and sold on for marketing purposes, or even used for criminal activities – this might be the search engine for you.

The privacy limits extend to not tracking you, as you go in and out of private browsing mode. You’re staying under the radar. Don’t you worry.

Duck, duck, wild goose chase – how is the search functionality?

You can adjust the settings, much like other search engines, to filter the results you see. You may choose seeing results that are safe, moderate, or no holds barred, to customise it to your preferences. You can further refine results by selecting your country, and by allowing content from a certain time period to appear.

DuckDuckGo vs Google - SERPs - Browser Media

It is interesting to see that the only exact replication of results is where Browser Media sits, nicely in position two. The results are different, but both SERPS are serving helpful results, except both engines did return non-UK businesses on page one – Google returned a Denver based business and DuckDuckGo served up a Delhi and Brisbane based business, as well as the same Denver business:

DuckDuckGo vs Google - SERPs 2 - Browser Media

Because your IP address is not being tracked, no specific location criteria are used in the searches via DuckDuckGo. This means you may not find the coffee shop around the corner, unless you specify where you are looking for said coffee shop within your search query.

Additionally, search history is not taken into account. So, whilst it feels much less creepy than other engines, it also won’t be so tailored to your searching habits. You will see the same page of results as the next person using DuckDuckGo when entering identical search terms.

 

I’ve been digging around a bit to find out what people think of the results DuckDuckGo returns, and it is a fairly mixed response.

DuckDuckGo vs Google - review - browser media

via sitejabber.com

One comment referred to DuckDuckGo changing the search titles and returning incoherent results. So instead of returning pages showing the price of gold, when the user typed in GLD (the investment symbol for gold), the search title was changed to God.

Other comments referred to small irritations when getting the results back. For example, not listing the number of results found, so the searcher is not helped in regards to whether their search should be expanded or filtered differently. As well, complaints have been made about the engine hijacking results when a user tried to use a different engine. Further to this, ‘apparently’ the engine became incredibly tricky to get rid of, not showing up in the program or app lists on desktops and devices.

On the flipside, the review site has many comments defending DDG, with users stating that they found the results to be appropriate, and it was just a case of learning how to use the engine better. I would tend to agree, queries may simply need a word or two added to serve up better results.

DuckDuckGo vs Google - review 2 - browser media

via sitejabber.com

There was also the usual amount of conspiracy theory talk – suggesting that certain search engines are paying folk to write false negative reviews. Such cynics…

How are they doing?

DuckDuckGo vs Google - number of search queries - browser media

via duckduckgo.com/traffic.html

It is hard to gauge how many users DuckDuckGo has since it does not track personal information…

…but we do know that it received over 16.2 million search queries on Monday 24 April.

Therefore, using some pretty basic maths, I have deduced that DuckDuckGo had 188 searches per second on average that day:

16,249,713 ÷ 86,400 (number of seconds in 24 hours) = 188.08

In comparison, Google averages 40,000 enquiries per second.

DuckDuckGo is placed next to Google Hungary, Croatia, and Nepal in the percentage market share tables – and just below Ask that has 0.14% share.

DuckDuckGo vs Google - DuckDuckGo's marketshare - browser media

via netmarketshare.com

DuckDuckGo vs Google - devices - browser media

Quack to the future – what impact could DuckDuckGo have on marketers?

Data from Google Analytics about DuckDuckGo will not particularly benefit marketers since no useful visitor information is tracked. It means you can’t mark your target audience based on age, gender, nor location, for example.

In addition, the engine is reported as referral traffic, rather than organic, which can be misleading when analysing traffic, but can be changed with an advanced segment. A rule is required to instruct Google Analytics that each time DuckDuckGo is seen as referral traffic, to change the medium to organic. For more on advanced segments, read Libby’s blog post on the subject. For further details specifically about the issue described above, this piece should help.

If you’re interested in paid search, bear in mind that they don’t do remarketing ads. Sponsored ads, much like all of the other engines, will appear at the top of the SERP. However, due to the audience seeing the ads being an unknown, how can anyone be sure the ads are being seen by the right audience? It seems a bit pot luck for my liking.

 

Although, with the GDPR roll out next year, perhaps this engine is wise not to be keeping records on its users. And if, as a consumer, you’re concerned about your privacy when browsing the internet, and do not want to be tracked when carrying out searches, this engine is the one for you.

This article was published in browsermedia.co.uk

Categorized in Search Engine

When Gabriel Weinberg became sick of Google search results and being tracked everywhere he went online, he took action. The developer created add-ons to limit his personal information being collected, and this small list evolved into the increasingly popular anonymous search engine DuckDuckGo.

Almost seven years after founding the company, DuckDuckGo has become a staple search engine for the privacy-conscious. In January, Weinberg and his now 35-person strong team, announced DuckDuckGo had provided answers to more than ten billion search queries. These numbers are nowhere near those celebrated by Google, Bing, or Yahoo; Google alone has 3.5 billion searches a day, but the 38-year-old has ambitions to grow beyond search. "We've had a very narrow focus for the life of the company because it has been hard to get the product to where it needs to be," Weinbergtold WIRED.

"We're thinking of what else we can do to expand the proposition and give people more of a holistic privacy solution. We haven't made any total move but it's where we're heading; we're thinking more generally how can we do more to protect your privacy when you're browsing around the web."

DuckDuckGo was founded by internet entrepreneur Gabriel Weinberg in 2008 as a privacy-focussed alternative to Google

DuckDuckGo

Weinberg didn't elaborate on any specific products or services, but said it "probably won't" be email. The development may, instead, be closer to a web browsingexperience. "Like when you click off the search engine and you're taken to somewhere else on the web," he explained. "If we can make that experience more private for you, that's what we're thinking of".

The rise of DuckDuck go has been slow, or "steady", as Weinberg describes it. He admits one of the dominant challenges for the firm is marketing itself in a populist way. In 2011, Weinberg purchased a billboard for $7,000 (£5,600)pointing out the company, unlike Google, does not track those who use its search functions.

Despite difficulties in getting the firm widely known, DuckDuckGo has seen a number of mainstream successes: Apple included it as a default search option with iOS 8 in Safari in September 2014, Mozilla followed suit, including DuckDuckGo in Firefox in November of the same year. It also exists on Tor.

For now, Weinberg says development will continue on the core search features of DuckDuckGo. Like Google, the service tries to provide instant answers to your questions. If you're looking for a local cinema the firms will try to show the number and opening times; if you're searching for who was the UK prime minister in 1973 they will try to tell you.

"When you're looking for more things like breaking news or a phone number for a restaurant, especially internationally, we're making that experience better for users," he continued.

The entrepreneur expects the popularity of anonymous search to continue to grow and says he is worried about online surveillance laws around the world, including the UK's Investigatory Powers Act. Unsurprisingly, for the creator of a privacy-enhancing website, he says laws around the world are "unsettling".

"For the majority of people, I think they're just looking for simple ways to be tracked less online".

Source : wired.co.uk

Categorized in Search Engine

“Just Google it”. There are few other phrases that demonstrate just how ubiquitous Google search has become. Google is so popular that people are either unaware other search engines exist or just unwilling to use them and to be fair there are good reasons for that. Google’s service is excellent, it is integrated with their browser (chrome) and all of their other services (Drive, gmail, google docs etc.) The fact is, for a long time Google has just been better than the competition. That being said there are many reasons one might want to try a different service. Maybe you are trying to “De-googilfy” your life, maybe you find one provider controlling all of your services uncomfortable or maybe you’re just curious about the alternatives. Whatever your reason, I’d like to introduce you to a relative newcomer to the Search Engine scene, DuckDuckGo.

 

DuckduckGo is billed as the privacy browser or “The search engine that doesn’t track you” to use their words. This is a pretty powerful hook, in fact it’s the main reason that I decided to try it out in the first place. It was founded in 2008 but it really started growing in 2012 when it first hit 1 million searches a day. The search engine has really spread it’s wings since then and now has over 13,000,000 searches a day. Growth spurred in part by the Snowden leaks.

So, how does DuckDuckGo compare to Google Search? Well, lets find out.

SEARCH RESULTS

The most important aspect of a search engine is of course the results. At first glance it seems like Google has the edge over DuckDuckGo. Google results are constantly updated, meaning that you will get a far larger number of results when searching through them than when using DuckDuckGo.  Google also keeps track of what you are searching and attempts to ensure things that would interest you reach the top of your results and to do it’s best to make sure everything you see is relevant to you personally.

This has its pitfalls however. Google’s methods means they can create a “filter bubble” and you tend to find that sponsored content at the top of your list.

In comparison, DuckDuckGo doesn’t list its findings based on your previous searches and only on your keyword. This means that you tend to get the official website first rather than sponsored content but you will get far less results than you would using Google and sometimes the results aren’t quite what you were looking for.

Overall, I would say that Google has the edge here because you can get a better variety of results but DuckDuckGo’s results will always try to find you the official, rather than sponsored, link first and does prevent you from being trapped in a filter bubble.

PRIVACY

DuckDuckGo’s focus is on building a “private” environment for its users. DuckDuckGo have promised not to collect any data on their users. They also take active steps to prevent “search leakage”. The phenomenon where, when you click on a result from a search engine to get into a website, it gives that website your IP address, browser information and search terms used to find them. This allows websites to find out how you found them, but also means they collect a great deal of information about the visitors to their site. DuckDuckGo does not collect any information on its user and so it cannot sell any information to third party advertisers or be compelled to hand this information over to Law Enforcement agencies.

Google on the other hand focuses on building a “personalized” environment for its users. This requires Google to collect a lot of information on its users browsing habits, including keywords, IP addresses and previously visited sites. This allows Google to deliver the content that is most relevant to you. It also allows Google to sell your information to advertisers so that they can deliver targeted ads to you that they believe you will find most ‘useful’.

DuckDuckGo is clearly the browser for privacy minded users but this means that it looses a lot of Google’s “personal touch” and the information you find  will be more generic.

EXTRA FEATURES

When it comes to extras both browsers are come with an impressive arsenal. Google features significantly better search controls than its smaller competitor and everything is integrated with other Google services, providing a seamless web experience. You have easy access to services such as Google flights and maps and the search engine is tailored to how you use it, which is pretty cool. The downside is that this means all of your eggs are in one basket and you’re pretty much trapped in Google’s ecosystem.

DuckDuckGo has a whole host of features that Google doesn’t possess. One of the coolest of these is !bangs. Bangs are a feature that allow you to search directly on a site through DuckDuckGo. Lets say that you need to find a video and you know it is on Youtube. You can type “!yt cute cat videos” and DuckDuckGo will search Youtube directly for you, saving you valuable cat watching seconds. DuckDuckGo is also significantly more customizable than Google, you can change your background, layout, style, font and text color to suit your own needs or aesthetic desires.

DuckDuckGo also comes with an array of special search terms, you can search for social media profiles, alternatives to certain services, calculate the price of a loan, check whether a website is up as well as a lot of other cool stuff. Google does offer some of these services but not all.

When it comes the search tools themselves, Google does have some tricks up its sleeves. In particular Google has much more powerful filters that allow you to set any number of parameters to filter your results by. Google also has a lot more search categories, you can search by book, news, scholarly articles etc. Which gives it an edge.

SO, WHICH IS BETTER?

To be honest it’s a tough one. Both Google and DuckDuckGo are really solid search engines and it really depends on what you want out of your web experience.

If you want personalized results, don’t mind your information being tracked to improve your experience and want as wide a range of results as possible, stick with Google.

If you want as much privacy as you can get, are interested in open source and want to ensure you get the official sites first and want to separate your services, then DuckDuckGo is the choice for you.

Personally, I started using DuckDuckGo a year ago. over time it became my primary search engine and now I would struggle to go back to using Google full-time, especially with the knowledge of how much of my privacy I sign away to use their services. I will be the first to admit that DuckDuckGo isn’t perfect and there are occasions where I am forced to !g my searches but it is improving all the time.

DuckDuckGo is a great alternative to Google and if you are at all interested in protecting your privacy I would recommend giving it a go.

Author : SAUL BOWDEN

Source : geekreply.com

Categorized in Search Engine

DuckDuckGo has had a banner year, serving a total of more then 10 billion search queries at the end of 2016, and reaching a milestone of 14 million searches in a single day in January 2017.

With its search engine business being firmly on the rise, DuckDuckGo tells Wired it has plans to be more than just that. The 7-year-old company with a 35-person team aspires to grow its privacy solutions beyond search.

Founder Gabriel Weinberg says:

”We’re thinking of what else we can do to expand the proposition and give people more of a holistic privacy solution. We haven’t made any total move but it’s where we’re heading; we’re thinking more generally how can we do more to protect your privacy when you’re browsing around the web.”

 

Although Weinberg is vague on what exactly that means, he has ruled out the possibility of an e-mail service. Rather, he’s looking into ways to keep users’ information secure as they click off DuckDuckGo and visit other sites on the web. 

“Like when you click off the search engine and you’re taken to somewhere else on the web… If we can make that experience more private for you, that’s what we’re thinking of”.

Until then, the company will continue to focus on its core search capabilities. Specifically, it wants to improve its ability to deliver instant answers similar to how Google does when you ask it a question.

Admittedly, the company faces an awareness problem. Despite being available on Chrome, Safari, and Firefox as a default search engine option, many searchers still do not know it exists. Its growth thus far can be mainly attributed to the those who are looking for an alternative to being tracked online.

As the founder puts it:

”For the majority of people, I think they’re just looking for simple ways to be tracked less online”.

Author : Matt Southern

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/duckduckgo-plans-just-search-engine/185687/

Categorized in Search Engine

When Gabriel Weinberg became sick of Google search results and being tracked everywhere he went online, he took action. The developer created add-ons to limit his personal information being collected, and this small list evolved into the increasingly popular anonymous search engine DuckDuckGo.

Almost seven years after founding the company, DuckDuckGo has become a staple search engine for the privacy-conscious. In January, Weinberg and his now 35-person strong team, announced DuckDuckGo had provided answers to more than ten billion search queries. These numbers are nowhere near those celebrated by Google, Bing, or Yahoo; Google alone has 3.5 billion searches a day, but the 38-year-old has ambitions to grow beyond search. "We've had a very narrow focus for the life of the company because it has been hard to get the product to where it needs to be," Weinberg told WIRED.

"We're thinking of what else we can do to expand the proposition and give people more of a holistic privacy solution. We haven't made any total move but it's where we're heading; we're thinking more generally how can we do more to protect your privacy when you're browsing around the web."

DuckDuckGo was founded by internet entrepreneur Gabriel Weinberg in 2008 as a privacy-focussed alternative to Google

DuckDuckGo was founded by internet entrepreneur Gabriel Weinberg in 2008 as a privacy-focussed alternative to Google

Weinberg didn't elaborate on any specific products or services, but said it "probably won't" be email. The development may, instead, be closer to a web browsingexperience. "Like when you click off the search engine and you're taken to somewhere else on the web," he explained. "If we can make that experience more private for you, that's what we're thinking of".

 

The rise of DuckDuck go has been slow, or "steady", as Weinberg describes it. He admits one of the dominant challenges for the firm is marketing itself in a populist way. In 2011, Weinberg purchased a billboard for $7,000 (£5,600)pointing out the company, unlike Google, does not track those who use its search functions.

Despite difficulties in getting the firm widely known, DuckDuckGo has seen a number of mainstream successes: Apple included it as a default search option with iOS 8 in Safari in September 2014, Mozilla followed suit, including DuckDuckGo in Firefox in November of the same year. It also exists on Tor.

For now, Weinberg says development will continue on the core search features of DuckDuckGo. Like Google, the service tries to provide instant answers to your questions. If you're looking for a local cinema the firms will try to show the number and opening times; if you're searching for who was the UK prime minister in 1973 they will try to tell you.

"When you're looking for more things like breaking news or a phone number for a restaurant, especially internationally, we're making that experience better for users," he continued.

The entrepreneur expects the popularity of anonymous search to continue to grow and says he is worried about online surveillance laws around the world, including the UK's Investigatory Powers Act. Unsurprisingly, for the creator of a privacy-enhancing website, he says laws around the world are "unsettling".

"For the majority of people, I think they're just looking for simple ways to be tracked less online".

Author : MATT BURGESS

Source : http://www.wired.co.uk/article/duckduckgo-what-is-it-how-does-it-work

Categorized in Search Engine

Of course you know about Google, Yahoo, Bing and AOL, but have you heard of the DuckDuckGo search engine? Well, it’s an internet search engine that emphasizes protecting searchers’ privacy and avoiding the “filter bubble” of personalized search results.

A Look at the DuckDuckGo Search Engine

The “filter bubble” is a term coined by internet activist Eli Pariser to refer to the selective information that search engines present to users based on variances such as location, past click behavior and search history. That means that different results are shown to different people. Not everyone who searches for a particular topic sees the same results. While this might be beneficial at certain times, the filter bubble also can isolate and deter you from seeing the entire picture.  DuckDuckGo doesn’t have a filter bubble. And the ability to switch which local region you’re searching in gives you more options and ultimately, a truer search.

 

While its main draw is lack of a filter bubble, DuckDuckGo has another killer feature you may not have heard of – !bangs. By simply appending “!g” or “!google” in the search box you will be taken immediately to the Google search engine. If you type !stackoverflow, !wikipedia or a large number of other similarly well-known web destinations, the DuckDuckGo will bring up these respective websites too. This is pretty clever stuff!

The search engine also doesn’t follow you around with ads.

The anonymous DuckDuckGo search engine provides small businesses with a safe way to search the web along some useful features.

Here’s a scenario; you search for restaurants and go through a few. The next time you want to search for something, the search engine will show you targeted restaurant ads. This could be useful for a variety of reasons, but it is typically a monetization strategy. However, DuckDuckGo keeps a clean, clutter-free interface at all times. “We don’t store your search history,” says the company on their main search page. “We therefore have nothing to sell to advertisers that track you across the internet.”

The downside with this search engine, however, is that it’s not as intuitive as Google when it comes to news. The search engine doesn’t seem to have a section that’s specifically dedicated to News.

Overall, DuckDuckGo is definitely one of the more private search engines around. Its clean design, lack of filter bubble and ibangs makes it a useful research tool if — you need to get out of your bubble and explore some new things on the web..

Author : Antony Maina

Source : https://smallbiztrends.com/2017/01/duckduckgo-search-engine.html

Categorized in Business Research

Search engines have evolved to make it easier to find any information you need without having to go through different websites. Google is undoubtedly the more popular search engine that has many cool features, but you should know that it’s not your only good option when it comes to search engines. 

Tricks that work on DuckDuckGo but not on google (1)

In days when online privacy is a major concern, here is the upstart search engine ‘DuckDuckGo‘ – a privacy-focussed search engine that offers features which other search engines don’t. Unlike Google, which filters search results based on the sites you have been visiting, DuckDuckGo is a search engine that shows the same results for a search term to all its users. Duck Duck Go also has a policy that users will not be placed into filter bubbles, and the engine automatically diverts users to the encrypted versions of websites to protect them, even when they’re not searching.

 

DuckDuckGo, which has earned a loyal fan following has a few unusual features that even Google doesn’t have. Let’s take a look at them!

1. Search Other Websites from the Address Bar

DDG Bangs

You can search the archives of different websites from the address bar in Chrome, Firefox, and other mainstream browsers. But to do that, you’ll need to set up keyword searches first. With Google, you can use the site: modifier to search for results within a particular site, but then you still have to open the link to see the results. With DuckDuckGo’s awesome ‘!bangs feature’, you can jump right in and search many popular websites.

DDG bangs list

For example, if you want to search for someone’s details on LinkedIn, you don’t need to open the site. Just type “!LinkedIn” followed by the person’s name, and you will see the LinkedIn search results page. You can do this with a large number of websites; Google with !g, Reddit with !r, YouTube with !yt, Gmail with !gmail, just to name a few. You can see the full list by just typing ‘!’ in the DuckDuckGo search bar.

 

2. Check Whether Websites Are Down

down for me

If you can’t open a website, you might want to check if it is not opening anywhere or just on your computer. You can simply ask DuckDuckGo for this and get an instant answer. For example, search DuckDuckGo with the keywords like, “is alltechbuzz down for me

3. Generate passwords

DDG - Generate passwords

With the search engine’s Instant Answers feature, you can even generate strong passwords. If you can’t think of a strong password, just head to DuckDuckGo and search for “Password 10” and you will see a strong 10-character password. If you find those random passwords hard to remember, you can make DuckDuckGo generate XKCD-style passwords. These passwords comprise four common words put together, which are easy to remember and hard to crack, and were first suggested in the popular Web comic XKCD. For these passwords, search “Random passphrase”.

 

That’s not all. DuckDuckGo can even expand shortened URLs and shorten long URLs using ‘expand’ and ‘shorten’ keywords respectively before the URLs.

4. View Color Codes

DDG - View Color Codes

Getting the right color code for a Colour Code is such a hectic task. People working in the Multimedia know this pretty well. DuckDuckGo provides u the complete chart with all the 256 RGB colors with their respective Hex Colour Codes for seamless recognition of hues.

5. Get Cheatsheets for Popular Apps, Services, and Platforms

DDG - Cheatsheets

If you type in the name of a well-known app or even an operating system followed by the word cheatsheet and hit Enter, you’ll get the relevant cheatsheet right there in DuckDuckGo.

The name of the app/platform that you need to use is a bit tricky, though. For example, typing in windows cheatsheet won’t work; you have to be specific. Use windows 8 cheatsheet to get the list of shortcuts for Windows 8. Using this method, you can able to find cheatsheets for Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Evernote, Ubuntu, Facebook and much more. 

 

6. Get HTML Codes As a List

DDG - HTML Codes

Done with helping the Multimedia people and now this is for the Web Designers / Developers out there. These people usually search for the codes on various websites and then copy from them but DuckDuckGo makes your task easy by providing the entire list of HTML Codes for everything including the Decimals & Hex Codes.

7. Generate QR Codes

qr code of alltechbuzz on duckduckgo

QR Codes have become quite popular these days which are being used by the Corporations, Executives as well as Individuals to provide their Contact Information or Product Information, etc. Anyone can create a QR Code for themselves online and can be shared with their friends or anyone. Many sites help you in providing this service but with DuckDuckGo, it is much easier. Before the name of the website or contact, type ‘QR’ and hit Enter. Doesn’t this seem the best way? Yes, of course.

8. Find Alternatives to Apps

DDG - Alternative apps

If you’re looking for a replacement for, say, Facebook, the quickest way to look up alternatives is via a web search or via AlternativeTo, a crowdsourced platform for app recommendations. You can combine the power of both in DuckDuckGo, like so: search for an alternative to Facebook. This gives you a card-like view of Facebook alternatives sourced from AlternativeTo in DuckDuckGo. It also works for Web services, so you can even search for “Alternative to DuckDuckGo” if you like.

This feature doesn’t work with very obscure apps, but it can find most of the well-known ones.

9. Switch Text Case

DDG - switch text case

At times, we come across a situation where we need to convert a part of some Text into Lower Case. DuckDuckGo is enough smart to convert it and what you need to do is just prefix the given sentence with the phrase ‘Lowercase’ and hit Enter and the copy back the given output.

Author: Chaitanya
Source: https://www.alltechbuzz.net/search-tricks-that-work-on-duckduckgo-but-not-on-google

Categorized in Search Engine

When talking about search engines, most people only think of Google. Very few people seem to realize there are other popular search engines out there, even though they usually own a smaller market share. DuckDuckGo recently revealed that they surpassed the milestone of 14 million searches in a single day. As of December 2016, the platform has been gaining a lot of popularity.

THINGS ARE LOOKING GOOD FOR DUCKDUCKGO

Competing with search engine giants such as Google and Bing is not an easy feat for any company. Smaller search engines, such as Wolfram Alpha and DuckDuckGo, have been somewhat struggling to gain market traction. That being said, things have been improving for DuckDuckGo, as December 2016 has been one of their busiest months in history.

Earlier this week, the company revealed how they served over 10 billion searches since launch. Interestingly enough, over 4 billion of those searches occurred in December of 2016. Considering Google and Bing have not had major issues ever since that time, this news has come as quite a surprise. Then again, DuckDuckGo positions itself as the only search engine that does not track its users.

Other good news for DuckDuckGo come in the form of their increased number of daily search queries. About a year ago, the platform served between eight and nine million searches per day. That number surpassed 14 million on January 9th of this year, which is quite a spectacular growth. It appears a lot of internet users want more privacy and transparency when it comes to search results. With all searches being conducted in an anonymous manner, there are no data records about user behavior either.

DuckDuckGo is quite pleased with this development, even though the company is growing a lot faster than even the owners have predicted. With more people actively looking to reduce their digital footprint, it is not unlikely DuckDuckGo will continue to see accelerated growth moving forward. Consumers feel a search engine provider should not retain information regarding their activity, yet that is exactly what Google and Bing are doing.

 

DuckDuckGo has been making headlines for other positive reasons as well. The company recently donated US$225,000 to other companies working on raising the standard of trust online. Government scrutiny, mass surveillance, and data harvesting are all threatening consumer privacy when using the Internet. More and more consumers want to be shielded from unwanted scrutiny, and that situation is also affecting the search engine market right now.

Although there is still a long way to go before companies such as DuckDuckGo can take a real market share away from Google and Bing, things are heading in the right direction. It takes time to gain traction in a market dominated by two players, especially when considering both search engines are operated by two of the largest technology giants in the world. Slowly but surely the public perception of search engines is changing, that much is certain.

Author : JP Buntinx

Source : https://themerkle.com/duckduckgo-sees-significant-growth-as-consumers-look-for-privacy-centric-search-engines/

Categorized in Search Engine

DuckDuckGo revealed it has hit a milestone of 14 million searches in a single day. In addition, the search engine is celebrating a combined total of 10 billion searches performed, with 4 billion searches conducted in December 2016 alone.

For a niche search engine that many people don’t know exists, that’s some notable year-over-year growth. Around this same time last year, DuckDuckGo was serving 8–9 million searches per day on average.

DuckDuckGo is a search engine which has built its reputation on privacy and transparency. All searches are performed anonymously, meaning the company doesn’t track or record data about its users. It’s also one of the most transparent search engines in the sense that it makes its own data publicly available for everyone to see.

According to the company, it is growing faster than ever, which could be credited to the fact that people are actively looking for ways to reduce their digital footprint. DuckDuckGo cites a study from Pew Research which states: “40% think that their search engine provider shouldn’t retain information about their activity.”

 

Staying true to its mission, the company donated $225,000 to nine organizations that are also dedicated to raising the standard of trust online. DuckDuckGo is on the hunt for privacy-focused organizations to donate to this year, so if you have any in mind give them a shout.

Author : Matt Southern

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/duckduckgo-hits-milestone-14-million-searches-single-day/184179/

Categorized in Search Engine

When people think of search engines, the first name that comes to mind is often Google. It’s one of the most enduring brand names, and it has even worked its way into mainstream vernacular, and today many people substitute the phrase “searched online” for “Googled”. According to comScore, Inc., Google and its affiliated websites comprise 67.6% of the search engine market share in the United States, and, according to Netmarketshare 66.44% worldwide.

Though prominent, Google is not the only search engine available. There are innumerable others that provide various interfaces, search algorithms, and other unique features. Many even base their search algorithms around specific philosophies, ones that often attract brand-new audiences.

In descending order, the remaining most popular search engine companies in the United States, by market share after Google, are Microsoft (18.7%), Yahoo (10.0%), Ask Network (2.4%), and AOL (1.3%), according to ComScore report.

Likewise, according to December 2014 data, the remaining most popular search engines worldwide by market share are Baidu (11.15%), Bing (10.29%), Yahoo! (9.31%), and AOL (0.53%).

The exact data is highly variable based on who’s reporting it, and it varies even further on a month-to-month basis. But generally speaking, the ranking order does not vary much.

This list does not necessarily include the 12 most used or well-known search engines after Google; instead, it includes search engines that differ from one another in terms of history, philosophy, content, targeted audiences, and other variables. With that in mind, lets take a look at 12 of the most underrated search engines.

Bing

Based on comScore’s data, the next most powerful player in the search engine industry is Microsoft and its search engine, Bing.

Key differences between the two engines, according to the New York Times, lie in backdrop, search tools, and the amount of information offered on the immediate search page. Bing sports striking, engaging home pages, a display tool when searching for airline flights, aggregate restaurant rating badges, and more. One popular feature is its “linkfromdomain:” search term. This term allows users to see the most frequently used outgoing link from a given site. This can provide easy access to research pages or recommended sites from a trusted source.

Another operator, contains:FILETYPE, allows users to search by file type. Researchers and students with specific softwares may search specifically for PDFs, Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, different photo types, and more universal file types on a whim. This helps to rule out unnecessary documents.

bing filetype operator

Bing’s clean interface particularly excels when searching for videos. The video searches don’t integrate well with text searches on Google. On Bing, the listed videos fit neatly side-by-side in an interface that best accommodates them. This helps to cut down on the amount of time a user would spend scrolling.

Bing hasn’t been shy in comparing itself to Google, either. It has even launched a website titled “Bing It On which directly compares its search results to those of Google.

Yahoo

Another powerful competitor in the search engine market is the long-enduring Yahoo. For many, Yahoo is much more than a search engine; it’s an online Swiss Army knife.

In addition to its search engine, the Yahoo Web portal offers easy access to its news aggregator, games center, retail options, travel guide, horoscope, and other varied features. Yahoo Finance is a popular aggregate for some of the best financial news available, combining information from CNN Money, The Street, and more.

Another extraordinarily well-used feature of Yahoo is Yahoo Answers, which is a forum that allows people to phrase questions in ways the traditional search engines have difficulty handling. Other users can view questions and use their background knowledge and tailor their answers in a personalized manner.

Other popular aspects of Yahoo include easy photo sharing (facilitated by Yahoo’s purchase of Flickr), local news through Yahoo Local, and myriad entertainment options. By having all these convenient features in one place, users rarely have to venture elsewhere if they don’t want to.

Yandex

Founded in Russia in 1997, Yandex has quickly risen to become the country’s premier search engine. Since 2010, it has gone worldwide and become a popular resource for those looking for easy-to-use search pages between different languages. Its translation and cross-lingual search options are featured prominently on its homepage, and it accommodates English, Russian, German, French, and smaller Eastern European languages. This allows bilingual searchers or students working on language projects to more easily find whatever it is they’re looking for.

yandex search engine

Ask

The search engine formerly known as “Ask Jeeves” was easily one of Google’s greatest competitors during the early days of the World Wide Web. Though not the hot commodity it once was, it remains popular for its accommodation of natural, colloquial language. After a user poses a question, it provides possible answers and a large list of other pertinent questions.

Ask’s historic accommodation of vernacular has, in essence, found a spiritual successor through voice commands and searches on mobile devices. Thanks to Apple’s Siri (which relies on Bing) and the Google app, there’s less stigma over voice commands, and they’re becoming more popular. With Siri, users are directly able to bypass using their other apps or search engines by just asking their phone a question.

Though Ask may have popularized the use of dialectal searches, it unfortunately is not as well-integrated with the programs that now champion them.

Dogpile

For those unsure of which search engine to use, many default to Dogpile — the engine that aggregates from pretty much everyone else.

Like Ask, Dogpile is another site with early online history and considerable brand loyalty. Search results (from Google, Yahoo, Yandex, and more) are set upon a focused interface of white and varying shades of blue. Many prefer Dogpile for its chic design, comprehensive answers, and a template that doesn’t prove too distracting or cluttered.

dogpile search engine

Its listed features include: Category Links, Yellow Pages, White Pages, Statistics Bar, Search Finder, Preferences, Spelling Correction, About Results, and Favorite Fetches. A user’s Dogpile experience is easily personalized to a user’s liking.

Yippy

Many Internet users are unfamiliar with the Deep Web. According to CNN, the Deep Web encompasses everything traditional search engines having trouble finding. Pages in the Deep Web may be relatively unconnected to other parts of the Internet or housed on private networks.

yippy search engine

Search engine Yippy (formerly Clusty) searches the Web using other search engines, but it provides results in the form of “clouds” instead of traditional search methods. This makes it more likely to find pages that would be otherwise buried or nearly impossible to find using search engines like Google or Yahoo. Though Yippy doesn’t have the ability to scour the every corner of the Deep Web (no search engine does), it is much more capable and efficient at finding pages for users with more obscure and niche tastes.

Duck Duck Go

With a name based on the popular kids’ game Duck Duck Goose, Duck Duck Go is a website that many find as approachable, user-friendly, and engaging as the game.

Duck Duck Go’s first priority is protecting user privacy. Many adults of all ages find themselves concerned over identity theft and hacking; these issues regularly appear on both local and national news. This search engine doesn’t reach into your history, email, or social media workings to drum up relevant information. Two totally different people can search the same term and get identical results.

 

The search engine also maintains a handy infinite scroll option (no need to click to other pages), reduced advertising spam, and prompts to help clarify a question.

EntireWeb

First launched back in 2000, EntireWeb is a search engine that requires pages to submit their websites to it for free. This results in a much less crowded search space and guarantees those who submit are less likely to be drowned out by other competition. Queries can be submitted for regular Web search, image search, or real-time search.

Blekko

Created just a few years ago in 2010, blekko (with a stylized lowercase “b”) is the search engine clearly inspired by Twitter. While Twitter (and now other social media sites) has “hashtags,” blekko has “slashtags.” When searching something in its database, blekko provides users with a series of related key words with which to narrow their search.

For instance, searching “celebrity news” on blekko turns up the slashtags for Top Results, Gossip, Magazine, and Latest. Blekko’s interface, which combines minimalist squares and a varied color palette, is considered very user-friendly.

blekko search engine results page example

Goodsearch

Recent years have seen an uptick in people’s interest in engaging technology in an ethical manner. As corporations such as Google and Microsoft continue to grow steadily more powerful, people have been better scrutinizing where their money and attention go.

Goodsearch is a search engine for the charitable. Fueled by Yahoo, Goodsearch allows users to pick a cause of their choice; this can be a nonprofit organization or school. Upon selecting their target, Goodsearch will begin donating 50% of its revenue from that user to their cause. To date, Goodsearch has donated well over $11 million to a variety of sources. According to Goodsearch, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) has received more than $50,000, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has received more than $18,000 from the website.

goodsearch search engine donation exa,mple

In recent years, Goodsearch has earned the attention of many celebrities, including Zooey Deschanel, Jessica Biel, and Montel Williams.

GigaBlast

Another search engine boasting enormous social and trust capital is GigaBlast. Founded in 2000, GigaBlast is, according to its LinkedIn page, the “leading clean-energy search engine.” An impressive 90% of its energy usage comes from harnessed wind energy, and the company maintains fewer than 10 employees.

Though it’s physically small, its power is big. GigaBlast indexes well over 10 billion pages of content. As environmental issues become more prominent in public consciousness, people are more likely to turn to sites like GigaBlast.

Baidu

Though a relative unknown in the United States, Chinese search engine Baidu is a juggernaut on the international scene. It’s the top search engine in China (with 62% of search engine market share in 2013), and it is the second most popular search engine in the world.

“China’s Google,” as it is nicknamed, has been steadily growing since its incorporation in 2000, and it has recently begun courting English-speaking developers. Its features include searchable webpages, audio files, and images, a collaborative encyclopedia, and a bustling discussion forum. Thanks to its savvy smartphone integration, it has leapt past its immediate competitor, Qihoo 360, which now has only 21% of the Chinese search engine market share.

baidu-and-google

If Baidu manages to continue its domestic success abroad, it might not be long before it does become a household name in the United States.

In Conclusion

Once-popular search engines like AOL.com and InfoSeek have either died out or are now sock-puppeted by their former competitors. InfoSeek attempted to charge for searches, failed, adjusted by depending on gaudy banner advertisements, became a generic “portal,” and was finally salvaged by Google. As AOL declined after its merger with Time Warner, so did its search engine. Now it is also part of Google.

Search engines in the preceding list still thrive because they capitalize upon some distinct corner of the market. For some, that market involves corporate social responsibility (Goodsearch, GigaBlast), social trends (Blekko), privacy concerns (Duck Duck Go), or utility (Yippy, Dogpile). Giants like Google, Bing, and Yahoo largely dominate the general market, so the others have had to specialize to survive.

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/going-beyond-google-comprehensive-list-search-engines/123880/

Categorized in Search Engine
Page 5 of 6

AOFIRS

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.

Follow Us on Social Media