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You have a lot of options when it comes to watching videos on your devices. Most users seem to use YouTube more or less exclusively for all their family friendly video needs, but sites like Vimeo or Dailymotion are popular as well.

Search on YouTube, with YouTube being a Google property, should be one of the strong features of the video streaming site, but it is not really.

While it works, and even lets you filter by upload date and some additional features, it is nowhere near where it could be. It has no preview feature for instance, and while you can add it using extensions, something like it should be built-in in my opinion.

 

I run all my video searches on Bing Video Search instead, and have two core reasons for that which I would like to explain in detail in the coming paragraphs.

Note: I understand that the comparison between a single-site search engine (YouTube), and a multi-site search engine is not entirely fair. Google's own Video Search seems to focus heavily on YouTube as well however.

Bing Video Search

bing video search

Bing Video Search is a feature of Microsoft's search engine Bing. While I don't use Bing at all for Web searches, as I find the search engine lacking in that regard -- especially for non-English queries -- I find some of Bing's other features quite useful and often superior to Google's offerings.

You can use the following URL as your entry point to run video searches on Bing: https://www.bing.com/videos/

Simply enter the term you are interested in, and wait for Bing to return results to you. Results are listed with thumbnails, the source site they are hosted on, and information on views, play time, uploader, upload date and title.

While most videos may be hosted on YouTube, you may get results from other sites such as Vimeo, Youku, VM, and lots of other video hosting sites as well. This depends largely on your query. This is the first advantage that Bing Video Search offers over YouTube's or Google Video's own search function.

Sites like Vimeo host exclusive content for instance sometimes. A search on YouTube won't find those videos, while a search on Bing will.

The second feature that makes Bing Video Search superior in my opinion is its preview feature. You can hover over any video on Bing Video Search to get a preview of the video. This preview includes sound, and is a great way to quickly determine a video's quality, and whether it matches what you are looking for.

These two features are not the only ones that Bing offers. Here is a short list of other features that you may find interesting:

  • Better filters: You can sort by date, length or resolution, or filter by a specific source.
  • If you turn off SafeSearch, you will get NSFW results.
  • Save videos to your Microsoft Account, and get personalized feeds based on your savings and activity.

Closing Words

Bing Video Search is a handy multi-site search engine for videos that returns both family friendly and NSFW results based on SafeSearch settings. Its preview feature is the feature that I like the most, as it does away with the "opening video > realizing it is not what I was looking for > going back"  workflow on YouTube.

Now You: Which video search engine do you use, and why?

Source: This article was published ghacks.net By Martin Brinkmann

Categorized in Search Engine

Binging for pennies

The uptake for Microsoft's long-suffering search engine, Bing, continues to be so dismal that Redmond has resorted to paying people to use it.

The "loyalty scheme" offers points that can be exchanged for charity donations or music, games, devices and other stuff on the Microsoft Store. Users are awarded three points per search, up to 30 a day at Level 1.

To get an idea of what they're worth, 5,300 gets you a £5 Xbox digital gift card, which equates to 10 per cent off a current-gen game. That's quite a grind – 176 days of furious Binging for pennies. But hit Level 2, by bashing Bing for 500 points per month, and you can reap 150 points a day.

Will this get more people using Bing? Maybe. Will it take Bing to the top? Perhaps not.

Google corners a hefty 77.98 per cent of the global search engine market and doesn't look like it's going anywhere soon. Bing is the second most used at 7.81 per cent, with China's Baidu rounding third at 7.71 percent.

Google once tried a similar experiment called Screenwise. You'd use a browser extension that shared your history and habits – and wind up with about £15 at the end of the year. But it's not like the Chocolate Factory needed the cash... or traffic. ®

Source: This article was published theregister.co.uk By Andrew Silver

Categorized in Search Engine

Bing has introduced a new, commercial-grade site search tool called Bing Custom Search. The announcement and subsequent rollout occurred during Microsoft’s Build conference on Wednesday.

Bing Custom Search allows you to build your own search engine around a specific topic. After selecting a topic, the tool will identify on-topic sites to crawl, apply Bing’s ranking algorithm, and deliver a relevant set of search results.

Alternatively, you can customize the tool to only pull content from select sites. You’ll also have the option to pin results from your favorite sites to the top.

Bing Custom Search can be programmed to pull results from a variety of sites, or one specific site — like your own, for example.

Microsoft is describing it as a tool for creating niche discovery engines for enthusiasts and hobbyists. However, from the sound of it, there’s no reason why it can’t be used to build a search engine to search your site specifically.

Bing says building with Bing Custom Search is easy and straightforward. Results are displayed without ads, and you can set your own parameters for the results that are returned. So if you only want the search engine to return content you wrote within the past year, you can do that.

To get started, go here and sign in with your Microsoft account.

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern

Categorized in Search Engine

Aimed at outdoor enthusiasts, Bing's latest updates will also surface detailed info for local campsites and campgrounds in US national parks.

Bing has rolled out a new search feature aimed at hikers and campers that makes it easier to find trails and camping sites this summer.

According to the announcement, a search for “trails near me” will surface local results for nearby trails that can be filtered by difficulty, length and elevation gain. There is also a “Compare” option so that users can compare specific hikes to determine where they want to go.

 

The latest search update also works with searches to find nearby campsites — surfacing local campgrounds, in addition to camping options at US national parks: “Bing helps you discover camping sites and RV parks in your area, along with all the details of each one, so you can plan your perfect camping getaway.”

Bing’s latest round of search updates for outdoor enthusiasts works on both desktop and mobile. Mobile trail searches include links to live directions for your hike.

Bing noted it now has a flight status search box and parking options for all major US airports for anyone wanting to travel by air to a national park.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Amy Gesenhues

Categorized in Internet Technology

Bing has released an update designed to make it easier to find chat bots for instant messaging platforms.

Searching for a command such as ‘travel bots’ will return a dedicated answer box where you can browse through chat bots for Facebook, Skype, Slack, and Telegram.

Bots can be added to messaging platforms directly from search results by clicking on the “Add bot” button.

Bing is piloting a test program which allows searchers to interact with chat bots on Bing itself. Searching for specific restaurants in the Seattle area can return a dedicated bot which you can chat with for more information about the restaurant.

 

The company says it will be expanding restaurant chat bots to more US metropolitan areas eventually.

Bing is also working on its own “InfoBot”, which taps into information from Wikipedia to answer questions. Multiple domains may be added in the future, such as webmd.com, stackoverflow.com, allrecipes.com and more.

With the Microsoft Bot Framework developers can design their own chat bots for Bing. Bots will have to be reviewed and approved before being made available to searchers.

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal By Matt Southern

Categorized in Search Engine

Many school administrators love Chromebooks, precisely because Google's stripped-down operating system is like a pair of rubber training wheels for children who can't be trusted to drive a full-fledged OS. Microsoft is banking on schools purchasing laptops with Windows 10 S installed, because the company's new operating system severely limits which apps users can install while giving IT administrators fine control over your system.

Unfortunately, Windows 10 S also locks users into Microsoft's ecosystem, forcing you to use Edge as your browser and Bing as your default search engine while preventing you from installing a number of really important apps that don't appear in the Windows Store. If you're an educator, the lack of choice should give you pause and, if you're buying a laptop for yourself or your child, these training wheels are probably a deal breaker.

If you want to use Chrome, Firefox, Opera or pretty much any browser other than Edge, you should not get a laptop with Windows 10 S. In its support FAQ, Microsoft writes that:

"Microsoft Edge is the default web browser on Microsoft 10 S. You are able to download another browser that might be available from the Windows Store, but Microsoft Edge will remain the default if, for example, you open an .htm file. Additionally, the default search provider in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer cannot be changed." (emphasis mine)

I just checked the Windows Store, and I can't find any other major browsers there (or even minor ones). There's an entry for Opera browser, but when you install it, you just get a window with a download button which directs you to opera.com to actually download the app.

Opera App

Perhaps some day, Google and Mozilla will get their browsers into the Windows Store. However, even if that happens, Edge will still be the default browser which opens any time you click a link in an email, a chat app or anywhere else in Windows 10 S. And every time you search by typing a query into Edge's address bar, you'll get results from Bing, with no option to change it to Google.

 

Now, to be fair, many people like using Edge browser, which is fast and has a clean UI. However, if you need any kind of browser extension to make a website work, you probably won't be able to use it on Edge. At present, Edge has only 32 extensions and, unlike Mozilla and Google who let anyone publish an extension, Microsoft hand picks the few developers that can do it.

image_3101161493757768

Some web services just can't work with Edge right now. For example, at work, we use a single sign-on service called Okta, which requires a plugin to work, a plugin which isn't available for Edge. A number of conferencing apps, including Bluejeans and Zoom, require either plug-ins (which Edge doesn't have) or downloadable apps, which aren't in the Windows Store. My mother is a college professor who sometimes grades standardized tests on the weekends, and the online tool she is required to use will only work on Chrome or Firefox.

Microsoft says that Windows 10 S will work with every app in its Windows Store. However, nearly two years after the store launched with Windows 10, a lot of the most important programs aren't available in the store. Here are a few of the many apps which weren't available when I wrote this article:

  • Visual Studio Community / Professional / Enterprise -- Microsoft's own development tool is not in its store so forget about teaching kids to program Windows apps on their Windows 10 S computers.
  • Adobe Photoshop / Adobe Premiere -- You can get the lightweight Adobe Photoshop Express and Photoshop Elements, but forget about the professional versions of Adobe's creative suite.
  • Notepad++ -- My favorite text editor is great for coding and building web pages. You won't find it in the store. There are other text editors in the store, though.
  • Android Studio -- Kids who want to learn how to build apps for Android phones and tablets won't be able to get Google's official development kit.
  • Google Drive -- You can visit Google Drive in your browser in Windows 10 S, but none of the Google client-side apps, including Google Drive, are in the store.
  • Slack / Hipchat -- The two popular group chat apps aren't available in Windows Store.
  • OpenVPN -- There are VPN apps in the Windows Store, but not this popular freeware program.
  • WhatsApp -- Lots of kids chat with this, but they can't on WIndows 10 S.
  • iTunes: Need to interface with your iPhone or download some media from Apple's store? Get a different Windows.

Hopefully, the developers of these apps and others will work with Microsoft to get into the Windows Store. It's almost certain that Microsoft will move its own apps (ex: Visual Studio) into the store at some point too. However, as of this writing, there are so many gaping holes in the store coverage.

For some schools, Windows 10 S's restrictions may initially be a strength rather than a weakness, but if those institutions want to use an education app that's not in the store or a web tool which won't function with Edge, they could have buyer's remorse. Fortunately, Microsoft is going to offer its EDU clients free upgrades to Windows 10 Pro, which I can imagine many of them using.

For individual users who are considering purchasing a Windows 10 S-powered computer like the Surface Laptop, Windows 10 S makes no sense at all. Would you really want to limit what apps and browsers you can use, right out of the box? Isn't the main benefit of Windows over Chrome OS the wide variety of software and services that you can use?

 

If you've been following Microsoft for a few years, you'll remember Windows RT, a failed version of Windows 8, which also only ran special Store apps. RT failed because of its lack of apps and Windows 10 S faces most of the same challenges. There's just one major improvement: any Windows 10 S user can pay $49 to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro, which can run every Windows program in the world and any browser you want. I expect a lot of people to pay that fee.

This article was  published in laptopmag.com by Avram Piltch

Categorized in Others

Facebook is responding to the challenge from Snap in the classic way that tech companies try to face new competitors — by duplicating every core feature that made Snap popular, and then trying to crush it with distribution and marketing.

According to a story published Tuesday in The Information (subscription required), Facebook created a "Teens Team" to figure out how to grab teenagers back from Snapchat, and has been up front about its tactics within the company: The internal mantra among some groups is "don't be too proud to copy."

 

Unfortunately for Facebook, the track record for this strategy is poor.

Flash back to the early 2000s, when Microsoft was the undisputed king of the tech industry, with two unassailable monopolies — operating systems and productivity apps for personal computers.

It faced a lot of competitors, but the one that scared it the most was Google, which was in a completely different business.

Google didn't start by creating alternatives to Windows and Office, although it did so later. Instead, it created a suite of online services — first search, followed by email and maps — that threatened the entire purpose of a personal computer. Why rely on Microsoft software running locally when you could get so much done with web apps?

Microsoft's response? Trying to build the exact same service that made Google famous — a search engine, first known as MSN Search, later rebranded to Bing.

Eleven years later, Bing is a small minority player in search, with less than 10 percent market share on the desktop and less than 1 percent in mobile, according to NetMarketShare. Google dominates with almost 80 percent share on the desktop and well over 90 percent in mobile. "Google" has become a verb. Nobody "Bings" anything.

Bolstered by the massive margins in search advertising, Google has moved farther and farther into Microsoft's core territory, adding a massively successful mobile operating system (Android), web browser (Chrome), online productivity apps (Google for Work) and an increasingly robust cloud computing business. It also surpassed Microsoft in market cap for the first time in 2012 and remains ahead today.

Google faced its own Bing moment in 2011,

 when it faced a challenge from then-upstart Facebook. The social network didn't threaten Google by building a better search engine. It did so by creating an entirely different online service, based around social networking and real identities, that drew people's attention away from search and other Google properties. As people spent more and more time on Facebook, advertisers followed.

Google's response? To launch a competing social network based on real identities called Google+. It was just as successful as Bing — which is to say, not successful at all.

Facebook may still win. After all, Microsoft used this playbook very effectively in the 1990s to eliminate the threat posed by Netscape Navigator — it built a better browser, then shipped it with Windows. It dominated web browsing for almost a decade (until Google came along with Chrome and Apple's iPhone introduced the concept of effective mobile web browsing).

But Microsoft in the 1990s had an effective monopoly on personal computing platforms with Windows. If you wanted to go online, you had to go out of your way not to use Windows. The same is not true for Facebook — there are many ways to communicate and share information in real time with friends, including text messaging platforms like SMS and Apple's iMessage, and competing social networks like Twitter and — yes — Snapchat.

 

Facebook will have to do more to regain teens' attention than simply duplicating every feature that made Snapchat popular.

Source : cnbc.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Bing Ads Editor has been updated with support for Review Extensions. In addition, Bing Ads Editor v11.10 also comes with better keyword import, and an improved ability to create audience associations for Remarketing in Paid Search campaigns.

Categorized in Search Engine

Bing has arguably done something better than releasing its own messaging service. The company has released an extension for a messaging service which millions of people already use.

Bing now has an extension for Apple’s iMessage — and when you think about it, that’s a really smart move.

Instead of trying to force people to break out of their regular habits and use a new messaging service, which Google has been doing for years, Bing is bringing its technology to a messenger people have already grown accustomed to.

 

With the introduction of this extension, Bing’s search engine is now more readily available to iPhone and iPad users. Another reason why this is a smart move is because only one party in the conversation needs to have the extension installed.

That means you can use Bing’s iMessage extension whether or not your contacts are also using it. This is both convenient for users, and good for Bing since it may prompt others to use the extension as well.

With all of that being said, let’s take a look at what it can do.

Bing iMessage Extension Features

Truth be told, Bing’s iMessage extension is fairly limited in what it can do compared to Google Allo. It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles, such as the AI powered Google Assistant, but as a search and sharing tool it gets the job done.

”With the introduction of the Bing iMessage Extension, people can express themselves with GIFs, search and easily share places, movies, and more from the web, without leaving the conversation.”

After tapping on the app extension button and selecting the Bing extension, there’s a swipe-able carousel of categories you can scroll through to find what you need.

Here’s an example Bing provides of how it can be used to share restaurant suggestions to a group of friends:

To start using the extension, simply enable it through iMessage after downloading the Bing app from the App Store.

Source : searchenginejournal.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Skype-powered chatbot is showing up as an assistant to help searchers learn about restaurants in the Seattle area.

Bing has added a chatbot to help users with some of its local search results for restaurants in the Seattle area. After getting a tip from a reader, I was able to reproduce the chatbot option in Bing’s desktop search results, but not in its iOS app nor in the mobile browser search results.

The new feature appears at the bottom of the listing for some individual restaurants in the cities of Redmond (where Microsoft is based) and nearby Bellevue, Washington — both are just outside of Seattle. I’ve seen it on about six to eight different searches for specific restaurants, such as Monsoon in Bellevue. Below the regular business information is an invitation — Questions? Ask Monsoon bot for help — with a “Chat” call-to-action button to the right.

 

Clicking the button pops open a chat window that says it’s powered by Microsoft-owned Skype, and perhaps because I have a Skype account and the software on my desktop computer, the chat window recognizes me by name.

There’s no immediate help or guide telling me what kinds of questions I can ask, so the chat experience is clunky at first. But once you get started, the chatbot offers a number of different questions you can ask, including these:

  • Show me the directions to your place?
  • What parking options you have?
  • What dishes do you recommend?
  • Do you accept Amex?
  • How do I reserve a table?
  • What is your price range?
  • Can I wear formals?
  • Are there any discounts?
  • more…

As I said, the chat was semi-helpful — as is often the case when dealing with chatbots — and you have to learn how to phrase things if you’re not going to use the suggested questions. Here are some screen shots of my conversation with Monsoon bot:


I was able to get this chatbot feature to appear for about six to eight different restaurants in both Redmond and Bellevue, Washington, but it didn’t show up for any of the five to 10 Seattle restaurants I searched for Tuesday night. It also didn’t show up for any hotel searches in any of those same cities.

At this point, we don’t know if this is a limited test or something that’s live for anyone to use. We don’t know if it’s purposely active only for restaurants near Bing’s headquarters. And we don’t know if Bing has plans to use this chatbot feature more widely in the future. We’ve sent questions to Bing to learn more, and we’ll update this article if and when we do.

 

Postscript: A Bing spokesperson declined to answer the questions above about whether this is a test, how widely it’s available, etc. The company did provide this statement: “We’re constantly updating and refining the Bing search experience. We’ll share more information when available.”

Source : searchengineland.com

Categorized in Search Engine
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